In allegations that sent shock waves through academia, federal prosecutors on Tuesday accused top CEOs, two Hollywood actresses and a legendary fashion designer of taking part in an audacious scheme to get their children into elite universities through fraud, bribes and lies.The scheme, which began in 2011, centered around the owner of a for-profit Newport Beach college admissions company that wealthy parents paid to help their children cheat on college entrance exams and to falsify athletic records of students to enable them to secure admission to elite schools, including UCLA, USC, Stanford, Yale and Georgetown, according to court records.Fifty people, across academia and college sports as well as a cadre of super-wealthy parents, have been charged in what prosecutors say is the largest college admissions scam ever prosecuted.,Some parents participated in one aspect of the scheme, while others paid for both, stealing slots from hard-working students with legitimate grades and test scores, authorities said.William Rick Singer, who owns the admissions company called the Edge College Career Network, was charged with money laundering, obstruction of justice, racketeering and conspiracy to defraud the United States.,In at least one instance, a student claimed to have a learning disability to obtain medical documentation required by the College Board and ACT Inc. to grant additional time on the tests, according to court documents.Once the students were given additional time, which generally allowed them to take the test over two days instead of one and in an individual setting, the clients were instructed to change the location of the exam to either a public high school in Houston or a private college preparatory school in West Hollywood that Singer controlled, according to the documents.At those locations, prosecutors allege, Singer bribed test administrators Igor Dvorskiy, of Los Angeles, and Lisa Niki Williams, of Houston, with the parents money to facilitate cheating on the exams.,Singer had a psychologist on his team assign fake learning disabilities to give students an academic advantage, the charges say.Coaches and private admissions counselors allegedly received money for helping to get students admitted as athletes at Yale, Stanford and USC.USC senior associate athletic director Donna Heinel and mens and womens water polo coach Jovan Vavic were alleged to have received bribes totaling more than $1.3 million and $250,000, respectively, to help parents take advantage of the relaxed admissions standards for athletes at USC even though their children were not legitimately being recruited as athletes.,It described spending thousands of dollars on trips for dental students to help needy Cambodians and offering math tutoring to underserved children in Oakland.Prosecutors said the charity was nothing more than a means to launder money to an array of people requiring bribes.Our contributions to major athletic university programs may help to provide placement to students that may not have access under normal channels, the organization stated in tax documents.Federal law enforcement began the investigation, dubbed Operation Varsity Blues, in May 2018, based on a tip from a confidential source who was being interviewed as part of a separate investigation, said FBI Special Agent Joseph Bonavolonta.Make no mistake: This is not a case where parents were acting in the best interests of their children.

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'Mamba mentality': Stolen Kobe Bryant jersey returned after two years A signed Kobe Bryant jersey that was stolen from a display case at his alma mater has been returned after more than two years, according to ESPN.,'Mamba mentality': Stolen Kobe Bryant jersey returned after two years A signed Kobe Bryant jersey that was stolen from a display case at his alma mater — Lower Merion High School in Ardmore, Pennsylvania — has been returned after more than two years, according to a story from ESPN detailing the jersey's unique journey.,The jersey was purchased online by Liu Zhe, a diehard Bryant fan from China, last October for around $2,000 as another piece for his collection commemorating the Los Angeles Lakers legend, according to ESPN.,After buying it, though, Liu said he noticed that the jersey looked awfully similar to the one that was stolen from the high school's display case in 2017, along with other Bryant items.,YOUR DAILY DOSE: Top sports headlines, delivered daily Kobe Bryant photographed on court at Lower Merion High School (Photo: Eileen Blass, USA TODAY) read more

