— High school students in Broward County have a new resource to build the skills to succeed in college and beyond, thanks to a partnership announced today between Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) and the National Educational Equity Lab (Ed Equity Lab), a nonprofit that works to bridge the gap between high school and college for students from low-income backgrounds.,The ambitious initiative, which has reached over 3,000 high school students in 34 cities over the past 18 months, will provide more than 200 students at Title I high schools across BCPS with free access to Yale University’s most popular course, “Psychology and the Good Life,” taught by pioneering cognitive psychologist Dr. Laurie Santos.,In addition to its launch in Broward County, the Ed Equity Lab will deliver and support Yale’s course to students in more than 40 Title I high schools across the country, including in Los Angeles, New York, Baton Rouge, Orlando, Meriden, Connecticut, and Gallup, New Mexico.,In addition to Yale and UConn, other top colleges and universities working with the Ed Equity Lab to provide college credit-bearing courses to talented historically underserved high school students include: Howard University, Cornell University, Arizona State University and Harvard University for the inaugural pilot.,“Our work with universities and districts around the country shows that especially for students in underserved schools, access to actual college courses with real college professors can have a transformative impact,” said Alexandra Slack, Chief of Staff at the National Education Equity Lab.

Mural artists Brian Peterson, left, and Damin Lujan of Santa Ana created a 35-by-40-foot mural depicting Kobe Bryant of the Los Angeles Lakers and Mookie Betts of the Los Angeles Dodgers on a building overlooking the parking lot of Philippe the Original sandwich shop in Los Angeles.,(Photo courtesy of Brian Peterson and Damin Lujan)

David Ahn stands beneath the mural of Kobe Bryant and Mookie Betts he commissioned to be painted on the side of his building at 686 N. Spring St. in Los Angeles, CA.,(Photo by Andy Holzman) read more

— High school students in Broward County have a new resource to build the skills to succeed in college and beyond, thanks to a partnership announced today between Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) and the National Educational Equity Lab (Ed Equity Lab), a nonprofit that works to bridge the gap between high school and college for students from low-income backgrounds.,The ambitious initiative, which has reached over 3,000 high school students in 34 cities over the past 18 months, will provide more than 200 students at Title I high schools across BCPS with free access to Yale University’s most popular course, “Psychology and the Good Life,” taught by pioneering cognitive psychologist Dr. Laurie Santos.,In addition to its launch in Broward County, the Ed Equity Lab will deliver and support Yale’s course to students in more than 40 Title I high schools across the country, including in Los Angeles, New York, Baton Rouge, Orlando, Meriden, Connecticut, and Gallup, New Mexico.,In addition to Yale and UConn, other top colleges and universities working with the Ed Equity Lab to provide college credit-bearing courses to talented historically underserved high school students include: Howard University, Cornell University, Arizona State University and Harvard University for the inaugural pilot.,“Our work with universities and districts around the country shows that especially for students in underserved schools, access to actual college courses with real college professors can have a transformative impact,” said Alexandra Slack, Chief of Staff at the National Education Equity Lab.

Sketch of 8-plex part of Irvine Community Land Trusts Sage Park, a 68-home “affordable” development in Irvine’s Portola Springs neighborhood.,(Courtesy: ICLT)

Sketch of 6-plex part of Irvine Community Land Trusts Sage Park, a 68-home “affordable” development in Irvine’s Portola Springs neighborhood.,(Courtesy: ICLT) read more

BRANDON, Fla. — Former NFL wide receiver Vincent Jackson was found dead Monday at a Florida hotel room, days after authorities spoke with him as part of a welfare check, according to the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office.,“My heart aches for the many loved ones Vincent Jackson leaves behind, from his wife and children to the Buccaneers nation that adored him,” Chronister said in a statement posted on social media.,“Mr. Jackson was a devoted man who put his family and community above everything else,” the sheriff said, noting that Jackson, a South Tampa resident, was made an honorary deputy.,Mourning his death, Jackson’s former teams highlighted his dedication to community service.,“During his five seasons with our franchise, Vincent was a consummate professional, who took a great deal of pride in his performance on and off the football field,” Buccaneers owner and co-chairman Bryan Glazer said in a statement, noting Jackson’s work in the community.

