As the pandemic abruptly turned life upside down around the world, roughly a million public school kids in NYC were thrust into a wildly inconsistent learning environment, with repeated openings and closings of school buildings and systemwide shifts to online learning as COVID-19 rates surge.,While education officials promise to reopen schools this fall for full-time learning again, many New York City parents and students are calling for more than academic recovery, but a reckoning with the disrupted school system’s mental health toll on kids.,A Year Of Anxiety And Turmoil In the short term after Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that public school buildings were closing on March 16th, 2020 and students were shifting to remote learning, some kids said they initially celebrated a break from school.,Disparate Impacts For New York City’s public school system, whose enrollment is 41% Latino, 26% Black, 16% Asian and 15% white, the deadly toll of the pandemic has been acutely felt: “During the first five months of the pandemic, an estimated 4,200 of 4 million children in the state lost a parent or caregiver to coronavirus, a rate of more than one out of every 1,000, according to a report by the United Hospital Fund and Boston Consulting Group released at the end of September,” with more than half of those affected children residents of the Bronx, Brooklyn or Queens, according to Gotham Gazette, which reported the pandemic has disportionately taken parents away from Black and Hispanic families: 1 out of every 600 Black children, and 1 out of every 700 Hispanic children have lost a parent or caregiver, compared to 1 out of 1,400 Asian children and 1 out of 1,500 white children in New York.,The public school student population is also primarily low-income, a point which was hammered home last spring when the city Department of Education had to scramble to outfit hundreds of thousands of families with devices for remote learning.

Arts Candidates

Nicole de Grano, a third-year political science and women's and gender studies student— running for Students' Council and GFC.,Charles Blondin: I am running for Students' Council because I want to provide a strong and passionate voice for students who may feel that they have no say in their university governance and advocate for better financial support for all university students, as well as seek additional external sources of funding for the Students' Union.,Furthermore, I feel that my previous experience as an open studies councillor and on the Students' Union Council Administration Committee member, along with leadership skills I had developed while serving at Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC), has prepared me for a leadership role within council.,I’ve already done some work in my time in this role, but I believe my work is far from over read more

— High school students in Broward County have a new resource to build the skills to succeed in college and beyond, thanks to a partnership announced today between Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) and the National Educational Equity Lab (Ed Equity Lab), a nonprofit that works to bridge the gap between high school and college for students from low-income backgrounds.,The ambitious initiative, which has reached over 3,000 high school students in 34 cities over the past 18 months, will provide more than 200 students at Title I high schools across BCPS with free access to Yale University’s most popular course, “Psychology and the Good Life,” taught by pioneering cognitive psychologist Dr. Laurie Santos.,In addition to its launch in Broward County, the Ed Equity Lab will deliver and support Yale’s course to students in more than 40 Title I high schools across the country, including in Los Angeles, New York, Baton Rouge, Orlando, Meriden, Connecticut, and Gallup, New Mexico.,In addition to Yale and UConn, other top colleges and universities working with the Ed Equity Lab to provide college credit-bearing courses to talented historically underserved high school students include: Howard University, Cornell University, Arizona State University and Harvard University for the inaugural pilot.,“Our work with universities and districts around the country shows that especially for students in underserved schools, access to actual college courses with real college professors can have a transformative impact,” said Alexandra Slack, Chief of Staff at the National Education Equity Lab.

— High school students in Broward County have a new resource to build the skills to succeed in college and beyond, thanks to a partnership announced today between Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) and the National Educational Equity Lab (Ed Equity Lab), a nonprofit that works to bridge the gap between high school and college for students from low-income backgrounds.,The ambitious initiative, which has reached over 3,000 high school students in 34 cities over the past 18 months, will provide more than 200 students at Title I high schools across BCPS with free access to Yale University’s most popular course, “Psychology and the Good Life,” taught by pioneering cognitive psychologist Dr. Laurie Santos.,In addition to its launch in Broward County, the Ed Equity Lab will deliver and support Yale’s course to students in more than 40 Title I high schools across the country, including in Los Angeles, New York, Baton Rouge, Orlando, Meriden, Connecticut, and Gallup, New Mexico.,In addition to Yale and UConn, other top colleges and universities working with the Ed Equity Lab to provide college credit-bearing courses to talented historically underserved high school students include: Howard University, Cornell University, Arizona State University and Harvard University for the inaugural pilot.,“Our work with universities and districts around the country shows that especially for students in underserved schools, access to actual college courses with real college professors can have a transformative impact,” said Alexandra Slack, Chief of Staff at the National Education Equity Lab.

Drug use among students decline Attorney General Bill Lockyer on Monday released the findings of a survey that shows overall drug use by California students has declined for the first time in a decade.,However, the preliminary findings of the Biennial California Student Survey also showed the level of excessive alcohol and drug use by heavy users remained unchanged, and the use of heroin by 11th graders has increased, according to a spokesman.,Marijuana use among freshmen and junior high school students has decreased substantially overall, a trend that peaked in 1995 and leveled out in 1997, Barankin said.,Barankin said the largest declines were found in alcohol use, but noted that although student alcohol consumption has fallen for the first time in 15 years, it still remains high.,High school juniors reporting heroin use in the last six months increased from 1.7 percent in 1997-98 to 5.2 percent this year, and remained rare among other grades.

Performance classes like band, choir and drama face unique challenges and harsher restrictions than others given the difficulties of singing and playing instruments with a mask, as well as the aerosols created by both activities.,After trying and failing to figure out a way to put on a performance via Zoom, the students now attend drama classes and clubs without the end goal of a show in mind.,In “hybrid” drama school, Kellogg has consistently had only one to three students attending class in person.,On Kellogg’s Zoom screen, LaCroix was one of four students in 7:30 a.m. “Advanced Drama” class.,Rodriguez said that the rising cases and the limits on music classes have caused more and more students to go online, or to quit marching band altogether.