As the pandemic abruptly turned life upside down around the world, roughly a million public school kids in NYC were thrust into a wildly inconsistent learning environment, with repeated openings and closings of school buildings and systemwide shifts to online learning as COVID-19 rates surge.,While education officials promise to reopen schools this fall for full-time learning again, many New York City parents and students are calling for more than academic recovery, but a reckoning with the disrupted school system’s mental health toll on kids.,A Year Of Anxiety And Turmoil In the short term after Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that public school buildings were closing on March 16th, 2020 and students were shifting to remote learning, some kids said they initially celebrated a break from school.,Disparate Impacts For New York City’s public school system, whose enrollment is 41% Latino, 26% Black, 16% Asian and 15% white, the deadly toll of the pandemic has been acutely felt: “During the first five months of the pandemic, an estimated 4,200 of 4 million children in the state lost a parent or caregiver to coronavirus, a rate of more than one out of every 1,000, according to a report by the United Hospital Fund and Boston Consulting Group released at the end of September,” with more than half of those affected children residents of the Bronx, Brooklyn or Queens, according to Gotham Gazette, which reported the pandemic has disportionately taken parents away from Black and Hispanic families: 1 out of every 600 Black children, and 1 out of every 700 Hispanic children have lost a parent or caregiver, compared to 1 out of 1,400 Asian children and 1 out of 1,500 white children in New York.,The public school student population is also primarily low-income, a point which was hammered home last spring when the city Department of Education had to scramble to outfit hundreds of thousands of families with devices for remote learning.

President Joe Biden has responded by including a provision in the massive pandemic relief bill that would more than double the minimum wage from the current $7.25 to $15 per hour.,The Senate’s parliamentarian may further complicate things with a ruling that the minimum wage measure can’t be included in the pandemic bill.,For now, the measure’s most progressive Senate backers aren’t openly pressuring Biden to step up his campaign for a higher minimum wage.,The Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II, the co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign, said Biden has a “mandate” to ensure the minimum wage increases, noting that minority Americans were “the first to go back to jobs, first to get infected, first to get sick, first to die” during the pandemic.,Biden suggested in the same interview that he’s prepared to engage in a “separate negotiation” on raising the minimum wage, but White House press secretary Jen Psaki offered no further details on the future of the proposal if it is in fact cut from the final coronavirus aid bill.

MARQUETTE — After five deadline extensions that delayed the process by nearly one year, the Marquette City Commission has come to an agreement with Home Renewal Systems Founders Landing LLC to authorize the purchase of Parcel 2A at the Founders Landing site.,The commission voted 4-2 at Monday night’s meeting to approve a local development agreement with HRS, which was the final step in authorizing the purchase of land.,“However, I do think it’s important to point out that in order to get here, we had had to approve five extensions of the purchase agreement deadline totaling over 300 days, and also that there were assurances that were made earlier on in this process — before we were presented with this development agreement — in which it was stated at a city commission meeting that the goal was to make these townhomes ‘attainable for the average household in Marquette.’,“I’m not opposed to any redevelopment of this parcel, I understand the situation with the tiff revenue for this proposed development being part of our revenue stream for the future Lower Harbor piling re-use project, and I commend HRS for the great work that they did on the Grandview Marquette project, but I don’t appreciate that for this particular project, the goalposts have been moved a couple of times and public assurances were made to this commission and to the community that haven’t been kept and haven’t been followed through on.,More information can be found on the project’s website at other business conducted at Monday night’s meeting, the commission received an update from the City of Marquette Board of Review, voted to amend the Land Development Code, extended the Due Diligence Period on a purchase agreement of three parcels at the former Heartwood Forest property, approved a COVID-19 vaccine resolution, updated the City Commission Rules of Procedure to comply with the Open Meetings Act, and voted to add two projects Marquette County’s Hazard Mitigation Plan.

Holmes is believed to be one of the first - if not the first - HBCU graduates to hold the general manager position for any major pro sport.,DETROIT — Brad Holmes, Aggie Alum class of 2002, was named executive vice president and general manager for the Detroit Lions of the National Football League.,In his new role, Holmes will oversee the Lions' football operations and will report directly to principal owner and chairman Sheila Ford Hamp.,Holmes is believed to be one of the first - if not the first - HBCU graduates to hold the general manager position for any major pro sport.,After several months of intensive speech and physical therapy, Holmes fully recovered the ability to speak clearly, and was cleared to play football again in May of 2001.

California urged to move up people who are incarcerated higher on the vaccination order list

5:40 p.m.: Extra vaccine doses not coming to California as promised by Trump administration California’s plan to speed up distribution of the coronavirus vaccine appears to have hit a snag.,If you’re a Kaiser Permanente or Sutter Health patient in Placer County and a senior, here’s who to contact: read more