5:16 p.m.: In diverse Stockton, people of color still underrepresented in vaccination People of color in California are still underrepresented among COVID vaccine recipients, even in Stockton, which U.S. News and World Report ranked last year as the most racially diverse city in the country.,According to the Associated Press, as more people are vaccinated and the daily number of COVID-19 cases and deaths drop, public health officials are starting to relax on containment strategies.,While stressing that people should avoid close contact — including sex — with anyone outside their household, the city’s public health department told the San Francisco Chronicle it was updating guidance it first issued last year “to reflect the latest science on COVID-19.”,12:09 p.m.: Some fitness trainers got vaccine as 'health care workers'

Some fitness trainers in California were able to get vaccinated against COVID-19 after state health officials created a loophole that helped them qualify as health care workers.,KGO-TV reports that in January, the California Department of Public Health released updated guidelines on vaccination allocation that classified outdoor recreation as health care, the first tier eligible to get the vaccine along with people over 75. read more

From entry level programs of one day per week through to frequent presence of our national team athletes, SSCV aspires to support developing the initial discovery period of involvement through when true ignition of intrinsic motivation leads to the deep commitment to a sport with our ultimate goal of these athletes becoming the best they can be.,The growth of athlete membership at SSCV is only possible through the strength of our exceptional partners: Vail Resorts, Vail Ski and Snowboard Academy, Vail Mountain School, Red Sandstone Elementary School, The Steadman Clinic, Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail Valley Foundation and Alpine Bank — among the most notable.,Our membership growth is directly associated with our school partnerships which have transformed a trend of when Vail Valley athletes reaching an elite level would look at eastern ski academies to allow for pursuing their athletics in parallel with receiving the necessary academic flexibility and support.,We have had a policy where our SSCV alumni athletes involved at the national team or top collegiate level have an open invitation to participate in training when they are home in Vail.,While SSCV has a significant number of national team and collegiate athletes with exceptional results, the most important aspect of our program is providing the opportunity for Vail Valley children to develop a love of snowsports which hopefully is the platform for lifelong involvement and fostering character, courage and commitment for lifelong success.

Futures Inc., which has been in business for 30 years, has had a location in West Hartford for 16 years, but recently has become much more physically visible in the community.,In West Hartford, The Kitchen at Futures Inc. operates a teaching kitchen that shares space with the offices on South Quaker Lane, and in August 2020, they opened the organization’s third brick and mortar retail location, Good Cause Gifts, which shares space with Nutmeg State Financial Credit Union at 973 Farmington Ave.

Good Cause Gifts also has stores in Berlin and at the Hospital for Special Care in New Britain – and the Kitchen at Futures Inc. also runs the cafe at the hospital.,“One of our biggest goals to opening a store in West Hartford Center was to get our name into the community and share what Futures Inc. and Good Cause Gifts is doing – while also providing another great shopping option for our town,” said DonAroma.,“In addition to shifting to a stronger online presence, simultaneous to opening our West Hartford Good Cause Gifts location, we also built an online store (goodcausegifts.org).,One of the key goals for opening the West Hartford Center store and launching the online store was working with more local vendors and businesses, and Futures Inc. has succeeded on that front as well. read more

MADISON, Wis., Jan. 15, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Locast, America’s only nonprofit, free, local broadcast TV digital translator streaming service, has launched more than 30 local TV channels via the internet – for free – to more than 650,000 residents living in the Madison, Wisconsin, TV market starting today.,For Madison’s tens of thousands of college students – many of them already cord-cutters and cord-nevers – Locast can provide a meaningful link to local broadcast news, emergency information, weather, sports, and entertainment.,A recent six-month disruption of several Madison broadcast channels caused by a broadcast tower antenna replacement underscores the importance of providing an alternative, internet-delivered local channel service like Locast.,As a nonprofit, Locast performs a critical public service by increasing access to local broadcast channels – on the go, over the internet, on any device – to help consumers avoid being cut off from local broadcasts.,Locast delivers more than 30 local TV channels in the Madison designated market area (DMA), including WISC-TV CBS News 3, WMTV NBC 15, WKOW ABC Ch.

The MLK Youth and Children’s Program will be marked Saturday at the Sycamore Youth Center at 301 N. Fourth St., beginning at 9:30 a.m., and include a variety of service projects, the memorial service moves to a virtual platform with the service set for 6 p.m. Sunday at Mount Carmel Community Baptist Church.,The association was organized and created during the 1970s by local citizens, including Mary Ruth Thorn, Eugene Gillison, Delores Wiggins, Anita Jackson and others

“The goal of the MLK Association was to have an annual memorial of the legacy of Dr. King and to keep the ‘Dream Alive’ for the citizens of the Steubenville area,” Baber said.,“Over the past 50 years, the association has attempted to keep the dream alive by the establishment of scholarships for college students, an annual memorial service, an annual reflections of the civil rights movement, a musical of Black songs related to the movement, a prayer breakfast and awarding of monetary gifts to elementary and high school students who write essays regarding Dr. King’s vision and hope for America.”,“The MLK Association annually awards students these gifts in order to encourage students to reflect upon Dr. King’s life and impact of his work during the civil rights movement and of current America,” Baber continued.,“The association is thankful for sponsors such as Huntington Bank, Franciscan University of Steubenville, Jefferson/Eastern Gateway Community College, Steubenville City School District, local governments, local churches, the Sycamore Center and community citizens that have supported the goals of the association over the years,” Baber said, noting anyone can join the nonprofit organization by informing the association’s secretary, Carol Ann Simmons. read more