By Jef Feeley | Bloomberg

Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. and Sanofi were ordered to pay the state of Hawaii more than $834 million for illegally marketing their blockbuster blood-thinning drug Plavix in a manner that put some users’ lives at risk.,The companies produce the medicine as part of a joint venture.The $834 million was awarded as a civil penalty for Bristol-Myers Squibb and Sanofi’s violation of Hawaii’s consumer-protection laws through their improper Plavix marketing campaigns.,In a 43-page ruling, Ochiai said Bristol-Myers’ and Sanofi’s deceptive marketing practices “knowingly placed Plavix patients at grave risk of serious injury or death in order to substantially increase their profits.”,During a four-week online trial last year, Hawaii’s lawyers argued that for poor drug metabolizers, Plavix may not have lowered the risk of a recurrent heart attack or stroke, as touted by Bristol-Myers and Sanofi.,He noted the violations of Hawaii’s laws barring unfair or deceptive trade practices didn’t end until March 2010, when the companies added information about some users having problems metabolizing the drug to Plavix’s safety label. read more

Some 533,000 doses of Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines, which both require a second dose a few weeks after the first, had been administered in Orange County by Sunday, Feb. 14, according to the state Department of Public Health.,At least 306,000 people who live or work in Orange County had received at least one dose by Monday, Feb. 8, according to the OC Health Care Agency’s latest available data.,A month ago, eligibility in the county was expanded from frontline health care workers and those in long-term care facilities to seniors 65 and older as well.,With vaccination super sites in Anaheim and Aliso Viejo and roaming pop-up mobile clinics, the county Health Care Agency has borne the brunt of bristling demand for COVID-19 immunization as traditional health care providers rev up their own drives.,On Friday, state health officials announced that starting March 15, vaccine administrators could start inoculating people ages 16 to 64 with medical conditions that put them at increased risk of having a deadly case of COVID-19.

The National Risk Index, put together by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), is based on calculations by 80 experts over six years and reveals the risks for each county in the United States for 18 natural hazards including earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, volcanoes, tsunamis and even winter weather.,The 18 natural hazards included in the index are avalanches, coastal flooding, cold wave (a cooling of air), drought, earthquake, hail, heat wave, hurricane, ice storm, landslide, lightning, river flooding, strong wind, tornado, tsunami, volcanic activity, wildfire and winter weather.,While the risk of hurricanes is not applicable in Los Angeles County, several other hazards are very high, including wildfires, earthquakes and river flooding.,Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; Score: 57.72 Most at risk for heat waves, ice storms, lightning, river flooding, strong winds, tornadoes and winter weather.,The county is at very high risk of heat waves, ice storms, strong winds, tornadoes and winter weather.

To stay motivated to work out, you should set achievable, time-based goals that you can measure, like 'exercise for 20 minutes five days a week.',Examples of SMART goals include:  Run my first 5k in the next three months Exercise for 20 minutes every day  Be able to do 20 push-ups by the end of next month

Setting smaller "process" goals, which you can achieve along the way to a larger goal, can also keep you motivated, says Jen Kates, a certified personal trainer, and health coach, and founder of Shift Human Performance.,A 2009 study looked at adults' intrinsic goals for exercise, such as improving health and advancing exercise skills, and extrinsic goals, such as enhancing their image.,For example, if you can only find time for 15 minutes of exercise a day, that's okay.,Insider's takeaway  To stay motivated to work out, try setting SMART goals, switching workouts, or finding a workout buddy or group. read more

California is immediately allowing residents 65 and older to get scarce coronavirus vaccines, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Wednesday.,“With our hospitals crowded and ICUs full, we need to focus on vaccinating Californians who are at highest risk of becoming hospitalized to alleviate stress on our health care facilities,” said Dr. Tomás Aragón, director of the California Department of Public Health and the state's Public Health Officer.,But it comes after members of a state advisory panel on Tuesday worried that adding seniors will inevitably delay vaccines for others.,Adding the aging “does not mean we’re abandoning our commitment” to those already in line for vaccines, the panel’s co-chairwoman, California Surgeon General Dr. Nadine Burke Harris said later.,Newsom also announced a new system to let people know if they are eligible to receive a vaccine, to start next week.