Most of the major shopping centers in Butler and Warren counties are set to welcome more new retail and restaurant tenants this year, helping fill vacant storefronts and creating hundreds of new jobs.,But the $350 million mega retail shopping center is not only working with new retailers to fill the location, it’s also continuing to sign more uncommon tenants to the $350 million mega retail center, including Le Macaron, a French patisserie that opened in December, and Molly’s Cupcakes, which is set to open this month.,The apparent resiliency of Liberty Center and others of its kind is evidence that the closing of big-name stores does not sound a death knell for shopping centers, according to Alex Boehnke, manager of public affairs for Ohio Council of Retail Merchants, which represents more than 7,000 retailers of all sizes across the state of Ohio.,The shopping center, which features more than 100 retailers, will see the debut of skateboarding footwear and related action sports apparel brand Vans in February and announce another new tenant this week, one that will fill the last vacant storefront there, according to Annie Winegardner, Cincinnati Premium Outlets Director of Marketing Business Development.,MORE: Kate Spade outlet store opens this week in Monroe

MORE: Trendy sneaker brand joins Monroe outlet mall store lineup read more

Most of the major shopping centers in Butler and Warren counties are set to welcome more new retail and restaurant tenants this year, helping fill vacant storefronts and creating hundreds of new jobs.,But the $350 million mega retail shopping center is not only working with new retailers to fill the location, it’s also continuing to sign more uncommon tenants to the $350 million mega retail center, including Le Macaron, a French patisserie that opened in December, and Molly’s Cupcakes, which is set to open this month.,The apparent resiliency of Liberty Center and others of its kind is evidence that the closing of big-name stores does not sound a death knell for shopping centers, according to Alex Boehnke, manager of public affairs for Ohio Council of Retail Merchants, which represents more than 7,000 retailers of all sizes across the state of Ohio.,The shopping center, which features more than 100 retailers, will see the debut of skateboarding footwear and related action sports apparel brand Vans in February and announce another new tenant this week, one that will fill the last vacant storefront there, according to Annie Winegardner, Cincinnati Premium Outlets Director of Marketing Business Development.,MORE: Kate Spade outlet store opens this week in Monroe

MORE: Trendy sneaker brand joins Monroe outlet mall store lineup read more

Illinois State Police documents show that the agency frequently assigns troopers to escort sports teams, musicians and even filmmakers across the congested roadways of greater Chicago.,Illinois State Police wouldn’t comment on the trip, so the Tribune made a public records request for all police escort contracts in 2018.,Though critics have called police escorts for sports teams a frivolous and potentially dangerous use of public resources, state police defend them as a way to provide “safety and security for all those involved in the motorcade as well as for the motoring public.”,The contracts show that visiting NFL teams routinely receive police escorts to and from the airport, hotels and Soldier Field.,College football teams are also major customers: Northwestern University had a standing order for police escorts between its team hotel and Ryan Field on game days, and the University of Illinois paid for the service when it played at Soldier Field in September.

