By falling below 7.0, high school football and water polo teams in the county won’t be required to do coronavirus testing before competitions.,Ventura County’s adjusted rate last week was 9.1.,There was a collective sigh of relief from high school football and water polo coaches last week when Los Angeles County’s adjusted rate dropped below 7.0 for the first time since the California Department of Public Health established that as a guideline for youth sports.,It happened last week when Mission Viejo had a positive test in its program and had to cancel its game against La Habra.,If a county goes up and above a rate of 7.0, the testing requirement is immediately restored for football and water polo teams.

With his knee having to be repaired coming off of an ACL injury, King is hopeful to be back in time for Miami’s season opener against the formidable Alabama Crimson Tide.,Douglas DeFelice-USA TODAY Sports

With King out, he can patrol the sidelines and meeting rooms and teach the other players what he knows about leadership.,3- Force Lashlee to adjust his play calling read more

San Clemente High football assistant coach Joe Wood, who was the head coach at Aliso Niguel when it won a CIF championship, died Friday night.,He was Aliso Niguel’s first varsity football head coach.,Wood coached Aliso Niguel from the 1993 season through the 2005 season.,His replacement after the ’05 season was Jeff Veeder, who was an Aliso assistant coach.,Kurt Westling was on the ’96 championship team coaching staff at Aliso Niguel and would later become the school’s third head coach in 2010.

The Capistrano Valley Christian and Calvary Chapel of Santa Ana high school football teams played a game Saturday, Jan. 16, that might have violated CIF and Southern Section rules as well as state health orders that are in place because of the pandemic.,This appears to be the first reported case in the state this school year of two high school teams playing a game in school uniforms and using school equipment despite guidance from state and high school sports officials against such competitions.,The head coaches for Capistrano Valley Christian and Calvary Chapel, which are both private schools and not part of a school district, confirmed Sunday that their teams played a game Saturday at Calvary Chapel that included full uniforms and spectators but with adjusted rules.,The CDPH has placed high school and youth sports into four tiers that are based on a sport’s level of contact and a county’s COVID-19 infection rate.,On Friday, Jan. 14, hundreds of parents and student-athletes attended Let Them Play rallies in Orange County in an attempt to urge state officials to allow for high school and youth sports to resume as soon as possible.

The Capistrano Valley Christian and Calvary Chapel of Santa Ana high school football teams played a game Saturday, Jan. 16, that might have violated CIF and Southern Section rules as well as state health orders that are in place because of the pandemic.,This appears to be the first reported case in the state this school year of two high school teams playing a game in school uniforms and using school equipment despite guidance from state and high school sports officials against such competitions.,The head coaches for Capistrano Valley Christian and Calvary Chapel, which are both private schools and not part of a school district, confirmed Sunday that their teams played a game Saturday at Calvary Chapel that included full uniforms and spectators but with adjusted rules.,The CDPH has placed high school and youth sports into four tiers that are based on a sport’s level of contact and a county’s COVID-19 infection rate.,On Friday, Jan. 14, hundreds of parents and student-athletes attended Let Them Play rallies in Orange County in an attempt to urge state officials to allow for high school and youth sports to resume as soon as possible.

The executive committee for the Central Coast Section, the governing body for high school athletics in five northern California counties — San Mateo, Santa Clara, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Cruz — and a few private schools in San Francisco, approved plans this week for sports teams to return to practice amid the coronavirus pandemic.,A handful of sports are scheduled to return to competition Jan. 25, though no competition can be held until local stay-at-home orders are lifted, and the section left it up to leagues to move the seasons of all sports as they see fit.,The only downside for leagues moving low-contact sports — those allowed to play in the state’s purple tier — into the section’s Season 1 (Jan. 25 start date) is missing out on the possibility of playoffs.,The North Coast Section, which announced its plans Thursday to rearrange its whole schedule to allow low-contact sports first, eliminated playoff plans for both seasons.,But the East Bay’s Diablo Athletic League already announced Friday afternoon that it was rearranging its schedule to move purple-tier sports up in its calendar to allow for more competition.

The executive committee for the Central Coast Section, the governing body for high school athletics in five northern California counties — San Mateo, Santa Clara, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Cruz — and a few private schools in San Francisco, approved plans this week for sports teams to return to practice amid the coronavirus pandemic.,A handful of sports are scheduled to return to competition Jan. 25, though no competition can be held until local stay-at-home orders are lifted, and the section left it up to leagues to move the seasons of all sports as they see fit.,The only downside for leagues moving low-contact sports — those allowed to play in the state’s purple tier — into the section’s Season 1 (Jan. 25 start date) is missing out on the possibility of playoffs.,The North Coast Section, which announced its plans Thursday to rearrange its whole schedule to allow low-contact sports first, eliminated playoff plans for both seasons.,But the East Bay’s Diablo Athletic League already announced Friday afternoon that it was rearranging its schedule to move purple-tier sports up in its calendar to allow for more competition.

Holmes is believed to be one of the first - if not the first - HBCU graduates to hold the general manager position for any major pro sport.,DETROIT — Brad Holmes, Aggie Alum class of 2002, was named executive vice president and general manager for the Detroit Lions of the National Football League.,In his new role, Holmes will oversee the Lions' football operations and will report directly to principal owner and chairman Sheila Ford Hamp.,Holmes is believed to be one of the first - if not the first - HBCU graduates to hold the general manager position for any major pro sport.,After several months of intensive speech and physical therapy, Holmes fully recovered the ability to speak clearly, and was cleared to play football again in May of 2001.

He’s the newest member of the U.S. Men’s National Team but if you have been following the upper echelons of domestic soccer in recent weeks, Tristan Blackmon’s name already may seem familiar.,Three days before Christmas, Blackmon and LAFC were beaten 2-1 by Tigres UANL of Mexico in the CONCACAF Champions League Final also played in Orlando, in a bubble, amid the COVID-19 crisis.,Bob Bradley, the LAFC coach and former coach of the U.S. national team, had cautioned the LAFC players about letting Tigres get a fast break going in transition.,So now Blackmon finds himself competing for a spot on the national team, which is quite an honor, too.,Blackmon is one of 38 players from whom Berhalter will choose and the only new one added to the senior roster of World Cup eligibles.