In addition:

William Rick Singer, 58, of Newport Beach, Calif., owner of the Edge College Career Network and CEO of the Key Worldwide Foundation, was charged in an information with racketeering conspiracy and money laundering.,John Vandemoer, 41, of Stanford, Calif., the former sailing coach at Stanford University, was charged in an information with racketeering conspiracy.,Charged with racketeering conspiracy: read more

In allegations that sent shock waves through academia, federal prosecutors on Tuesday accused top CEOs, two Hollywood actresses and a legendary fashion designer of taking part in an audacious scheme to get their children into elite universities through fraud, bribes and lies.The scheme, which began in 2011, centered around the owner of a for-profit Newport Beach college admissions company that wealthy parents paid to help their children cheat on college entrance exams and to falsify athletic records of students to enable them to secure admission to elite schools, including UCLA, USC, Stanford, Yale and Georgetown, according to court records.Fifty people, across academia and college sports as well as a cadre of super-wealthy parents, have been charged in what prosecutors say is the largest college admissions scam ever prosecuted.,Some parents participated in one aspect of the scheme, while others paid for both, stealing slots from hard-working students with legitimate grades and test scores, authorities said.William Rick Singer, who owns the admissions company called the Edge College Career Network, was charged with money laundering, obstruction of justice, racketeering and conspiracy to defraud the United States.,In at least one instance, a student claimed to have a learning disability to obtain medical documentation required by the College Board and ACT Inc. to grant additional time on the tests, according to court documents.Once the students were given additional time, which generally allowed them to take the test over two days instead of one and in an individual setting, the clients were instructed to change the location of the exam to either a public high school in Houston or a private college preparatory school in West Hollywood that Singer controlled, according to the documents.At those locations, prosecutors allege, Singer bribed test administrators Igor Dvorskiy, of Los Angeles, and Lisa Niki Williams, of Houston, with the parents money to facilitate cheating on the exams.,Singer had a psychologist on his team assign fake learning disabilities to give students an academic advantage, the charges say.Coaches and private admissions counselors allegedly received money for helping to get students admitted as athletes at Yale, Stanford and USC.USC senior associate athletic director Donna Heinel and mens and womens water polo coach Jovan Vavic were alleged to have received bribes totaling more than $1.3 million and $250,000, respectively, to help parents take advantage of the relaxed admissions standards for athletes at USC even though their children were not legitimately being recruited as athletes.,It described spending thousands of dollars on trips for dental students to help needy Cambodians and offering math tutoring to underserved children in Oakland.Prosecutors said the charity was nothing more than a means to launder money to an array of people requiring bribes.Our contributions to major athletic university programs may help to provide placement to students that may not have access under normal channels, the organization stated in tax documents.Federal law enforcement began the investigation, dubbed Operation Varsity Blues, in May 2018, based on a tip from a confidential source who was being interviewed as part of a separate investigation, said FBI Special Agent Joseph Bonavolonta.Make no mistake: This is not a case where parents were acting in the best interests of their children.

“Everyone had that mindset coming into the year,” Ty Jerome said Tuesday at John Paul Jones Arena ahead of the team’s departure for the ACC tournament in Charlotte.,“I have fun every year with my team, but this has been a unique group, and we try to really be united more,” Bennett said.,Even after losing ACC Defensive Player of the Year Isaiah Wilkins and All-ACC honoree Devon Hall, the Cavaliers still had the leadership in place to allow themselves to set a new course.,They could fall off and let last year’s ACC regular-season and tournament championships represent the peak of Virginia basketball, or they could renew their internal fortitude and aim for bigger and better things.,Of course, Tuesday’s media availability is likely the last time the team will be this loose and open until its season ends, whenever that end happens to come.

Waterford High had its four-year Final Four streak snapped with a loss to Peebles in the Division IV district finals this year, but it was still an incredible season for the Wildcats, who finished 20-5 overall and 16-0 in the Tri-Valley Conference Hocking Division.,Waterford was rewarded with a pair of players on the first team All-Southeast District list, one the second team and one in special mention.,In Division II, Warren saw junior Molly Grayson and sophomore Olivia Alloway both earn third team all-district honors.,On the boys side, Warren’s Seth Dennis and Waterford’s Russ Young each earned first team all-district honors.,Marietta High saw senior Austin Witucky take third team honors in Division II.

