As the pandemic abruptly turned life upside down around the world, roughly a million public school kids in NYC were thrust into a wildly inconsistent learning environment, with repeated openings and closings of school buildings and systemwide shifts to online learning as COVID-19 rates surge.,While education officials promise to reopen schools this fall for full-time learning again, many New York City parents and students are calling for more than academic recovery, but a reckoning with the disrupted school system’s mental health toll on kids.,A Year Of Anxiety And Turmoil In the short term after Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that public school buildings were closing on March 16th, 2020 and students were shifting to remote learning, some kids said they initially celebrated a break from school.,Disparate Impacts For New York City’s public school system, whose enrollment is 41% Latino, 26% Black, 16% Asian and 15% white, the deadly toll of the pandemic has been acutely felt: “During the first five months of the pandemic, an estimated 4,200 of 4 million children in the state lost a parent or caregiver to coronavirus, a rate of more than one out of every 1,000, according to a report by the United Hospital Fund and Boston Consulting Group released at the end of September,” with more than half of those affected children residents of the Bronx, Brooklyn or Queens, according to Gotham Gazette, which reported the pandemic has disportionately taken parents away from Black and Hispanic families: 1 out of every 600 Black children, and 1 out of every 700 Hispanic children have lost a parent or caregiver, compared to 1 out of 1,400 Asian children and 1 out of 1,500 white children in New York.,The public school student population is also primarily low-income, a point which was hammered home last spring when the city Department of Education had to scramble to outfit hundreds of thousands of families with devices for remote learning.

Sadly, many of us do not feel safe in Cambridge, and it is important to know where we can seek support, should we experience sexual misconduct of any kind.,The Tab has put together a list of resources to raise awareness of ways in which we can seek support or help friends who’ve experienced harassment or assault, to help you best support your welfare and find support should you experience sexual misconduct.,The university has a Sexual Assault and Harassment Adviser (SAHA), who you can arrange an appointment with to talk through your feelings and find further sources of support.,Navigating Cambridge University as a survivor of sexual misconduct

However you respond to your experience of sexual misconduct, your response is valid: there is no right or wrong way to react.,Firstly, you can access counselling services free of charge both through the university or your college, and there are also support groups for people who have experienced sexual misconduct. read more

BRANDON, Fla. — Former NFL wide receiver Vincent Jackson was found dead Monday at a Florida hotel room, days after authorities spoke with him as part of a welfare check, according to the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office.,“My heart aches for the many loved ones Vincent Jackson leaves behind, from his wife and children to the Buccaneers nation that adored him,” Chronister said in a statement posted on social media.,“Mr. Jackson was a devoted man who put his family and community above everything else,” the sheriff said, noting that Jackson, a South Tampa resident, was made an honorary deputy.,Mourning his death, Jackson’s former teams highlighted his dedication to community service.,“During his five seasons with our franchise, Vincent was a consummate professional, who took a great deal of pride in his performance on and off the football field,” Buccaneers owner and co-chairman Bryan Glazer said in a statement, noting Jackson’s work in the community.

YOUNGSTOWN — The Youngstown State University Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion presents the Men of Color Summit Feb. 26 and 27.,The keynote speaker on Feb. 26 is Richard B. Marks Jr., the director of the Cross-Cultural Center and Center for Global Citizenship at Saint Louis University.,Marks is a past chair of the Pan African Network in Association of College Personnel Association, an active member of 100 Black Men of Metropolitan of Saint Louis, board member of YMCA – Monsanto in Saint Louis, past vice president / charter member of National Panhellenic Council of Orange County, and a lifetime member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc.,Giving the keynote on Feb. 27 is Nathan Stephens, a master’s-level social worker and Ph.D. candidate in Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis at the University of Missouri.,Before becoming an assistant professor in social work at Illinois State University, Stephens created the Mizzou Black Men’s Initiative and worked with black male collegians at several institutions and the African American Male Institute by Leadershape.