James Brown ‘a great guy to work with’

Former Hamilton and Middletown Schools Principal James Edward Brown cared deeply about students and preparing the next generation of school leaders during his decades in education.,A former Hamilton Citizen of the Year, Brown died Dec. 4 after an illness that saw him return to his hometown of Sandusky, Ohio to live out his last days in a hospice care center.,He was named Hamilton’s Citizen of the Year in 1989, received the Southwestern Ohio Administrator Award, was honored with a “Jim Brown Day” in Hamilton.,Elsa Croucher ‘brought attention to abuse’ read more

In their first season in Indianapolis, head coach Frank Reich, left, and offensive coordinator and Jamestown native Nick Sirianni have guided the Colts into the playoffs.,Father Fran, a member of the Chautauqua Sports Hall of Fame, coached Southwestern High School from the mid-1970s to the early 1980s; brother Mike is the head coach at Washington & Jefferson College where he has compiled one of the best winning percentages in the NCAA; and brother Jay coached Southwestern to a pair of New York State Public High School Athletic Association championships in 2008 and 2009.,Once the youngest Sirianni arrived at the University of Mount Union, he played for Larry Kehres, who guided the Purple Raiders to 11 national championships in his career.,Upon his graduation, Sirianni began his climb up the coaching ranks with stops at Mount Union, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, the Kansas Chiefs and the San Diego/Los Angeles Chargers, before joining Reich’s staff in Indianapolis last February.,“One of the reasons I’m in the position I’m in now is because of the successful coaches I’ve been around, starting with growing up in a coach’s house, learning how to coach with my brothers, and then, obviously, playing for the most successful coach in NCAA football history in Larry Kehres,” he told The Post-Journal last October.

And it should serve as a reminder to the rest of the  AFC playoff field that even though the Patriots may have looked vulnerable at times this season, and even though Brady himself may not be the MVP quarterback he was a year ago, and even though New England has some shaky losses on its record, the fact is that Bill Belichick’s team is back where it always is: playing meaningful football in January.,Over the past seven seasons, the Patriots have gone 7-0 in the divisional round, winning by an average of 17 points per game.,But if the Texans can come up with a timely interception or two — the way they did in Foxboro during a playoff game two years ago — then it could lead to some tense moments in Foxboro for the home team.,They led the AFC with over 150 rushing yards per game and 19 rushing touchdowns on the season.,They ranked first in the NFL in yards allowed (293/game), second in points allowed (17.9/game), fourth in rushing yards allowed, fifth in passing yards allowed, third in third-down defense and second in opponent passer rating.

Pat Carruthers speaks next to a photo of his late wife Donna during a ribbon cutting ceremony and open house for the Donna Y. Carruthers Manor House at Berkeley Square Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2012, in Hamilton, Ohio.,James Brown ‘a great guy to work with’

Former Hamilton and Middletown Schools Principal James Edward Brown cared deeply about students and preparing the next generation of school leaders during his decades in education.,A former Hamilton Citizen of the Year, Brown died Dec. 4 after an illness that saw him return to his hometown of Sandusky, Ohio to live out his last days in a hospice care center.,He was named Hamilton’s Citizen of the Year in 1989, received the Southwestern Ohio Administrator Award, was honored with a “Jim Brown Day” in Hamilton.,Elsa Croucher ‘brought attention to abuse’ read more

WOODBURY, CT — Town officials and residents are dealing with the loss of First Selectman William Butterly who died after a suspected heart attack over the weekend.,Before becoming first selectman Butterly served on the Board of Finance, was a state representative in the 76th district, chaired the Watertown Town Council and was a police and fire commissioner for the Town of Woodbury.,In the ensuing years Bill became the Chairman of the Watertown Town Council, rejoined the Watertown Fire Department, served as a Police Commissioner and opened his successful real estate company, Butterly Realty.,Bill is survived by his wife Judy; his sister Judy (Don) Schmaling; brothers Barry (Reenee) Butterly, Sean (Dinah) Butterly, Chuck (Sheila) Butterly; former sister-in-law Judy Butterly of California; brother-in-law Charles Collins of Torrington; nephews Patrick (Wanda) Butterly, Timothy Butterly, Donald (Britanny)Schmaling; Jeffrey (Amanda) Schmaling.,As parking is somewhat limited, please check their website for parking options

Donations in Bill's name may be made to Woodbury Community Services Council, P.O. Box 585, Woodbury CT 06798; St. Vincent DePaul Homeless Shelter, P.O. Box 1612, Waterbury CT 06721; or either the Woodbury or Watertown Volunteer Fire Department. read more

Lamont, right, chats with Willie Murphy, a resident of the Second Stoneridge co-op, during a campaign stop at the ... more

Photo: Christian Abraham / Hearst Connecticut Media read more

• OU is making its 20th consecutive bowl bid, by far the longest streak in school history (the previous record was eight from through the 1982 seasons under Barry Switzer).,• This marks the fourth straight season Oklahoma has won at least seven consecutive games heading into its bowl contest (seven in 2015, nine in 2016, eight in 2017 and seven this year).,• Only one OU team (51.1 in 2008) averaged more points per game for a season than this year's squad is averaging (49.5).,• Oklahoma has rushed for at least 300 yards and passed for at least 300 in a game a school-record five times this year (the previous record was two times in 2012), including in four of the last six contests.,• Brooks has carried the rushing load for OU over the last four games, running 71 times for 546 yards (7.7 per rush) and six touchdowns.

