— High school students in Broward County have a new resource to build the skills to succeed in college and beyond, thanks to a partnership announced today between Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) and the National Educational Equity Lab (Ed Equity Lab), a nonprofit that works to bridge the gap between high school and college for students from low-income backgrounds.,The ambitious initiative, which has reached over 3,000 high school students in 34 cities over the past 18 months, will provide more than 200 students at Title I high schools across BCPS with free access to Yale University’s most popular course, “Psychology and the Good Life,” taught by pioneering cognitive psychologist Dr. Laurie Santos.,In addition to its launch in Broward County, the Ed Equity Lab will deliver and support Yale’s course to students in more than 40 Title I high schools across the country, including in Los Angeles, New York, Baton Rouge, Orlando, Meriden, Connecticut, and Gallup, New Mexico.,In addition to Yale and UConn, other top colleges and universities working with the Ed Equity Lab to provide college credit-bearing courses to talented historically underserved high school students include: Howard University, Cornell University, Arizona State University and Harvard University for the inaugural pilot.,“Our work with universities and districts around the country shows that especially for students in underserved schools, access to actual college courses with real college professors can have a transformative impact,” said Alexandra Slack, Chief of Staff at the National Education Equity Lab.

— High school students in Broward County have a new resource to build the skills to succeed in college and beyond, thanks to a partnership announced today between Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) and the National Educational Equity Lab (Ed Equity Lab), a nonprofit that works to bridge the gap between high school and college for students from low-income backgrounds.,The ambitious initiative, which has reached over 3,000 high school students in 34 cities over the past 18 months, will provide more than 200 students at Title I high schools across BCPS with free access to Yale University’s most popular course, “Psychology and the Good Life,” taught by pioneering cognitive psychologist Dr. Laurie Santos.,In addition to its launch in Broward County, the Ed Equity Lab will deliver and support Yale’s course to students in more than 40 Title I high schools across the country, including in Los Angeles, New York, Baton Rouge, Orlando, Meriden, Connecticut, and Gallup, New Mexico.,In addition to Yale and UConn, other top colleges and universities working with the Ed Equity Lab to provide college credit-bearing courses to talented historically underserved high school students include: Howard University, Cornell University, Arizona State University and Harvard University for the inaugural pilot.,“Our work with universities and districts around the country shows that especially for students in underserved schools, access to actual college courses with real college professors can have a transformative impact,” said Alexandra Slack, Chief of Staff at the National Education Equity Lab.

The MLK Youth and Children’s Program will be marked Saturday at the Sycamore Youth Center at 301 N. Fourth St., beginning at 9:30 a.m., and include a variety of service projects, the memorial service moves to a virtual platform with the service set for 6 p.m. Sunday at Mount Carmel Community Baptist Church.,The association was organized and created during the 1970s by local citizens, including Mary Ruth Thorn, Eugene Gillison, Delores Wiggins, Anita Jackson and others

“The goal of the MLK Association was to have an annual memorial of the legacy of Dr. King and to keep the ‘Dream Alive’ for the citizens of the Steubenville area,” Baber said.,“Over the past 50 years, the association has attempted to keep the dream alive by the establishment of scholarships for college students, an annual memorial service, an annual reflections of the civil rights movement, a musical of Black songs related to the movement, a prayer breakfast and awarding of monetary gifts to elementary and high school students who write essays regarding Dr. King’s vision and hope for America.”,“The MLK Association annually awards students these gifts in order to encourage students to reflect upon Dr. King’s life and impact of his work during the civil rights movement and of current America,” Baber continued.,“The association is thankful for sponsors such as Huntington Bank, Franciscan University of Steubenville, Jefferson/Eastern Gateway Community College, Steubenville City School District, local governments, local churches, the Sycamore Center and community citizens that have supported the goals of the association over the years,” Baber said, noting anyone can join the nonprofit organization by informing the association’s secretary, Carol Ann Simmons. read more