Boyle bases his argument on circumstantial evidence: the presence of a Biosafety Level 4 lab in Wuhan, the fact that other viruses have escaped from other labs in the past, and his belief that governments around the world are engaged in a secret arms race over biological weapons.,A World Heath Organization team concluded it was extremely unlikely the virus escaped from the Wuhan lab, and other experts have said the virus shows no signs of genetic IT IS: A website that was an early promoter of the theory that the coronavirus was engineered.,The coronavirus most likely first appeared in humans after jumping from an animal, a World Health Organization panel announced this month, saying an alternate theory that the virus leaked from a Chinese lab was unlikely.,COVID CLAIM: While the center has published several articles about the virus, one suggesting it originated in the U.S. caught the attention of top Chinese officials.,The story by Larry Romanoff, a regular author at the center, cites several debunked theories, including one that members of the U.S. military brought the virus to China during the Military World Games in fall 2019.

Without access to the activities and people we've traditionally sought inspiration from - whether colleagues or concerts, travel or theatre, dance or Degas - our creative wells are drying up, which has enormous consequences in the workplace.,While waiting for my coffee I'd overhear the barista gush about a new podcast, I'd pass fresh graffiti en route to the office, then I'd run into a colleague and we'd talk shop before parting ways at the boardroom.,One in four remote managers surveyed said that their teams' creativity has suffered since working from home.,The good news: Intrinsic motivators like interest, enjoyment, and a good challenge are a treasure-trove for creativity.,Encourage your colleagues to escape their home offices whether it's for a workout, a 20-minute meditation session, or even just a walk around the block.

So, let me hang a pistol on the wall: government filings show the union representing Orange County’s sheriff’s deputies has piled up nearly a million dollars in order to keep former state Sen. John Moorlach from winning what should be a guaranteed victory in the March 9 election for a seat on the county’s Board of Supervisors.,Chastened for a time, the county’s elected officials temporarily heeded Moorlach’s warning to resist the perpetual demands of government union leaders for more — higher salaries, earlier retirements, richer retiree health plans.,Moorlach was still the county’s treasurer when, in 1999, public officials all over California, like sober alcoholics who can no longer remember their last bender, began acceding to the nonstop union demands for higher public employee pay and benefits.,•••

This pandemic, this frenzy among public officials eager to raise public pay in exchange for campaign support from government union leaders, came even to Orange County.,You can just imagine John Moorlach confronting this Bourbon Street parade, this madness of doubloon-tossing, bare-chested public officials and their union allies just seven years after the words “Orange County” and “bankrupt” were in headlines all over the planet. read more

The pandemic exacerbated the decline of print advertising, an ongoing trend for our newsroom and the industry, but people kept coming to our news because it helped them, brought some joy or added necessary information to an important conversation.,But faced with another mostly virtual semester and a struggling local economy, we had to make a difficult choice as we prepared for the spring:

The Daily Tar Heel is moving to weekly print production.,But the majority of the UNC community won’t be walking through campus this semester, so by shifting our focus away from print, we can concentrate more resources to make our digital news even more relevant and helpful.,As we prepare for the spring semester, know The Daily Tar Heel is strong and ready to be here for you when news happens.,As always: print news, raise read more

And so therefore, how do we approach that in a way that isn't a one, two, three formula, but a series of small experiments, little things that we try to make sense of our particular team and our particular context?,01:36 Shane Hastie: You say teams as complex environments, this is the Engineering Culture podcast, surely, we can treat people like we treat process and engineering and stuff, or maybe not.,04:12 Doug Maarschalk: Autonomy is really around choice, and people having the feeling, the need, it's this feeling that the things that I'm doing are of my own volition, I'm deciding to do these things.,So this one particular team might not have a great sense of purpose, and that's showing up as a bunch of people doing things differently, and they aren't on the same trajectory.,07:27 Doug Maarschalk: Another interesting thing around that, that I've learned is autonomy is the sense of having choice.

And so therefore, how do we approach that in a way that isn't a one, two, three formula, but a series of small experiments, little things that we try to make sense of our particular team and our particular context?,01:36 Shane Hastie: You say teams as complex environments, this is the Engineering Culture podcast, surely, we can treat people like we treat process and engineering and stuff, or maybe not.,04:12 Doug Maarschalk: Autonomy is really around choice, and people having the feeling, the need, it's this feeling that the things that I'm doing are of my own volition, I'm deciding to do these things.,So this one particular team might not have a great sense of purpose, and that's showing up as a bunch of people doing things differently, and they aren't on the same trajectory.,07:27 Doug Maarschalk: Another interesting thing around that, that I've learned is autonomy is the sense of having choice.

Before the Rockets agreed to send James Harden to the Nets as part of a blockbuster four-team deal, the 76ers were long considered the favorites to acquire the former MVP because they had a piece no other team could offer: Ben Simmons.,Houston had reportedly been seeking a young franchise cornerstone as part of any Harden package, and Simmons fit that description better than any other player that was realistically available.,The Rockets reportedly wanted Simmons, picks and other players in a potential deal with the Sixers — Tyrese Maxey and Matisse Thybulle were part of discussions — and even for a superstar like Harden, that’s a high asking price.,He was told Irving could hypothetically be part of a transaction that allows the Nets to obtain multiple first-round picks, or he could only be attached in a trade as filler.,Now Brooklyn will move forward with a “Big Three” of Harden, Irving and Kevin Durant, while Philadelphia will focus on building around Simmons and Embiid.

Gov. Reynolds Delivers 2021 Condition of the State

Rozenboom Opens Senate Session With Prayer read more