“When I went last year, it was very exhilarating to wrestle in front of a big crowd,” said senior heavyweight Ryan Knox, who is making his second consecutive trip to AC.,Joining Knox is fellow senior Derrick Rooney, who wrestles in the 182-pound weight class.,Being that they are close friends as well as two of the higher weight class Rams, Rooney and Knox spent much of their practice time sparring together.,Knox is hoping both he and his teammates can make some noise in this final match not only of the season, but also of their RHS careers.,“It feels so great to call myself a two time state qualifier but it would be even better to bring home some hardware by the end of the trip,” said Knox.

Storley enters Friday’s fight with a 9-0 record, four of those wins coming as a part of Bellator.,Q: You’ve won all four fights you’ve had in Bellator.,I’d say a lot of my success is due to the work ethic that I got while involved in wrestling in high school and college.,Q: How much, if at all, different is it training for a wrestling match than an MMA fight?,Q: What advice would you give to wrestlers who are possibly thinking of a career in MMA?

In sports, extrinsic motivation is when an athlete is motivated by rewards such as money, objects, attention and fame.,In sports, intrinsic motivation is when an athlete is motivated to be the best they can be simply because they want to see what they're truly capable of.,While many athletes' motivation are a mix of extrinsic and intrinsic, and certain extrinsic motivations can increase intrinsic motivation, a significant amount of intrinsic motivation is present in the vast majority of high-achieving athletes.,The Association for Applied Sport Psychology says athletes who are mainly intrinsically motivated generally see less changes in motivation over time, are less distracted, exhibit better focus, and experience less stress when mistakes are made compared to athletes who are mainly extrinsically motivated.,Staying motivated is a constant challenge, but remembering your "why" behind your actions and setting goals (both short- and long-term) will keep you waking up at 5 a.m. for workouts, staying late after practice to run more sprints, or doing more reps than what's required in the weight room and practice.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

Austin Ekeler, an Eaton High School graduate and second-year running back for the Los Angeles Chargers, talked about his career and the team’s preparations for the upcoming National Football League playoffs during an appearance on a national sports radio show on Wednesday.,Ekeler, who graduated from Eaton in 2013 before ending up with the Chargers as an undrafted-free agent in 2017, spoke with Jim Rome on The Jim Rome Show in a 9-minute conversation that touched on the Baltimore Ravens — the Chargers’ opponent in an AFC Wild Card game on Sunday — and Ekeler’s strength that led Los Angeles coach Anthony Lynn to call him pound for pound the strongest guy on the team.,Ekeler told Rome his work in the weight room dates to his days as a student at Eaton.,Ekeler broke nearly every school rushing record at Western, he was an All-American and a finalist his senior year for the Harlon Hill Trophy — the Division II version of the Heisman Trophy.,Rome asked Ekeler about finishing his degree at Western Colorado after his first season with the Chargers.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting��exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.