More about the Ohio Prep Sportswriters Association can be found at: DIVISION I GIRLS BASKETBALL ALL-OHIO  PLAYER OF THE YEAR: Kierstan Bell, Canton McKinley COACH OF THE YEAR: Dave Zvara, Avon Lake FIRST TEAM Jacy Sheldon, Dublin Coffman, 5-foot-11, sr., 28.3 points per game; Madison Greene, Pickerington Central, 5-7, sr., 16.0; Constance Chaplin, Euclid, 5-9, sr., 29.0; Kierstan Bell, Canton McKinley, 6-1, sr., 28.8; Sammie Puisis, Mason, sr., 6-1, 17.5; Shyanne Sellers, Aurora, 6-1, soph., 21.0; Jala Johnson, Toledo Notre Dame, 5-8, sr., 16.2; Destiny Leo, Eastlake North, 5-10, jr., 29.4; Destiny Bohanon, Huber Heights Wayne, 5-9, sr., 15.1; Gabbie Marshall, Cincinnati Mount Notre Dame, 5-9, sr., 13.7.,THIRD TEAM Hailey Weaver, Solon, 5-11, soph., 15.0; Anyssa Jones, Westerville South, 5-11, jr., 15.8; Annie Rauch, Hilliard Darby, 6-3, sr., 17.0; Chance Gray, Lakota West, 5-9, fr., 14.8; Hayley Sims, Cleveland Heights, 5-7, jr., 17.0; Hayley Smith, Canton GlenOak, 6-1, jr., 12.0; Corinne Thomas, New Carlisle Tecumseh, 5-9, sr., 22.0; Emily Andrassy, Stow-Munroe Falls, 5-7, sr., 14.1; Audrey Spiker, Dresden Tri-Valley, 5-8, jr., 14.0; Sommer Pitzer, Westerville South, 5-3, sr., 12.3; Destiny McDonald, Lima Senior, 5-5, sr., 15.7.,HONORABLE MENTION Alexis Reese, Euclid; Kaitlyn Kinczel, Mayfield Village Mayfield; Reagan Bass, Strongsville; Alexandria Hunter, Bedford; Amaya Staton, Amherst Steele; Laurene Tere, Cleveland John Hay; Abby Carter, Eastlake North; Kamarah Bender, Warren Harding; Alana Ellis, Twinsburg; Lizzy Stefanov, Stow-Munroe Falls; Chelsea Huffman, Cuyahoga Falls; Nakyah Terrell, Canton McKinley; Jade Abdulla, Canton GlenOak; Emma Dretke, Massillon Jackson; Peyton Davis, North Canton Hoover; Serena Sammarone, Canfield; Raegan Burkey, Youngstown Boardman; Hannah Kroft, Marietta; Kyndal Howe, Dresden Tri-Valley; Lauren King, Dresden Tri-Valley; Breanne Beatty, Worthington Thomas Worthington; Annie Rauch, Hilliard Darby; Imarinah Russell, Dublin Coffman; Reagan Willingham, Ashville Teays Valley; KK Bransford, Cincinnati Mount Notre Dame; Sean Kelly Darks, Cincinnati Walnut Hills; Lexi Fleming, Cincinnati Mercy McAuley; Jillian Hayes, Loveland; Mickayla Perdue, Springfield; CiCi Riggins, Hamilton; Madeline Westbeld, Kettering Fairmont; Katie Thomas, Findlay; Abby Hickey, Toledo Whitmer; Kacee Baumhower, Sylvania Northview; Kylie Griggs, Perrysburg; Halle Barnett, Sylvania Southview; Keyaira Burroughs, Toledo Start.,COACH OF THE YEAR: Kevin Cornell, New Philadelphia FIRST TEAM Annika Corcoran, Gates Mills Gilmour Academy, 5-foot-8, sr., 17.9 points per game; Dayshanette Harris, Youngstown Ursuline, 5-7, sr., 28.3; Mikala Morris, Springfield Kenton Ridge, 6-2, sr., 27.0; Zia Cooke, Toledo Rogers, 5-9, sr., 22.5; Hannah Haithcock, Washington Court House Washington, 6-0, sr., 17.0; Layne Ferrell, Franklin, 6-1, sr., 20.8; Casey Santoro, Bellevue, 5-4, jr., 21.9; Madison Royal-Davis, Toledo Rogers, 5-10, 17.9; Samaria Rodgers-Gossett, Columbus Eastmoor, 5-6, sr., 14.0; Maddie Antenucci, Cincinnati Indian Hill, 5-10, jr., 19.3.,C.H. Washington; Hannah Burnside, Lancaster Fairfield Union; Abby Hatter, Circleville Logan Elm; Laura Manderick, Athens; Zoiee Smith, Waverly; Kayla Burchett, Greenfield McClain; Rachel Cooke, Thornville Sheridan; Josie Ousley, McArthur Vinton County; Kylie Kiger, Wintersville Indian Creek; Josie Pry, New Philadelphia; Addie Rhodes, Minerva; Katie Strama, St. Clairsville; Madison Fields, Steubenville; Macie Jarrett, Zanesville Maysville; Bethany Colling, Duncan Falls Philo; Erin Boehm, Sunbury Big Walnut; Hannah Cowan, Delaware Buckeye Valley; Madison Linn, Hebron Lakewood; Malorie Colwell, London; Kadai Green-Tucker, Columbus South; Abby Jones, Plain City Jonathan Alder; Hailey Jordan, Columbus Eastmoor Academy; Jessica Nation, Olentangy Berlin; Cate Schieber, Granville; Maddy Vincent, Columbus Bexley; Emily Byrne, Cincinnati McNicholas; Clarissa Craig, St Bernard Roger Bacon; Paige Garr, Goshen; Sha’mya Leigh, Trotwood-Madison; Ashleigh Mader, Tipp City Tippecanoe; Chloe Smith, Germantown Valley View; Sky Thomas, Cin.