Days after Los Angeles City Councilman Mitchell Englander stepped down to take a job with a sports and entertainment firm, more than a dozen candidates are lining up to fill the vacant seat.As of the middle of this week, only a handful had actually filed paperwork with the city to raise money for a special election in June, with a likely runoff in August.,Look whats going on, he said.So far, potential candidates include Englanders former chief of staff, John Lee; former Ethics Commission President Serena Oberstein; attorney and airport Commissioner Jeff Daar; Cal State Northridge sustainability instructor Loraine Lundquist; and U.S. Rep. Brad Shermans district director, Scott Abrams.Many who have expressed an interest are relative newcomers to politics, including Josh Yeager, a Chatsworth resident who works for a public affairs firm; Jack Kayajian, an outreach specialist with the city attorneys office; tech startup founder Brandii R. Grace; and Michael Benedetto and Carlos Amador, both Granada Hills South Neighborhood Council members.Some likely candidates have run for or served in elected office in L.A. or other cities, including Jay Beeber, who previously ran to represent a council district spanning Sherman Oaks to Miracle Mile, and Frank Ferry, an attorney who served on the Santa Clarita City Council.Ben Pak, who unsuccessfully ran for the state Board of Equalization and was a field deputy for former state Sen. Kevin de Len, said he also is considering a run.,And David Balen said he plans to run again after he lost as a write-in candidate against Englander four years ago.As of midweek, only Amador, Ferry, Lundquist, Oberstein, Yeager and another candidate named Annie Cho had filed paperwork with the City Ethics Commission to raise money for the June special election an initial step that more candidates are likely to take as the race heats up.Lee, a Republican, is widely seen as the front-runner because serving as chief of staff has been a common path to the council.,Oberstein and several other competitors argue, however, that the city needs to break with that political dynasty.Its time to bring someone in who hasnt spent a decade with the business-as-usual politics of City Hall, Oberstein said.Lees history with City Hall also could spur questions over a lawsuit from a former Englander aide, who claimed Lee harassed her at work.,Lundquist said she was deeply frustrated that years later, the city did not have adequate analyses or a credible emergency plan.Sonenshein called the council one of the most desirable seats in California government, with an annual salary of over $200,000 and immense power in the sprawling city.Yet Levine said the race will likely have paltry turnout, since it is at a time of year when voters are not used to heading to the polls, and nothing else will be on the ballot.

The shunning, shaving and cutting of the traditional pay TV cord and the ascendance of content via broadband — admittedly another cord that comes into the home — is supported in another survey released in March by consulting firm Deloitte, which found more than half (55 percent) of U.S. households subscribe to at least one video streaming service.,Here's what you need to know More: Netflix in January: Here are the best new family movies and shows to stream The next symbolic milestone — U.S. homes with streaming services surpassing the more than three-fourths (78 percent) that subscribe to traditional pay TV services — could come close to happening in 2019.,The need for content to compete with Netflix and other streaming video services has already led to ATT's $85 billion acquisition of Time Warner, which a federal judge approved in June but the Justice Department is currently appealing, and Disney's $71-billion purchase in July of the Fox movie and TV studios and other assets including Fox's 30 percent stake in streaming service Hulu.,Disney's expanded streaming subscription play "will impact other streaming video providers that previously licensed Disney-owned content — content that will be redeployed exclusively on the new Disney over-the-top (OTT) media services offerings," wrote John Harrison, global media and entertainment sector leader for advisory firm EY in its recently released report.,Consumers are savvy and sensitive to price and value, he says, noting The Diffusion Group's survey found about 21 percent of broadband homes with a pay TV service (traditional or broadband) were at least considering canceling their service in the next six months.

(Photo: Max Ortiz, The Detroit News)

The fallout from the Flint water crisis will continue in 2019, with two top state officials facing trial on charges related to the lead contamination of the city’s drinking water.,Buy PhotoDemocratic gubernatorial candidate Gretchen Whitmer  (Photo: Daniel Mears, The Detroit News) read more

A fired coach at Norwich Free Academy was accused of having sexual relations with two students while he was at the school, and Norwich police say they expect NFA officials may be arrested as well for failing to report him immediately.,Apparently jealous, Kolodnicki, who was a postal carrier and painter well-known and liked in the Norwich arts community, followed Baker and his wife, who had worked together that day, and then started the fight, Kolodnicki’s wife and Baker told police.,- James Hodgdon, a 58-year-old Norwich man, was sentenced in May to 22.5 years in prison for shooting and killing his wife, Dianna Ruthewicz Hodgdon, during a struggle over a shotgun in September 2015.,- Norwich counselor Susan Britt, 47, was arrested in June on charges she billed the government-run Medicaid health care program nearly $200,000 in fraudulent claims through her home business, with more than half of the claims for herself and family members.,- Norwich mother Dolma Dawa, 45, was arrested on a hot afternoon in July after she left her 1-year-old child unattended in a vehicle in the parking lot of a McDonald’s, police said.

