— High school students in Broward County have a new resource to build the skills to succeed in college and beyond, thanks to a partnership announced today between Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) and the National Educational Equity Lab (Ed Equity Lab), a nonprofit that works to bridge the gap between high school and college for students from low-income backgrounds.,The ambitious initiative, which has reached over 3,000 high school students in 34 cities over the past 18 months, will provide more than 200 students at Title I high schools across BCPS with free access to Yale University’s most popular course, “Psychology and the Good Life,” taught by pioneering cognitive psychologist Dr. Laurie Santos.,In addition to its launch in Broward County, the Ed Equity Lab will deliver and support Yale’s course to students in more than 40 Title I high schools across the country, including in Los Angeles, New York, Baton Rouge, Orlando, Meriden, Connecticut, and Gallup, New Mexico.,In addition to Yale and UConn, other top colleges and universities working with the Ed Equity Lab to provide college credit-bearing courses to talented historically underserved high school students include: Howard University, Cornell University, Arizona State University and Harvard University for the inaugural pilot.,“Our work with universities and districts around the country shows that especially for students in underserved schools, access to actual college courses with real college professors can have a transformative impact,” said Alexandra Slack, Chief of Staff at the National Education Equity Lab.

— High school students in Broward County have a new resource to build the skills to succeed in college and beyond, thanks to a partnership announced today between Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) and the National Educational Equity Lab (Ed Equity Lab), a nonprofit that works to bridge the gap between high school and college for students from low-income backgrounds.,The ambitious initiative, which has reached over 3,000 high school students in 34 cities over the past 18 months, will provide more than 200 students at Title I high schools across BCPS with free access to Yale University’s most popular course, “Psychology and the Good Life,” taught by pioneering cognitive psychologist Dr. Laurie Santos.,In addition to its launch in Broward County, the Ed Equity Lab will deliver and support Yale’s course to students in more than 40 Title I high schools across the country, including in Los Angeles, New York, Baton Rouge, Orlando, Meriden, Connecticut, and Gallup, New Mexico.,In addition to Yale and UConn, other top colleges and universities working with the Ed Equity Lab to provide college credit-bearing courses to talented historically underserved high school students include: Howard University, Cornell University, Arizona State University and Harvard University for the inaugural pilot.,“Our work with universities and districts around the country shows that especially for students in underserved schools, access to actual college courses with real college professors can have a transformative impact,” said Alexandra Slack, Chief of Staff at the National Education Equity Lab.

The Capistrano Valley Christian and Calvary Chapel of Santa Ana high school football teams played a game Saturday, Jan. 16, that might have violated CIF and Southern Section rules as well as state health orders that are in place because of the pandemic.,This appears to be the first reported case in the state this school year of two high school teams playing a game in school uniforms and using school equipment despite guidance from state and high school sports officials against such competitions.,The head coaches for Capistrano Valley Christian and Calvary Chapel, which are both private schools and not part of a school district, confirmed Sunday that their teams played a game Saturday at Calvary Chapel that included full uniforms and spectators but with adjusted rules.,The CDPH has placed high school and youth sports into four tiers that are based on a sport’s level of contact and a county’s COVID-19 infection rate.,On Friday, Jan. 14, hundreds of parents and student-athletes attended Let Them Play rallies in Orange County in an attempt to urge state officials to allow for high school and youth sports to resume as soon as possible.

The Capistrano Valley Christian and Calvary Chapel of Santa Ana high school football teams played a game Saturday, Jan. 16, that might have violated CIF and Southern Section rules as well as state health orders that are in place because of the pandemic.,This appears to be the first reported case in the state this school year of two high school teams playing a game in school uniforms and using school equipment despite guidance from state and high school sports officials against such competitions.,The head coaches for Capistrano Valley Christian and Calvary Chapel, which are both private schools and not part of a school district, confirmed Sunday that their teams played a game Saturday at Calvary Chapel that included full uniforms and spectators but with adjusted rules.,The CDPH has placed high school and youth sports into four tiers that are based on a sport’s level of contact and a county’s COVID-19 infection rate.,On Friday, Jan. 14, hundreds of parents and student-athletes attended Let Them Play rallies in Orange County in an attempt to urge state officials to allow for high school and youth sports to resume as soon as possible.

Now, those stadiums are empty, devoid of fans and players due to the coronavirus and the restrictions placed upon youth sports in the state of California.,On Friday, athletes and their families gathered at area high schools to share the unified message as only sports can.,With coronavirus cases reaching record levels, under state health orders, teams are required to practice social distancing and wear masks as a health and safety measure, a practical impossibility in most team sports.,Tracy High School is one of 80-plus high scuools across California today holding #LetThemPlay rallies, in hopes of California high school sports starting.,Coaches and local elected officials are still sharing their open plea to Gov. Newsom to allow California kids to return to competitive play to keep those families close to home with health and safety protocols to guard against the COVID-19 virus.

The UConn women’s basketball team is adding a player into the mix much earlier than expected.Class of 2021 recruit Saylor Poffenbarger, who signed with UConn in November, has finished high school and will be traveling to Storrs this weekend.,She will be able to practice and eligible to play in games with the No. 4 Huskies following a medical quarantine.The Frederick News-Post initially reported the news Friday morning before the school officially announced it later in the day.Storrs, CT - 2/3/20 - Saylor Poffenbarger, left, and Caroline Ducharme watch the UConn women fall to Oregon on Feb. 3, 2020 at Gampel Pavilion.,Poffenbarger, a guard in the Class of 2021, had already committed at the time of the game, while Ducharme, a guard/forward in the same class, announced in April that she will attend UConn.,But as the chances of playing her senior season at Middletown High became less likely, and the NCAA granted an extra year of eligibility for all college athletes this year, Poffenbarger decided now was the time to start her next chapter.With several COVID-19 metrics at an all-time high locally, the Frederick County Public School system suspended winter sport practices earlier this month and has delayed implementing its hybrid learning model.Poffenbarger isn’t the only early enrollee on the women’s basketball scene this season.,’”The Huskies’ roster now includes seven freshmen and 12 players overall.Poffenbarger’s fellow 2021 signees Fudd and Caroline Ducharme will be finishing the school year at their respective high schools, they told The Courant, while Amari DeBerry has not shared her plans as of now.The Big East announced another game postponement Friday afternoon: UConn will not longer play Providence on Jan. 26, as the Friars have extended their pause in play due to additional COVID-19 related issues.