Instead of teams and coaches, Gtramp has brand sponsorships and athlete meet-ups, with some trampoline companies sending flippers to do their thing in a slew of different countries.,And while some of the brands will host exhibition-like contests—take the Gtramp Games created by Greg Roe Trampoline and cosponsored by trampoline company SkyBound USA—on the whole flippers reject traditional competition-based sporting constructs in favor of an all-inclusive, supportive community.,When it finally becomes reasonable to do so, we set out from our hotel near the Venice Beach Boardwalk, and within a few minutes Maxx spots a kid wearing a pink T-shirt with bold, graphic palm trees on the back.,To hear their parents tell it, Solomon and Andrew have always been natural athletes, both with a tendency to throw themselves into whatever sport they tried.,Solomon started flipping—doing many of the same tricks Andrew was doing on his trampoline in L.A.—and the pair followed each other on Instagram (the Gtramp community was relatively small back then).

Moreover, it's common to create a plan with goals and projects to reach new revenue targets but then fail to plan a way to improve overall productivity and help accomplish those goals.,Second, leaders can't expect success or best results if employees don't have the right tools enabling them to get work done.,Lack of tools can lead to not only less productivity, but also more job dissatisfaction — which could lead to a loss of the right people.,One way to raise overall happiness is to hire happy people from the start.,Recognition, celebrations of success and personal praise can help reward and reinforce happiness rather than create it if your company efficiencies are driven by passionate, happy people with the right resources to get the job done.

By grounding performance and compensation in agency theory, organisations prioritize pay over other motivators such as personal fulfillment and satisfaction, with the greatest emphasis on large pay-off or bonus schemes.,Research conducted over the past 35 years has found little evidence of a significant link between executive pay and performance.,Firstly, executives are more risk-averse than economic theory suggests, preferring clearer pay structures that they can understand and control, over potentially unambiguous but larger pay-offs.,These factors suggest conventional methods of financial reward not only fail to satisfy executives but contribute to inflated pay, rather than regulate it.,After seeing the salary disclosure of her peers, a chief executive is not going to approach the remuneration committee and say, ‘I’m willing to surrender 10% of my pay to enable a fairer playing field'.

Users have to select an account when watching any show on Netflix, and this is something Netflix can leverage by personally addressing you - the viewer - and introducing you to the protagonist.,If the show automatically makes a decision in absence of user making a choice (passive) and makes the show move on, then it seems like there is no additional reward for the viewer to make an actual Active choice.,For Netflix's Bandersnatch currently looks like:

Now again, like games, there is no immediate prospect of Netflix offering a virtual currency as a reward for active user choice (maybe a future prospect).,Done cleverly, Extrinsic rewards work as well as Intrinsic rewards read more

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

Daniel Pink, author of Drive: The Surprising Truth about What Motivates Us, claims that most believe external rewards like money are what motivate people, but his research found that this is an outdated notion.,He concluded that true motivation for the more complex thinking that most jobs now require is driven by three elements: autonomy, mastery and purpose.,He recommended reinforcing the importance of the process rather than the product for students and teachers and warned that data-driven, evidence-based practices in the realm of motivation are unlikely to work.,Extrinsic motivation can undermine intrinsic motivation because extrinsic motivators like incentives, can crumble intrinsic motivators such as the joy of learning.,Pink recommends that teachers focus on creating the conditions where self-directed students can flip on their own switch to learning.

While the commute is a great time to improve your productivity, effectiveness or outlook on working life, you should also take time to treat yourself.,If you’re a regular reader of Hack Your Commute, you’ll know that most of our hacks involve enhancing your productivity, effectiveness or outlook on working life.,So if you’re regularly spending time during your commute on enriching and productive pursuits, it may help your chances of sticking to them if you allow yourself to do something you like once you’ve reached certain targets.,Research published earlier this year by Kaitlin Woolley and Ayelet Fishbach of Cornell University found that offering an immediate reward for a task created greater engagement and intrinsic motivation to complete it, compared with a delayed reward or none at all, because it created a “perceptual fusion” between the two.,Alternatively, if you have a 40-minute commute, you could spend the first 30 on your chosen task and the last 10 on something fun.

INCREASING EMPLOYEE deductibles, copays and premium contributions are obvious, though objectionable, solutions to the problem employers face with mounting health care costs.,A recent article in The Wall street Journal described some of the extremes to which companies will go to deal with the rising cost of health care beyond passing along the cost to workers.,But there is a better way to reduce health care expenses, and it is readily available to employers, large and small: Provide a working environment that nourishes employees, psychologically by training managers and supervisors in a better way to intrinsically motivate their subordinates.,Among the findings: When certain psychological needs are satisfied, leading to the experience of intrinsic or self-motivation, employees perform their work more effectively and with less anxiety.,Managers can do many things to improve worker satisfaction in these areas in a positive way.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting��exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.