The last time San Diego elected a moderate Republican mayor with strong potential for appealing to voters statewide, it was Pete Wilson, a onetime state assemblyman who later won election to the U.S. Senate and two terms as governor.,Now, while Californians think about possibly recalling Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom, there’s San Diego’s recently termed-out ex-Mayor Kevin Faulconer, who figures to be on both the recall’s list of possible replacement governors and the state’s June 2022 primary ballot.,With Faulconer as mayor, San Diego was the largest American city with a Republican governor.,Faulconer has sometimes sought to downplay his Republican identity in this state where the GOP label has lately meant certain defeat for anyone seeking statewide office other than the movie muscleman Schwarzenegger.,Faulconer said San Diego cut homelessness after a hepatitis outbreak by sending nurses and paramedics to “every riverbed, canyon and street corner, vaccinated more than 100,000 persons, sanitized streets and built four bridge shelters.”

The pandemic exacerbated the decline of print advertising, an ongoing trend for our newsroom and the industry, but people kept coming to our news because it helped them, brought some joy or added necessary information to an important conversation.,But faced with another mostly virtual semester and a struggling local economy, we had to make a difficult choice as we prepared for the spring:

The Daily Tar Heel is moving to weekly print production.,But the majority of the UNC community won’t be walking through campus this semester, so by shifting our focus away from print, we can concentrate more resources to make our digital news even more relevant and helpful.,As we prepare for the spring semester, know The Daily Tar Heel is strong and ready to be here for you when news happens.,As always: print news, raise read more

The production of the next generation of Matildas has become an increasing concern for Football Australia, whose recent Performance Gap study found a significant lack of depth below the current "Golden Generation" of national team players.,Generation next Sydney FC's Princess Ibini has already shown she's one to watch this W-League season.,(Supplied: Jaime Castaneda/Sydney FC)One of the areas of focus in the report was the availability of competitive match minutes for younger players, finding that the number of W-League minutes played by Australia's youth internationals (Junior Matildas and Young Matildas) has fallen from 60 per cent to 22 per cent over the last decade.,LoadingTrevor Morgan, Football Australia's technical director, says national team staff will be watching this season particularly closely with the aim of encouraging W-League clubs to continue giving opportunities to young Australian players, including the possibility of young player quotas.,(Supplied: Jaime Castaneda/Sydney FC)While they're hesitant to name names, both Dower and Morgan have been impressed with a number of W-League players who were called into the Women's National Team Talent ID Camp held in Canberra last year and who have translated those lessons and expectations into their current performances.