The county of 10 million people was one of several that moved into the state’s orange tier, which is the second-least restrictive of California’s four-tier system.,The International Olympic Committee and International Paralympic Committee said they fully respect and accept the move

Placer County is one of 13 California counties that have moved Sunday to the red tier of California’s COVID-19 reopening framework, loosening some restrictions.,The counties became eligible to move from the purple tier (“widespread”) to the red tier (“substantial” spread) after the state hit its goal Friday of delivering 2 million COVID-19 doses to communities hit hardest by the pandemic, triggering new thresholds.,Butte County has qualified to move from the most stringent purple tier to the less-restrictive red tier of the state’s COVID-19 reopening plan.,For a county to move down to the red tier, there should be a case rate of 4-7 per 100,000 residents with a 5-8% test positivity rate. read more

Here’s a look at the legal road ahead for Trump —-

Atlanta prosecutors opened a criminal investigation into whether Trump attempted to overturn his election loss in Georgia, including a Jan. 2 phone call in which he urged the state’s Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger to “find” enough votes to reverse Biden’s narrow victory.,Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr., a Democrat, is in the midst of an 18-month criminal investigation focusing in part on hush-money payments paid to women on Trump’s behalf, and whether Trump or his businesses manipulated the value of assets — inflating them in some cases and minimizing them in others — to gain favorable loan terms and tax benefits.,Last month, Vance’s office sent subpoenas to local governments in the New York City suburbs seeking information about a sprawling Westchester estate Trump owns there, and 158 acres of land he donated to conservation land trust in 2016 to qualify for an income tax deduction.,New York Attorney General Letitia James’ civil investigation focuses on some of the same issues as Vance’s criminal probe, including possible property value manipulation and tax write-offs Trump’s company, the Trump Organization, claimed on millions of dollars in consulting fees it paid, including money that went to Trump’s daughter Ivanka.,Lawyers for Summer Zervos, a restaurateur who worked with Trump as a contestant on “The Apprentice,” asked New York’s high court last week to dismiss as moot Trump’s appeal that argued a sitting president can’t be sued in a state court. read more

(U.S. District Court, FBI arrest affidavit)

A man identified as Christian Secor is seen in the U.S. Capitol during the protest and unrest on Jan. 6.,(U.S. District Court, FBI arrest affidavit) read more

The last time San Diego elected a moderate Republican mayor with strong potential for appealing to voters statewide, it was Pete Wilson, a onetime state assemblyman who later won election to the U.S. Senate and two terms as governor.,Now, while Californians think about possibly recalling Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom, there’s San Diego’s recently termed-out ex-Mayor Kevin Faulconer, who figures to be on both the recall’s list of possible replacement governors and the state’s June 2022 primary ballot.,With Faulconer as mayor, San Diego was the largest American city with a Republican governor.,Faulconer has sometimes sought to downplay his Republican identity in this state where the GOP label has lately meant certain defeat for anyone seeking statewide office other than the movie muscleman Schwarzenegger.,Faulconer said San Diego cut homelessness after a hepatitis outbreak by sending nurses and paramedics to “every riverbed, canyon and street corner, vaccinated more than 100,000 persons, sanitized streets and built four bridge shelters.”

President Joe Biden has responded by including a provision in the massive pandemic relief bill that would more than double the minimum wage from the current $7.25 to $15 per hour.,The Senate’s parliamentarian may further complicate things with a ruling that the minimum wage measure can’t be included in the pandemic bill.,For now, the measure’s most progressive Senate backers aren’t openly pressuring Biden to step up his campaign for a higher minimum wage.,The Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II, the co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign, said Biden has a “mandate” to ensure the minimum wage increases, noting that minority Americans were “the first to go back to jobs, first to get infected, first to get sick, first to die” during the pandemic.,Biden suggested in the same interview that he’s prepared to engage in a “separate negotiation” on raising the minimum wage, but White House press secretary Jen Psaki offered no further details on the future of the proposal if it is in fact cut from the final coronavirus aid bill.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on former President Donald Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial (all times local):

11:00 p.m. read more

So, let me hang a pistol on the wall: government filings show the union representing Orange County’s sheriff’s deputies has piled up nearly a million dollars in order to keep former state Sen. John Moorlach from winning what should be a guaranteed victory in the March 9 election for a seat on the county’s Board of Supervisors.,Chastened for a time, the county’s elected officials temporarily heeded Moorlach’s warning to resist the perpetual demands of government union leaders for more — higher salaries, earlier retirements, richer retiree health plans.,Moorlach was still the county’s treasurer when, in 1999, public officials all over California, like sober alcoholics who can no longer remember their last bender, began acceding to the nonstop union demands for higher public employee pay and benefits.,•••

This pandemic, this frenzy among public officials eager to raise public pay in exchange for campaign support from government union leaders, came even to Orange County.,You can just imagine John Moorlach confronting this Bourbon Street parade, this madness of doubloon-tossing, bare-chested public officials and their union allies just seven years after the words “Orange County” and “bankrupt” were in headlines all over the planet. read more

WASHINGTON — Donald Trump’s first impeachment trial centered on a phone call Americans never heard with the leader of a country very far away.,Trump’s second impeachment trial was a steroidal sequel centered on the rage, violence and anguish of one day in Washington.,In a broadside against Trump every bit as brutal as that leveled by Democrats, Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell declared the ex-president “practically and morally responsible for provoking the events of the day” with his “unconscionable behavior” and “disgraceful dereliction of duty.”,This was an impeachment driven by what people saw happen and by Trump’s voluminous public rhetoric, heard that day, for weeks before, and after — until Twitter exiled him and he let his lawyers and supporters do the talking while the trial played out.,The peril to Trump’s vice president, Mike Pence, who was presiding in the Senate during the day’s election certification, also came into sharper relief.

By The Associated Press

MINNEAPOLIS — Minnesota health officials urged this week that people wear masks — and wear them properly — as the state reported an additional 964 new infections on Saturday.,Louisiana has registered 9,276 confirmed coronavirus deaths, 16th highest in the U.S. read more

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A Republican lawmaker has proposed a measure that would ban the changing of any Indiana city names in the wake of Native American protests that forced the renaming of professional sports teams.,The bill being considered by a state Senate committee would prohibit the four cities named in the state Constitution — Indianapolis, Clarksville, Vincennes and Evansville — and some 140 cities referenced in state laws from name changes, The (Northwest Indiana) Times reported.,Sandlin, at first, said during a Senate committee hearing Thursday that the bill was necessary because allowing the renaming of cities would require too much work to update the Indiana code or amend the state Constitution.,A Republican senator from far southwestern Indiana said he believed a city name-change ban might be warranted.,The committee chairman, Republican Sen. Jim Buck of Kokomo, said he allowed a hearing on the bill because he was concerned about wasting tourism promotion money if cities could change their names for any reason.