Starting Monday, the Los Feliz native will host Daily Wager, a daily program on ESPNews airing at 3 p.m. and available for streaming on the ESPN app.Its the first regularly scheduled program from the Walt Disney Co.s sports media behemoth solely dedicated to gaming-related information and data on upcoming contests, and it likely wont be the last as legal sports betting spreads throughout the country.The Supreme Court ruling in May that legalized sports betting is expected to be a boost for sports talk shows, which are the low-cost moneymakers for outlets that need programming to supplement their live play-by-play telecasts.,Open discussion of odds, point spreads and other analytical data related to wagering on pro and college games each night could potentially energize the format for an audience that has a financial stake in the outcomes.The changes in the law open up an entirely new genre of entertainment, said Patrick Rishe, director of the sports business program at Washington University in St. Louis.Other sports networks are already on the bandwagon.,WarnerMedias digital sports website Bleacher Report announced last month that it is building a studio inside Caesars Palace in Las Vegas where it will produce gaming-related content.But as the countrys leading source of sports programming, ESPN, with its entry into gaming-themed shows, is marking the strongest indication yet of an attitudinal shift toward a once-verboten subject on which sports TV coverage has traditionally tread lightly.A daily ESPN show is an important milestone, said Lee Berke, president of the consulting firm LHB Sports, Entertainment Media.,ESPNs SportsCenter with Scott Van Pelt has a popular segment called Bad Beats, which humorously focuses on heartbreaking, last-minute plays that result in teams failing to cover the spread.Van Pelt sidekick Steve Coughlin will be one of the contributors to Daily Wager along with ESPN radio host Chris The Bear Fallica, ESPN.com gambling industry reporter David Purdum, Las Vegas-based handicapper Preston Johnson, fantasy football analyst Anita Marks and sports betting expert Joe Fortenbaugh.Rishe believes programs that provide usable data for bettors have the potential to draw younger viewers who have drifted away from traditional TV for sports news.,After graduating with a degree in economics from Brown University, he immersed himself in the analytics and data related to gaming and became an expert as a sports journalist in Las Vegas, where the home team is betting, he said.While wager-related data crunched by ESPNs statistic and information group will line the screen during Daily Wager, Kezirian said the programs content will still be accessible to the non-betting fan.Were still in Year 1 of legalization and I think there is a new audience that is open-minded to the space, so we want to be inclusive, he said.

Wausau Daily Herald

RIB LAKE - Jayden Dobbs hasn't been on a football field in a competitive game in almost two years.,Jayden, a 2012 graduate of Athens High School, was signed by the Salina Liberty of the Champions Indoor Football league earlier this month.,"I just didn't want to end a great time in my football career like that," Jayden said.,His dad knew, though, that Jayden wouldn't end his time in football like that.,(Photo: T'xer Zhon Kha/USA TODAY is a 'labor of love' for longtime high school coaches RELATED: Badgers star Sam Arneson passes on NFL "I don't want to look back with any regrets" Now, Jayden gets done substitute teaching at Rib Lake Elementary School and drives to Medford to work out at the local high school. read more

The discussion of alienated and apathetic young people has continually fuelled the debate on the relationship between said young people and the business landscape around them.,Somewhat ironically, it is those businesses with a negative outlook of young people that struggle to both appeal to a younger audience and, actually retain said employees once they’ve walked through the door.,Therefore, the issue is not the relationship between young people and the business world around them; rather the relationship businesses have with the young people within.,Below, I note three vital themes to consider when questioning the relationship your business has with its staff, particularly in helping to recruit and ultimately retain young people while ensuring they actively want to take their career further with your business.,Therefore, having a clearly defined and invigorated training and promotion scheme can be a valuable asset to employers of young people.

Over the last few years fans of baseball literature have been given various perspectives of the shift in baseball analytics, from Brian Kenny’s book, Ahead of the Curve, to Keith Law’s, Smart Baseball.,Carleton, a veteran baseball writer whose work has appeared in Baseball Prospectus for over eight years, penned a new book called The Shift: The Next Evolution in Baseball Thinking.,Carleton offers insightful analysis into making better baseball decisions, but with the human element nature attached.,This is a book where I think if you dig deeper into the numbers you’ll find that baseball has a lot of places where very, very human things happen.,The thing about expected value is that it describes a lot of the decisions people have to make in baseball.

Associations in different sports across the country are bleeding participation numbers, like B.C. Soccer, which said its enrolment fell seven per cent from last year., “(Parents) are aspiring for their kids to reach that really, really high plateau, when what they should be doing is just loving watching them play, and encouraging them to try as many sports as they can,” said Delta’s Glen Mulcahy, who started Paradigm Sports, a resource for coaches and parents, about five years ago., Playing multiple sports provides a physical literacy, a base of fundamental movement that crosses sports and prevents overuse injuries when the body is still too young to handle those repetitive motions., One local physiotherapist at a large athlete development centre has a 14-year-old in elite sports, who trains nearly the entire year round, obsessing over the data and information that comes with wearable technology., The summer after the Team B.C. player spent a month in an air cast, and a summer before she was to attend the Point Grey campus, Lalonde blew out the same knee — her ACL, MCL and meniscus, for the second time — and spent her first two weeks at UBC rolling around campus in a wheelchair.