While the commute is a great time to improve your productivity, effectiveness or outlook on working life, you should also take time to treat yourself.,If you’re a regular reader of Hack Your Commute, you’ll know that most of our hacks involve enhancing your productivity, effectiveness or outlook on working life.,So if you’re regularly spending time during your commute on enriching and productive pursuits, it may help your chances of sticking to them if you allow yourself to do something you like once you’ve reached certain targets.,Research published earlier this year by Kaitlin Woolley and Ayelet Fishbach of Cornell University found that offering an immediate reward for a task created greater engagement and intrinsic motivation to complete it, compared with a delayed reward or none at all, because it created a “perceptual fusion” between the two.,Alternatively, if you have a 40-minute commute, you could spend the first 30 on your chosen task and the last 10 on something fun.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting��exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

In "Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us," Daniel Pink explained motivation's different forms: extrinsic and intrinsic.,Imagine you have three business priorities this year: expanding your team, developing a social-media marketing strategy and overhauling an important product feature.,Tasks are best offloaded to someone else when you can redirect that time, focus or energy to high-level activities only you can carry out.,“Once I remembered that my motivation is rooted in genuine curiosity and my tasks are in complete alignment with who I am and want to be,” Piver wrote, “my office suddenly seemed like a playground rather than a labor camp.”,Focus on what matters, create systems to support your mission, and motivation soon will fall into step alongside you.

Phil Letendre, owner of Gettysburg Performance Gym, said the majority of New Year’s resolutions aren’t met because people become discouraged when they set the bar too high and can’t meet their expectations.,For people who want to trade fat for muscle in 2019, Letendre recommends a fitness regime with SMART goals: specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and time bound.,Up the road at the YWCA Gettysburg and Adams County, Kevin Ecker, assistant director of sports and fitness, said he’s used to seeing a wave of new people at 909 Fairfield Road every January.,While someone’s initial goal may be to lose weight, Ecker’s hope is people will want to continue exercise after meeting that goal.,Going to the gym with a friend or signing up for a membership are two ways to force yourself to be dedicated, according to Ecker, who wants newcomers to know most people at the gym are friendly and staff are always willing to help.

The request starts with a simple: “I am looking for a Leadership Training of my Employees” and it stops there.,Two things: We never ask the training provider (and unfortunately they never offer either) to have a meeting with us and together define the content the exact curriculum that will be used to train our employees.,Professional trainers tend to teach the same courses repeatedly instead of hopscotching into topics or technologies they don’t really know, so they can get your money.,Golden Tip: Never hire a trainer who is not passionate about that subject you are seeking training for!,In Conclusion Please take an active role in defining the right training for your organization and feel welcome to challenge both the training provider as an institution but also the course trainer too.

Why team resilience is the new employee engagement.,The general idea behind an employee engagement strategy is that when employees feel good, it will result in higher profits through increased productivity, and save money in the form of reduced healthcare costs and sick days and less employee turnover.,When you apply this concept to the workplace, a team that demonstrates resilience will produce better results over an extended period than a group that is not resilient because they are invested in the mission of the organization, able to adapt in the face of a challenge and support each other to achieve their mutual success.,If your organization is like most, the results of your annual employee engagement survey lead to the nebulous question of "what do we need to do to improve" that does not have a clear-cut answer.,At the end of the day, there is nothing fundamentally wrong with an employee engagement strategy, or with all the fancy software that exists to support the idea through perks and recognition.