“Everyone had that mindset coming into the year,” Ty Jerome said Tuesday at John Paul Jones Arena ahead of the team’s departure for the ACC tournament in Charlotte.,“I have fun every year with my team, but this has been a unique group, and we try to really be united more,” Bennett said.,Even after losing ACC Defensive Player of the Year Isaiah Wilkins and All-ACC honoree Devon Hall, the Cavaliers still had the leadership in place to allow themselves to set a new course.,They could fall off and let last year’s ACC regular-season and tournament championships represent the peak of Virginia basketball, or they could renew their internal fortitude and aim for bigger and better things.,Of course, Tuesday’s media availability is likely the last time the team will be this loose and open until its season ends, whenever that end happens to come.

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While it makes intuitive sense that effective goals for fourth graders differ from those made by juniors in high school, it’s important for parents and coaches to understand how to help youth athletes make and achieve appropriate goals.,In addition to an athlete’s competitive or training maturity, Dr. Kraus encourages parents and coaches to consider the source of an athlete’s motivation when it comes to establishing appropriate goals.,If an athlete exhibits high intrinsic motivation early on by prioritizing personal achievement and what success feels like rather than what it looks like, then coaches and parents can help the athlete progress by encouraging the pursuit of extrinsic goals (winning).,In her experience, Dr. Kraus says young athletes tend to impose harsher consequences on themselves for perceived failures compared to the consequences parents and coaches would normally deem reasonable.,To counter the bias toward criticism, coaches and parents should encourage young athletes to establish concrete consequences and rewards related to effort (not outcomes). read more

A high-profile incident involving Oklahoma City Thunder guard Russell Westbrook and a heckling fan highlights the sometimes overly-close physical proximity between NBA fans and the targets of their derision.,On Monday night, Westbrook and 45-year-old Shane Kiesel exchanged insults during the second quarter of the Thunder’s game with the Jazz in Vivint Smart Home Arena.,Westbrook explained after the game that Kiesel’s insult is the latest in a series of disdainful remarks by fans aimed at him and other NBA players when playing in road arenas.,First, Kiesel and several other fans in Vivint Smart Home Arena were issued co-called “warning cards” pursuant to the NBA’s Fan Code of Conduct.,In addition to the Fan Code of Conduct, the uniform player contract signed by every NBA player contains provisions that empower commissioner Adam Silver to punish Westbrook.

- Paul Carcaterra

“You could put him on a field with professional players, or play at the international level and he would score three or four goals in a game right now as a 16-year-old.,“When I watch Mikey Powell, or Lyle Thompson or Brennan O’Neill play the game, there’s nothing traditional about their game.,O’Neill, a junior at St. Anthony’s (N.Y.) High School, was once the earliest boys’ lacrosse player ever to commit to a college program — making the pledge to Penn State as an eighth-grader in 2016 before flipping his commitment to Duke in September.,After games, O’Neill would come home to watch YouTube videos of Mark Matthews and John Grant Jr., then head out to the backyard to test their moves.,It took a meeting with coach Joe Spallina at a Pro Player Lacrosse Camp to give O’Neill that impression. read more

With its win at No. 20/19 Cincinnati on Sunday afternoon, No. 12/12 Houston claimed the outright American Athletic Conference regular season title and will be the No. 1 seed in the 2019 Air Force Reserve American Athletic Conference Men’s Basketball Championship, held March 14-17 at FedExForum in Memphis, Tenn.,Houston has been a top-three seed in The American Championship in each of the past three seasons and will take on the winner of No. 8 Tulsa and No. 9 UConn on Friday, March 15 at noon ET/11 a.m. CT.,The Bulls played their last two games without starting point guard Laquincy Rideau who should be ready to make his return on Thursday, March 14 when USF faces No. 9 UConn in first game of the 2019 Championship at 1 p.m. ET/noon CT.,With the Huskies’ regular-season finale victory against the Pirates, UConn will take on No. 8 USF in the tip-off game of the tournament on Thursday, March 14 at 1 p.m. ET/noon CT.,No. 9 UConn vs. No. 8 USF, 1 p.m. ET/noon CT (ESPNU)

No. 12 Tulane vs. No. 5 Memphis, 3 p.m. ET/2 p.m. CT (ESPNU) read more

With the shutdown of the newspaper in September 2018, this area in central Missouri's Ozark hills joined more than 1,400 other cities across the United States to lose a newspaper over the past 15 years, according to an Associated Press analysis of data compiled by the University North Carolina.,With the shutdown of the newspaper in September 2018, this area in central Missouri's Ozark hills joined more than ... more

Photo: Orlin Wagner, AP read more

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — An LA high school basketball coach is in the fight of his life against stage four cancer and his battle has inspired his team from Roybal High School to go undefeated going into the playoffs this season.,There were two defining moments in the Roybal Titans’ season — the December afternoon when Coach Danny O’Fallon told them he had stage four intestinal cancer and the game last week when after losing the lead with a minute to go, they scrambled to win the first city title in school history.,Who refused to say no and a coach who led them, pleading with the school to let him keep coaching after a grim diagnosis.,We have to win for coach,” said Roybal senior Elijah Wescott.,And in the end with the city title on the line, the Titans and their coach persevered until the moment when Coach O’Fallon collapsed from joy and exhaustion.