For Chris Street, a cognitive psychologist and expert in lie detection at the University of Huddersfield, social deduction games are variants on the classic guessing game: Which hand is the coin in?,Where liars can use any number of persuasive tactics to build trust, from pretending to complete tasks in *Among Us* to denouncing other Imposters, figuring out who is a spy need not be simply a case of refining your bullshit More From Games

[#article: think we all hope for some hidden secret ability to root out the truth by detecting subtle behaviors and tells,” says Street.,And when we play a social deduction game like *Among Us*—or Street’s preferred title, [*The already apprehensive.,### Humans Are Not, In Fact, Rational Another reason *Among Us* players make poor decisions is that the design of social deduction games confounds the resources in our brain.,Observers of social deduction games are regularly privy to information that escapes players, possibly because their attention is not being challenged in the same way. read more

So, let me hang a pistol on the wall: government filings show the union representing Orange County’s sheriff’s deputies has piled up nearly a million dollars in order to keep former state Sen. John Moorlach from winning what should be a guaranteed victory in the March 9 election for a seat on the county’s Board of Supervisors.,Chastened for a time, the county’s elected officials temporarily heeded Moorlach’s warning to resist the perpetual demands of government union leaders for more — higher salaries, earlier retirements, richer retiree health plans.,Moorlach was still the county’s treasurer when, in 1999, public officials all over California, like sober alcoholics who can no longer remember their last bender, began acceding to the nonstop union demands for higher public employee pay and benefits.,•••

This pandemic, this frenzy among public officials eager to raise public pay in exchange for campaign support from government union leaders, came even to Orange County.,You can just imagine John Moorlach confronting this Bourbon Street parade, this madness of doubloon-tossing, bare-chested public officials and their union allies just seven years after the words “Orange County” and “bankrupt” were in headlines all over the planet. read more

It’s now Ken’s third marriage and Jan’s second, but to see them together is a lot like watching newlyweds.,That’s according to Jan’s daughter, Linda Orr, who says the couple are so in love, “they cannot keep their hands off each other, they are lovey-dovey all day.,Ken and Jan met again, at San Juan Capistrano South Coast Christian Assembly, where they were both members.,A few months into dating, Ken said, he woke up one morning and “heard a song, and it was as if the Lord was saying marry that woman.”,The couple lived in Ken’s house in Capistrano for a few years before moving to the Village and making the best of their love and their lives.

A slash and burn campaign against the most qualified candidate, John Moorlach, is underway to interfere in the special election for Orange County Supervisor District 2.,A former Orange County supervisor and state senator, Moorlach has been a fiscal watchdog, fighting public sector unions’ abuse of the pension system and working to keep our economy strong.,For decades, Moorlach has been a fierce champion of Orange County residents and has accomplished something rare in politics today: He has repeatedly addressed problems on the horizon before they become cataclysmic policy failures that hurt Orange County.,Time and again, Moorlach has led on critical issues and has proactively worked to protect Orange County families.,Moorlach’s remarkable persistence to do the right thing is in stark contrast to Costa Mesa Mayor Katrina Foley.

The average rate on the benchmark 30-year fixed-rate home loan rose to 2.79% this week from a record low of 2.65% last week.,Long-term bond yields, which can influence interest rates on mortgages and other consumer loans, are climbing this month amid expectations of higher U.S. government spending on pandemic relief and an economy recovery as more people get vaccinated for COVID-19.,The average rate on the benchmark 30-year fixed-rate home loan rose to 2.79% this week from a record low of 2.65% last week, according to mortgage buyer Freddie Mac.,McBride forecasts that the average rate on a 30-year mortgage will rise to 3.1% by the end of the year.,Of course, rising mortgage rates diminish homebuyers’ buying power, especially as home prices continue to rise.