The federal investigation into a massive cheating scandal in which prominent actors and business leaders got their children into elite universities included seeking records from several prominent Southern California prep schools, according to two sources familiar with the probe.The sources did not name the schools but said they are some of the most well-known private institutions in the area.,They said federal authorities issued subpoenas for records involving some of the students involved in the fraud case.One source with knowledge of the investigation stressed that officials are not at this point accusing the schools of wrongdoing but rather seeking information about student performance and other details.The scheme, which began in 2011, centered around the owner of a for-profit Newport Beach college admissions company that wealthy parents paid to help their children cheat on college entrance exams and to falsify athletic records of students to enable them to secure admission to elite schools, including UCLA, USC, Stanford, Yale and Georgetown, according to court records.Fifty people, across academia and college sports as well as a cadre of super-wealthy parents, have been charged in what prosecutors say is the largest college admissions scam ever prosecuted.,He said they knowingly conspired to help their children cheat or buy their children admission to elite schools through fraud.Among those charged were Hollywood actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin.Huffman is in custody in Los Angeles, along with 11 others.,Law enforcement sources told The Times she was flying to Los Angeles to surrender.Loughlin, of Full House" fame, and Huffman, whose credits include the hit ABC show Desperate Housewives, are charged with conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud.,According to court records, Loughlin and her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, the famous creator of clothing brand Mossimo, agreed to pay bribes totaling $500,000 in exchange for having their two daughters designated as recruits to the USC crew team even though they did not participate in crew.Huffman is accused of disguising a $15,000 charitable payment in the bribery scheme, according to court records.

In allegations that sent shock waves through academia, federal prosecutors on Tuesday accused top CEOs, two Hollywood actresses and a legendary fashion designer of taking part in an audacious scheme to get their children into elite universities through fraud, bribes and lies.The scheme, which began in 2011, centered around the owner of a for-profit Newport Beach college admissions company that wealthy parents paid to help their children cheat on college entrance exams and to falsify athletic records of students to enable them to secure admission to elite schools, including UCLA, USC, Stanford, Yale and Georgetown, according to court records.Fifty people, across academia and college sports as well as a cadre of super-wealthy parents, have been charged in what prosecutors say is the largest college admissions scam ever prosecuted.,Some parents participated in one aspect of the scheme, while others paid for both, stealing slots from hard-working students with legitimate grades and test scores, authorities said.William Rick Singer, who owns the admissions company called the Edge College Career Network, was charged with money laundering, obstruction of justice, racketeering and conspiracy to defraud the United States.,In at least one instance, a student claimed to have a learning disability to obtain medical documentation required by the College Board and ACT Inc. to grant additional time on the tests, according to court documents.Once the students were given additional time, which generally allowed them to take the test over two days instead of one and in an individual setting, the clients were instructed to change the location of the exam to either a public high school in Houston or a private college preparatory school in West Hollywood that Singer controlled, according to the documents.At those locations, prosecutors allege, Singer bribed test administrators Igor Dvorskiy, of Los Angeles, and Lisa Niki Williams, of Houston, with the parents money to facilitate cheating on the exams.,Singer had a psychologist on his team assign fake learning disabilities to give students an academic advantage, the charges say.Coaches and private admissions counselors allegedly received money for helping to get students admitted as athletes at Yale, Stanford and USC.USC senior associate athletic director Donna Heinel and mens and womens water polo coach Jovan Vavic were alleged to have received bribes totaling more than $1.3 million and $250,000, respectively, to help parents take advantage of the relaxed admissions standards for athletes at USC even though their children were not legitimately being recruited as athletes.,It described spending thousands of dollars on trips for dental students to help needy Cambodians and offering math tutoring to underserved children in Oakland.Prosecutors said the charity was nothing more than a means to launder money to an array of people requiring bribes.Our contributions to major athletic university programs may help to provide placement to students that may not have access under normal channels, the organization stated in tax documents.Federal law enforcement began the investigation, dubbed Operation Varsity Blues, in May 2018, based on a tip from a confidential source who was being interviewed as part of a separate investigation, said FBI Special Agent Joseph Bonavolonta.Make no mistake: This is not a case where parents were acting in the best interests of their children.

Since the founding of STiR—an NGO that uses networks to motivate teachers and teacher-support officials within governments—nearly seven years ago, we’ve been playing with a proverbial broom, not quite knowing where we best fit within government-run education systems.,Each time, the impetus for testing a new sweet spot wasn’t the result of great internal wisdom; it was pressure from sage leaders within government-run education systems who saw a path we didn’t.,Last year, for example, the Delhi education government system achieved the best academic results in its history, with government schools even overtaking private schools.,But much of the new systems research coming out of DFID’s RISE Education Systems Research Programme and elsewhere shows that demotivated teachers and local officials often fail to internalize and sometimes actively resist strong technical interventions.,For example, the Delhi system initially lacked a well-functioning cadre of officials to run the teacher networks within its large secondary schools.

The Rams have broken hearts and left behind bitter fans in two different cities — in St. Louis, where the team spent 21 years, won a Super Bowl and then split town in a nasty divorce, and in Los Angeles, the nation’s second-largest city and team’s home from 1946 to 1995, where the Rams built and lost a fan base before returning three seasons ago.,A win over the Saints on Sunday and the prospect of a football championship for Los Angeles could bring Rams fever to a boil and carve out a place for the team in the city’s crowded sports scene.,The Rams didn’t have to work quite as hard to build loyalty in St. Louis, where football-starved fans snatched up tickets early in 1995 and were rewarded four seasons later when an unknown backup quarterback named Kurt Warner and tailback Marshall Faulk turned their offense into the so-called “Greatest Show on Turf” and won a dramatic Super Bowl championship in 1999.,A couple of weeks ago, Saints coach Sean Payton hauled in the Lombardi trophy and a big stack of greenbacks to show his team what was at stake…

Tony Hernandez, a third-generation Rams fan from east of Los Angeles, said half of his uncles and many of his friends gave up on the Rams after they moved away.,Hernandez said he briefly quit watching the team during the 1995 season in protest of the move, but soon was back to watching every game and even flying to St. Louis to cheer in person. read more

– Chris Bateman

Bosasa’s former COO Angelo Agrizzi, currently testifying before the Zondo commission of inquiry into State Capture, will blow the lid on high-level corruption, State Capture and money-laundering by his former employer.,As Agrizzi started his testimony, lawyers for the State Capture inquiry were busy on the phones, calling all the big names that the former Bosasa executive is likely to implicate in his testimony.,(Bloomberg) – A former Bosasa executive testified how the South African services company paid millions of rand in bribes to secure and retain security, catering and other contracts from the government and private businesses.,It has previously focused on allegations that members of the wealthy Gupta family exploited their close relationship with Zuma and other officials to loot state companies, but Agrizzi’s testimony indicates that the problem was far more widespread.,The panel viewed video footage showing Bosasa Chief Executive Officer Gavin Watson and three other executives handling a large amount of cash, which Agrizzi said was referred to as “monopoly money” and was used to make the payoffs with Watson’s authorisation. read more

Lamont, right, chats with Willie Murphy, a resident of the Second Stoneridge co-op, during a campaign stop at the ... more

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