A view down High Street on the Yale University campus in New Haven, Connecticut, with Harkness Tower at left and Linsly-Chittenden Hall at right.,less

A view down High Street on the Yale University campus in New Haven, Connecticut, with Harkness Tower at left and Linsly-Chittenden Hall at right.,Dwight Hall lies beyond Linsly-Chittenden; both are part of the ... more read more

Two USC athletic department employees a high-ranking administrator and a legendary head coach were fired Tuesday after being indicted in federal court in Massachusetts for their alleged roles in a racketeering conspiracy that helped students get into elite colleges and universities by falsely designating them as recruited athletes.Senior associate athletic director Donna Heinel and mens and womens water polo coach Jovan Vavic were fired after allegedly receiving bribes totaling more than $1.3 million and $250,000, respectively, to help parents take advantage of the relaxed admissions standards for athletes at USC even though their children were not legitimately being recruited as athletes.Former USC womens soccer coach Ali Khosroshahin, who was fired in 2013, and his former assistant coach, Laura Janke, who left the school in 2014, were also named in the indictment for allegedly fabricating athlete profiles for the prospective students.,Khosroshahin and Janke allegedly received payments totaling nearly $350,000 sent to their private soccer club.Federal prosecutors on Tuesday indicted dozens of people including UCLA mens soccer coach Jorge Salcedo and actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin in connection with an elaborate scheme aimed at getting students into elite colleges.The scheme centered around the owner of a for-profit Newport Beach college admissions company that wealthy parents allegedly paid to help their children cheat on college entrance exams and falsify athletic records of students to enable them to secure admission to elite schools for which they otherwise might not qualify, according to court records.We are aware of the ongoing wide-ranging criminal investigation involving universities nationwide, including USC, the university said in a statement.,Donna Heinel and Jovan Vavic have been terminated and the university will take additional employment actions as appropriate.USC is in the process of identifying any funds received by the university in connection with this alleged scheme.,Additionally, the university is reviewing its admissions processes broadly to ensure that such actions do not occur going forward.The other athletic departments named in the alleged racketeering conspiracy are Yale, Georgetown, Wake Forest, Stanford, Texas and the University of San Diego.,The indictment states that, by accepting bribes to falsely designate students as recruited athletes, the coaches and administrators were in the violation of the duty of honest services owed to their employers, thereby facilitating the childrens admissions to the universities.Heinel was USC athletics chief administrative officer and senior woman administrator.Vavic led the Trojans water polo teams to a combined 16 national championships and is a 15-time national coach of the year.Vavic was arrested without incident in Hawaii.

Tom Walker was a quiet and considerate pupil at Monmouth School for Boys and his unexpected death last June, aged just 13, has been felt by the whole community.,Swim for Tom was organised by Tom’s 13-year-old sister Holly, Deputy Head Girl at Monmouth School for Girls, Katie Cameron, and Director of Sport, Miss Lou Scott.,Mr Tom Arrand, Acting Head at Monmouth School for Girls, reflected: “In 20 years of teaching, I have never witnessed a more impressive student-led event than the Swim for Tom.,Tom’s mum, Debbie Walker, said: “If we tally up all of the money raised starting from when Tom and his dad, Tim, did last year’s Brecon Beacons Night Hike, the money in Tom’s fund is £50,931.07.”,The tally includes money raised by Tom’s 11-year-old sister Emily who sang in Cwmbran town centre before Christmas (£229.23), a Christmas charity car park run by pupils in Town House at Monmouth School for Boys (£585), and collections made by a parent.

He is the second black man to die in Bucks Laurel Avenue residence a fact that has stoked outrage and suspicion among activists and community members.Tim Dean, left, and Mark Chambers in Paris during the summer of 2018.,He was in between, like everyone else, said Mark Chambers, who said he met Dean in 1991 through Lambda Basketball League, a gay mens basketball group.Chambers, 54, said he knew Dean as a caring and outgoing friend who preferred to call on holidays and birthdays, not text, and showed up in person when someone was in need.Tim was not reserved.,The pair also played in the same basketball league in L.A. and traveled to Paris for the Gay Games this summer.You mention his name, and even if you didnt spend time with him, you knew who he was and knew him from his smile.For the last three years, Dean had allowed Ottavio Taddei to live in his spare bedroom while Taddei, a native of Italy, worked as an actor and dancer.Taddei said that as roommates they couldnt have been more different separated in age by 20 years and having a different sexual orientation but Dean was welcoming.,Not someone who had a problem.A close friend of Deans had been coping with addiction, and Dean had gone to great lengths to help his friend by giving him food and mediating conversation with the friends family, Taddei said.Chambers said Dean had long ago grown out of any casual drug use.He talked about the years when he was running wild, Chambers said.,Just because he did porn doesnt equal a drug addict.The fact of the matter: Two black males died in the same apartment and the same man is the last person to see them alive, Sanders said.Thats something deeper to look into than what someone did to make money.In recent years, Dean seemed to have abandoned the adult film roles.In 2015, he graduated with his associates degree from Santa Monica Community College, a moment he said was 52 years in the making.I guess something called life and maybe having a little too much fun kept distracting me, he wrote around the time of his graduation.This degree will not change the world but it will be the first degree earned by anyone in my family.He also began attending One LA, a church on La Brea Boulevard, and Taddei said Dean was open about seeking spiritual guidance.That spiritual commitment led him to the rooftop last year, where he wore a black T-shirt that said Truth and stepped into the pool for his baptism.Afterward, he wrote online about the symbolism of the moment: Im surviving thriving in my life right now.Times staff writers Hailey Branson-Potts and Richard Winton contributed to this report.

On the first drive to South Bend, Justin and Jiseop Yoon talked in Korean, like they always do.,Jiseop, 52, arrived in the United States at 13 years old, when his father, a Korean naval officer, sent him to boarding school because they wanted their son to experience the U.S. There, he lived in a foster home and eventually did figure skating at a high level in his native South Korea.,Clockwise from top left: Jiseop, Mihwa, Eric and Justin Yoon.Courtesy of Jiseop Yoon Justin was born in Cincinnati before moving to Korea with his family, where he went to international school.,You're different from all the other kids," Jiseop told Justin.,Justin Yoon kicking for Milton Academy.Photo courtesy of Jiseop Yoon For high school, Justin was sent to Milton Academy, hand-selected by Jiseop because of its academic and equally important athletic fit.

Divided into teams of four, groups were given a box of materials including pieces of gutter spouts of different sizes, lengths of PVC pipe, duct tape, packing materials such as paper and foam of different thicknesses and hardnesses, and shapes and random bits of plastic and cardboard.,“So this way, the kids can’t look at the next group and see what they are doing because they have a different set of materials so they have to look at their problem a little differently,” Kenyon said.,According to Kenyon, BioNetwork is an industry training organization that works to improve the pipeline from students through community colleges programs into industry jobs.,“We work to connect students to potential, whether that is students at a community college or students in high school or middle school and elementary school just to keep them interested in science,” Kenyon said.,Student Mark Ma, of Beijing, said the project forced team members to collaborate,

“We are working with teams, and a lot of people know a lot of things,” Mark said. read more