President Joe Biden has responded by including a provision in the massive pandemic relief bill that would more than double the minimum wage from the current $7.25 to $15 per hour.,The Senate’s parliamentarian may further complicate things with a ruling that the minimum wage measure can’t be included in the pandemic bill.,For now, the measure’s most progressive Senate backers aren’t openly pressuring Biden to step up his campaign for a higher minimum wage.,The Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II, the co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign, said Biden has a “mandate” to ensure the minimum wage increases, noting that minority Americans were “the first to go back to jobs, first to get infected, first to get sick, first to die” during the pandemic.,Biden suggested in the same interview that he’s prepared to engage in a “separate negotiation” on raising the minimum wage, but White House press secretary Jen Psaki offered no further details on the future of the proposal if it is in fact cut from the final coronavirus aid bill.

The pandemic exacerbated the decline of print advertising, an ongoing trend for our newsroom and the industry, but people kept coming to our news because it helped them, brought some joy or added necessary information to an important conversation.,But faced with another mostly virtual semester and a struggling local economy, we had to make a difficult choice as we prepared for the spring:

The Daily Tar Heel is moving to weekly print production.,But the majority of the UNC community won’t be walking through campus this semester, so by shifting our focus away from print, we can concentrate more resources to make our digital news even more relevant and helpful.,As we prepare for the spring semester, know The Daily Tar Heel is strong and ready to be here for you when news happens.,As always: print news, raise read more

Drug use among students decline Attorney General Bill Lockyer on Monday released the findings of a survey that shows overall drug use by California students has declined for the first time in a decade.,However, the preliminary findings of the Biennial California Student Survey also showed the level of excessive alcohol and drug use by heavy users remained unchanged, and the use of heroin by 11th graders has increased, according to a spokesman.,Marijuana use among freshmen and junior high school students has decreased substantially overall, a trend that peaked in 1995 and leveled out in 1997, Barankin said.,Barankin said the largest declines were found in alcohol use, but noted that although student alcohol consumption has fallen for the first time in 15 years, it still remains high.,High school juniors reporting heroin use in the last six months increased from 1.7 percent in 1997-98 to 5.2 percent this year, and remained rare among other grades.