A fired coach at Norwich Free Academy was accused of having sexual relations with two students while he was at the school, and Norwich police say they expect NFA officials may be arrested as well for failing to report him immediately.,Apparently jealous, Kolodnicki, who was a postal carrier and painter well-known and liked in the Norwich arts community, followed Baker and his wife, who had worked together that day, and then started the fight, Kolodnicki’s wife and Baker told police.,- James Hodgdon, a 58-year-old Norwich man, was sentenced in May to 22.5 years in prison for shooting and killing his wife, Dianna Ruthewicz Hodgdon, during a struggle over a shotgun in September 2015.,- Norwich counselor Susan Britt, 47, was arrested in June on charges she billed the government-run Medicaid health care program nearly $200,000 in fraudulent claims through her home business, with more than half of the claims for herself and family members.,- Norwich mother Dolma Dawa, 45, was arrested on a hot afternoon in July after she left her 1-year-old child unattended in a vehicle in the parking lot of a McDonald’s, police said.

On June 13, an emergency text alert advising Wyoming Valley residents to “take shelter now” was sent to area cell phones at 9:55 p.m.

Barely five minutes later, 130 mph winds tore a path of destruction across the Arena Hub Plaza and surrounding commercial areas in Wilkes-Barre Township.,It was like raining in the building,” said Joe Stager, manager at at Barnes & Noble in the Arena Hub Plaza who was closing up for the night with employees Mary Zoltewicz, Patrick Abdalla, Rachel Trojan and Tara Steffon as the storm plowed into the store.,Embattled Wilkes-Barre Police Chief Marcella Lendacky retired in June following the March release of a report by the Pennsylvania Chiefs of Police Association that depicted a department in turmoil, with morale at a low point.,More than 10,000 turned out for the Trump rally, which dwarfed a last-minute Nov. 4 “Pennsylvania Votes Blue” Democratic rally that drew Casey, former Vice-president Joe Biden and other candidates to a cramped corridor at Pittston Area High School on a Sunday night.,On the other hand, Reading-based Boscov’s whose Wilkes-Barre store remains a fixture on the downtown business scene, had a very good year. read more

What first arose as a server outage was identified Saturday as a malware attack, which appears to have originated from outside the United States and hobbled computer systems and delayed weekend deliveries of the Los Angeles Times and other newspapers across the country.Technology teams worked feverishly to quarantine the computer virus, but it spread through Tribune Publishings network and reinfected systems crucial to the news production and printing process.,Multiple newspapers around the country were affected because they share a production platform.The attack delayed distribution of Saturday editions of the Los Angeles Times and San Diego Union Tribune.,It also stymied distribution of the West Coast editions of the Wall Street Journal and New York Times, which are printed at the Los Angeles Times Olympic printing plant in downtown Los Angeles.By Saturday afternoon, the company suspected the cyberattack originated from outside the United States, but officials said it was too soon to say whether it was carried out by a foreign state or some other entity, said a source with knowledge of the situation.We believe the intention of the attack was to disable infrastructure, more specifically servers, as opposed to looking to steal information, said the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to comment publicly.,She declined to provide specifics on the disruptions, but the companys properties include the Chicago Tribune; Baltimore Sun; Capital Gazette in Annapolis, Md.; Hartford Courant; New York Daily News; South Florida Sun Sentinel and Orlando Sentinel.No other details about the origin of the attack were immediately available and the motive remained unclear.Tribune Publishing sold The Times and the San Diego Union-Tribune to Los Angeles biotech entrepreneur Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong in June, but the two companies continue to share various systems, including software.Its unclear how many Times subscribers were impacted by late deliveries and the paper could not provide firm numbers, but a source said that a majority received their papers Saturday morning, albeit several hours late.,Programmers worked to isolate the bug, which Tribune Publishing identified as a malware attack, but at every turn the programmers ran into additional issues trying to access a myriad of files, including advertisements that needed to be added to the pages or paid obituaries.After identifying the server outage as a virus, technology teams made progress Friday quarantining it and bringing back servers, but some of their security patches didnt hold and the virus began to reinfect the network, impacting a series of servers used for news production and manufacturing processes.By late Friday, the attack was hindering the transmission of pages from offices across Southern California to printing presses as publication deadlines approached.At one point, Times staffers were making contingency plans to hand-deliver pages from the editorial offices in El Segundo to its Olympic printing plant in downtown Los Angeles.