As the pandemic abruptly turned life upside down around the world, roughly a million public school kids in NYC were thrust into a wildly inconsistent learning environment, with repeated openings and closings of school buildings and systemwide shifts to online learning as COVID-19 rates surge.,While education officials promise to reopen schools this fall for full-time learning again, many New York City parents and students are calling for more than academic recovery, but a reckoning with the disrupted school system’s mental health toll on kids.,A Year Of Anxiety And Turmoil In the short term after Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that public school buildings were closing on March 16th, 2020 and students were shifting to remote learning, some kids said they initially celebrated a break from school.,Disparate Impacts For New York City’s public school system, whose enrollment is 41% Latino, 26% Black, 16% Asian and 15% white, the deadly toll of the pandemic has been acutely felt: “During the first five months of the pandemic, an estimated 4,200 of 4 million children in the state lost a parent or caregiver to coronavirus, a rate of more than one out of every 1,000, according to a report by the United Hospital Fund and Boston Consulting Group released at the end of September,” with more than half of those affected children residents of the Bronx, Brooklyn or Queens, according to Gotham Gazette, which reported the pandemic has disportionately taken parents away from Black and Hispanic families: 1 out of every 600 Black children, and 1 out of every 700 Hispanic children have lost a parent or caregiver, compared to 1 out of 1,400 Asian children and 1 out of 1,500 white children in New York.,The public school student population is also primarily low-income, a point which was hammered home last spring when the city Department of Education had to scramble to outfit hundreds of thousands of families with devices for remote learning.

Patients with cancer are at increased risk for both suicidal ideation and completed suicide due to a combination of biological and psychological factors that must be addressed to increase quality of life.,Unique to cancer is that the risk of suicide persists more than 15 years past diagnosis.4

In addition to increased suicide risk, patients with head and neck cancers have higher depression scores than the general population even before a cancer diagnosis, leading to the question whether this subset of patients are struggling with a biological cause in addition to diagnosis-related symptoms.5 Complicating these cases is the well-known association of many head and neck cancers with tobacco, alcohol, and other substance use, leading to the question of whether the pre-existing mood disorders lead to substance use that increases the risk of cancer.,Depression is a major risk factor, as it is in the general population, but the cancer population is at higher baseline risk for depression, which has been linked to immunological changes.12 Identification and treatment of depression in cancer patients has been shown to decrease morbidity and mortality.13 read more

Arts Candidates

Nicole de Grano, a third-year political science and women's and gender studies student— running for Students' Council and GFC.,Charles Blondin: I am running for Students' Council because I want to provide a strong and passionate voice for students who may feel that they have no say in their university governance and advocate for better financial support for all university students, as well as seek additional external sources of funding for the Students' Union.,Furthermore, I feel that my previous experience as an open studies councillor and on the Students' Union Council Administration Committee member, along with leadership skills I had developed while serving at Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC), has prepared me for a leadership role within council.,I’ve already done some work in my time in this role, but I believe my work is far from over read more

— High school students in Broward County have a new resource to build the skills to succeed in college and beyond, thanks to a partnership announced today between Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) and the National Educational Equity Lab (Ed Equity Lab), a nonprofit that works to bridge the gap between high school and college for students from low-income backgrounds.,The ambitious initiative, which has reached over 3,000 high school students in 34 cities over the past 18 months, will provide more than 200 students at Title I high schools across BCPS with free access to Yale University’s most popular course, “Psychology and the Good Life,” taught by pioneering cognitive psychologist Dr. Laurie Santos.,In addition to its launch in Broward County, the Ed Equity Lab will deliver and support Yale’s course to students in more than 40 Title I high schools across the country, including in Los Angeles, New York, Baton Rouge, Orlando, Meriden, Connecticut, and Gallup, New Mexico.,In addition to Yale and UConn, other top colleges and universities working with the Ed Equity Lab to provide college credit-bearing courses to talented historically underserved high school students include: Howard University, Cornell University, Arizona State University and Harvard University for the inaugural pilot.,“Our work with universities and districts around the country shows that especially for students in underserved schools, access to actual college courses with real college professors can have a transformative impact,” said Alexandra Slack, Chief of Staff at the National Education Equity Lab.

University College London, where I am an assistant professor of education in the School of Management, has spearheaded initiatives to create innovative programs with the Medical and Life Sciences Faculties across the university’s schools and colleges to train the next generation.,In order to take promising pharmaceutical research and other innovations into the market, it is important for scientists to have an understanding of business and entrepreneurial skills, language and knowledge.,Another area that requires an interdisciplinary approach is the need to train future doctors in management skills.,In 2014, the School of Management developed an innovative module on Medical Policy, Innovation and Management that brings together experts from our school and other departments, to discuss and debate these topics with medical students.,The latter is what has led us to develop a Health Care and Life Sciences portfolio at the School of Management.