For the eleventh time in his career, Donny Schatz of Fargo, North Dakota, was voted the “Driver of the Year” by the North American 410 Sprint Car Poll voting panel of media members, promoters, sanctioning officials and manufacturers.,California’s Colby Johnson is the “Rookie of the Year” Award recipient in the ‘410’ division of the North American Sprint Car Poll.,Jack and Bonnie Elam of JJ Auto Racing (their 14th such award) will receive “Builder/Manufacturer of the Year” honors for the ‘410’ poll.,Past recipients of the North American Sprint Car Poll’s “Outstanding Contribution to the Sport Award” are as follows: Dave Pusateri, the late Bryan Clauson, Dave Darland, Sammy Swindell, Fred Rahmer, Johnny Gibson, the late Jerry Reigle, Steve Sinclair, Kasey Kahne, Tom Schmeh, Dick Jordan, the late Fred Brownfield, Doug Auld, the late Hank Gentzler, Tony Stewart, Emmett Hahn, Allan Holland, Dave Argabright, Ron Shuman, the late Kevin Gobrecht, Jack Hewitt, the late Jack Miller, Brad Doty, Art Carol Malies, Dave Bowman, the late Ralph Capitani, the late Ted Johnson, Mark Kuchan, Steve Kinser, the late Don Martin, Steve Beitler, Lee Brewer, Jr., Mark Kinser, Frank Lewis, the late Earl Baltes, Casey Beverly Luna, Elayne Hoff, Jean Lynch, the late J.W. Hunt, and Bert Emick.,`Brent Marks, `Myerstown, PA, `34 First Place Votes - Donny Schatz 16; Brad Sweet 2; Greg Hodnett 1.

This edition, from Feb. 18, has been made available in archived form …

USC and UCLA: ‘Glory Daze’ read more

Beasley did just that, keeping his finals opponent — Norwell senior Kade Zadylak — raised off the mat often enough to take away some of his scoring chances on the way to an 11-5 victory and a berth in the first round of the State Finals Friday at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis.,Lone defeated Fort Wayne Snider senior Vertis Hawkins by 18-3 technical fall, Mississinewa junior Kyler Funk 8-5 and Garrett senior Austin Leech by 13-0 major decision before losing 3-2 to Jay County junior Mason Winner in the finals.,Senior Adam Hooley (145) and sophomore Ibrahim Khaoucha (195) of Northridge, junior Rasheek Bonds (120) of Goshen, seniors Brandon Bergman (182) and Brian Bergman (285) of Lakeland and senior Isaac Weimer (113) and junior Kyler Brown (126) of West Noble all lost in the second round.,Bowing out in the first round were freshman Jasper Graber (106), sophomore Justin Puckett (113) and junior Caid Lacey of Northridge, freshman Nick Olson (106), seniors Christian Santos (132) and Braxton Rodriguez (138) and junior Kaleb Kilmer (220) and Jose Rosales (285) of Goshen, freshman Ben Miller (113) of Lakeland and junior Shayne Tierney (145) of West Noble.,FORT WAYNE SEMISTATE Team scores: Jimtown 64.5, Huntington North 64, Yorktown 47, Central Noble 44, Oak Hill 41, Fort Wayne Carroll 36, Bellmont 35, Adams Central 32, Western 32, Rochester 31.5, Garrett 28, Norwell 28, Leo 26, Jay County 25, Wabash 24, Prairie Heights 21.5, Homestead 21, Northridge 21, Fairfield 16, NorthWood 15, Columbia City 11, Madison-Grant 11, Manchester 11, Fort Wayne Snider 10, Bluffton 9, Churubusco 8, Eastern 8, Monroe Central 7, Angola 6, Delta 6, East Noble 4, Southern Wells 4.

R.C. Slocum spent nearly three decades coaching football at Texas AM, and if the rules changed, recruiting didn't.,But money, social media and the pursuit of national glory changed recruiting in the Lone Star State, at least at Texas and AM.,For the first time in 20 years, Texas, AM and Oklahoma will finish in the top five of the 247Sports' composite recruiting rankings.,Now that recruiting budgets at Texas and AM have climbed into seven figures, it's easier for coaches to go national as well as fly recruits in for visits.,Besides 10 Texas recruits this year, he signed players from Georgia, California, Kansas, North Carolina, Arizona, Arkansas, Tennessee, Florida and Washington D.C.

NEW YORK CITY — The Oklahoma men's and women's track and field teams wrapped up a pair of meets across the country on Saturday.,At the historic New York City Armory, both the men's and women's teams finished in sixth place overall.,On the women's side, OU saw freshman Haley Herberg finish as runner-up with a time of 9:24.53, putting her sixth in the Sooners' all-time top-10 3K marks.,Sophomore Dai'lyn Merriweather ran an indoor personal-best 55.52 to earn fifth place, while freshman Kennedy Blackmon finished eighth at 55.96 in her collegiate 400-meter debut.,Earlier in the weekend, freshman Kristo Simulask took second place in the heptathlon, recording the third-best score on OU's all-time top-10 performance list at 5.506 points.

There is a plaque on the wall of a newly-built Kenyan school hall that reads: "Donated by friends and family, in loving memory of Jock Hobbs, 7th January 2019".,The plaque is but one strand to Hobbs' journey that has pulled together supporters from the United States and New Zealand, and seen his close friend, NFL safety Kenny Vaccaro, embroiled in a standoff with US President Donald Trump after protesting police brutality and racial injustice by sitting with 10 team-mates during the national anthem.,Hobbs in his playing days at North Harbour ... a visit to Kenya changed his view of the world.,His professor, Glenn Kramon, identified the value in the message, and under the title "The collateral damage of a petty NFL", Hobbs' piece was published in the New York Times.,The piece turned heads, sparking feedback and financial support from the New Zealand and US communities that pushed Hobbs' project over the line.