But Rudnick is among a growing number of consumers who are turning to over-the-air digital antennas a one-time investment of as little as $20 as a way to slash their monthly video subscription costs.Research firms and electronics manufacturers say cord-cutting consumers such as Rudnick have driven up TV antenna sales and usage in recent years.,These value-conscious streamers, as they are known in the industry, are willing to cobble together a mosaic of video sources to replace the traditional pay TV bundle, which now costs an average of $107 a month, according to a recent study by the Leichtman Research Group.This year, 8.1 million over-the-air TV antennas will be delivered to retailers in the U.S., up 2% from last year and 8% over 2016, according to the Consumer Technology Assn.Nielsen estimates that 13.8% of U.S. homes depend on antennas to get their TV, up from 10.3% in 2014.,Research firm GfK North America puts the number of over-the-air TV homes at 16.4 million.The rapid acceleration of cord-cutting has put heavy pressure on the cable industry and media companies that own pay TV channels that depend on the steady revenue stream that subscribers provide.,The number of consumers whove canceled traditional pay TV service is expected to climb 33% to nearly 25 million this year, according to estimates from research firm eMarketer.Though worrisome for Hollywood, the trend has been a boon to antenna manufacturers like Channel Master.,Station ownership groups and the media conglomerates get a cut of pay TV subscriber fees, giving them little incentive to promote over-the-air antenna use.Consumers largely have to depend on manufacturer websites or blogs such as Cordcutters.com to learn which channels are available over the air in their area and which antenna is right for them.We do a terrible job of explaining that your local stations are available over the air for free, said Neal Sabin, vice chairman of Weigel Broadcasting, a Chicago-based TV station group.

Nearly two years later, Corey Kiefer and Jacob Zamora, both 24, pleaded no contest to felony vehicular manslaughter and were sentenced to six years in prison, the maximum term.Jacob Zamora, right, and Corey Kiefer appear in Norwalk court, where they pleaded guilty to vehicular manslaughter for their involvement in a December 2016 street race that left Natalie Volkoff dead.Since 2009, authorities in Los Angeles County have made arrests in more than half the cases where street racing was suspected in a fatal car crash.,"Our court system isn't going to care until more people start to die," said an LAPD police investigator who requested anonymity in order to speak candidly about the issue.In Los Angeles County, where authorities say that street racing is on the rise, at least 179 people died in suspected incidents from 2000 to 2017, according to the Times analysis.Late last year, street racing was suspected in a crash in Northridge that killed four people when a 20-year-old lost control of a BMW and crashed into a tree.,The death toll has extended to 2018, including an incident in which a man was killed and a woman seriously injured when their sport utility vehicle was struck by a car involved in a street race near downtown in July, police said.Some families that have lost relatives feel robbed that criminal cases started out with a murder charge and ended with what they see as a slap on the wrist.A 2010 collision between two vehicles racing through Long Beach left four people dead, including 32-year-old Candace Ann Bustamante.The driver of the vehicle that smashed into Bustamante, Denis Alberto Reyes, was sentenced to 17 years and eight months in state prison after pleading no contest to four counts of gross vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated.,The California Highway Patrol meanwhile, documented 984 street racing incidents in Los Angeles County in 2017, records show.Los Angeles is the hub of street racing activity in the county, and several investigators said they believed the cases submitted by the LAPD represent just a fraction of the illegal activity taking place on city streets.Much of that driven by popular culture and social media is in the form of organized takeover events, where people use their cars to block off streets or intersections to stage races or stunts that can attract hundreds of onlookers.Three people, including a 15-year-old, were killed in Commerce in 2015 after a car doing doughnuts in the street collided with another vehicle, striking spectators.The low number of racing cases filed by the LAPD is a point of frustration for some investigators tasked with tackling the city's burgeoning street takeover scene.Arresting and prosecuting participants is hampered by the chaotic nature of the events, according to Capt. Andy Neiman, who oversees traffic operations at the LAPD's Valley Bureau.Its very challenging, tactically, to try to control a crowd that is engaged in street racing.,"Earlier this year, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office filed assault charges against seven men who allegedly threw bottles at an LAPD cruiser and tried to stop officers from making arrests at the scene of a South L.A. street takeover.

Buy Photo Vero Beach’s Tommie Lewis (3) shoots over Tampa Bay Tech’s David Cexil (5) Saturday, Dec. 30, 2017, during their high school boys basketball championship game at the Holiday Hoopla Tournament at Vero Beach High School.,(Photo: JEREMIAH WILSON/TCPALM)Buy Photo

Here are 10 things you may not know about the Holiday Hoopla, the long-running Vero Beach High School boys basketball tournament.,Buy PhotoFort Pierce Central players and coach James Dawson (back row, far right) celebrate their second consecutive Holiday Hoopla title in 2010, defeating Vero Beach in what remains the only final matching area teams.,Local wins hard to come by Aside from Fort Pierce Central's two Hoopla titles, area teams not named Vero Beach are a combined 28-44 in the tournament.,Buy PhotoCoach Chuck Loewendick guided Vero Beach High School's boys basketball team to 11 of its 14 Holiday Hoopla titles during his 29-year run from 1988 to 2017. read more