It’s been many years, but at one time my daughter Curly Girl had a box full of tiny kittens she’d found in front of the grocery store hidden in her room, and it took me an embarrassingly long time to realize this.,When the kids were younger, I blamed this on swim parties, assuming that they took a towel over to swim at a friend’s house and never brought it home.,In the fall, I even ordered a hotel industry pack of eight white bath towels and gave four each to the kids, telling them, “These are your towels now.,I’m not entirely sure why my son needs three towels per shower, considering he likes to walk around virtually naked the rest of the time, but I can promise you he will never reuse any of them.,That’s why it was so exciting to discover this unexpected cache of bath towels inside the detritus of Cheetah Boy’s closet.

— High school students in Broward County have a new resource to build the skills to succeed in college and beyond, thanks to a partnership announced today between Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) and the National Educational Equity Lab (Ed Equity Lab), a nonprofit that works to bridge the gap between high school and college for students from low-income backgrounds.,The ambitious initiative, which has reached over 3,000 high school students in 34 cities over the past 18 months, will provide more than 200 students at Title I high schools across BCPS with free access to Yale University’s most popular course, “Psychology and the Good Life,” taught by pioneering cognitive psychologist Dr. Laurie Santos.,In addition to its launch in Broward County, the Ed Equity Lab will deliver and support Yale’s course to students in more than 40 Title I high schools across the country, including in Los Angeles, New York, Baton Rouge, Orlando, Meriden, Connecticut, and Gallup, New Mexico.,In addition to Yale and UConn, other top colleges and universities working with the Ed Equity Lab to provide college credit-bearing courses to talented historically underserved high school students include: Howard University, Cornell University, Arizona State University and Harvard University for the inaugural pilot.,“Our work with universities and districts around the country shows that especially for students in underserved schools, access to actual college courses with real college professors can have a transformative impact,” said Alexandra Slack, Chief of Staff at the National Education Equity Lab.

Now, a new and historic philanthropic gift is launching an ambitious research enterprise devoted to the study of human cognition that will supercharge Yale’s neuroscience initiative and position the university to reveal the brain in its full, dynamic complexity.,The gift, made by Yale alumnus Joseph C. Tsai ’86, ’90 J.D., and his wife, Clara Wu Tsai, will establish the Wu Tsai Institute, a new kind of research organization that bridges the psychological, biological, and computational sciences.,“Thanks to the vision and generosity of Joe Tsai and Clara Wu Tsai, Yale will pursue a thrilling new approach to the intensive, long-term study of the brain and the wonders of the mind.,From the maturation of the mind and brain to the development of new cognitive computational models and the study of human behavior, scientists at the Wu Tsai Institute will be working on the very cutting edge of the cognitive sciences.”,A defining feature of the Wu Tsai Institute is the interdependence of these centers, said Turk-Browne, who studies the interaction and development of fundamental cognitive processes in the human brain.

STRATFORD, Conn. — A Stratford woman is under arrest for trying to impersonate an officer while in the nation's Capitol.,U.S. Capitol Police say Linda MaGovern, 63, tried to talk her way through a security checkpoint.,Authorities say the MaGovern drove up to the United States Capitol Police Presidential Inauguration checkpoint at First Street and Columbus Circle Saturday morning.,Capitol Police ordered her to turn the car off and present a driver’s license but instead, MaGovern drove off.,She was processed by U.S. Capitol Police and remains in custody, charged with False Impersonation of a Law Enforcement Officer, Failure to Obey an Officer, and Fleeing a Law Enforcement Officer.

Senior Master Sgt. Michael Lear, AFRS Strategic Marketing Division superintendent, and Master Sgt. Daniel Bedford, AFRS National Events program manager, began working together in 2019.,“I was first introduced to ‘Coach Dan’ (Bedford) through Chief Master Sgt. Michael Johnson (AFRS Chief Strategic Marketing Division superintendent),” Lear said.,Bedford served in the U.S Marine Corps before joining the Air Force Reserve and has a master’s degree in sports psychology, but it was Lear who used his instincts to help Bedford get back in the gym.,“Master Sgt. Bedford’s background in sports psychology is exactly what I needed as I age and require a different training perspective,” Lear said.,Since recovering from his car wreck with the help of Lear as his training partner, Bedford has won the USPA (United State Powerlifting Association) Texas State Bench Press Champion 2020 and the USPA Military National Bench Press Championship.