Starting Monday, the Los Feliz native will host Daily Wager, a daily program on ESPNews airing at 3 p.m. and available for streaming on the ESPN app.Its the first regularly scheduled program from the Walt Disney Co.s sports media behemoth solely dedicated to gaming-related information and data on upcoming contests, and it likely wont be the last as legal sports betting spreads throughout the country.The Supreme Court ruling in May that legalized sports betting is expected to be a boost for sports talk shows, which are the low-cost moneymakers for outlets that need programming to supplement their live play-by-play telecasts.,Open discussion of odds, point spreads and other analytical data related to wagering on pro and college games each night could potentially energize the format for an audience that has a financial stake in the outcomes.The changes in the law open up an entirely new genre of entertainment, said Patrick Rishe, director of the sports business program at Washington University in St. Louis.Other sports networks are already on the bandwagon.,WarnerMedias digital sports website Bleacher Report announced last month that it is building a studio inside Caesars Palace in Las Vegas where it will produce gaming-related content.But as the countrys leading source of sports programming, ESPN, with its entry into gaming-themed shows, is marking the strongest indication yet of an attitudinal shift toward a once-verboten subject on which sports TV coverage has traditionally tread lightly.A daily ESPN show is an important milestone, said Lee Berke, president of the consulting firm LHB Sports, Entertainment Media.,ESPNs SportsCenter with Scott Van Pelt has a popular segment called Bad Beats, which humorously focuses on heartbreaking, last-minute plays that result in teams failing to cover the spread.Van Pelt sidekick Steve Coughlin will be one of the contributors to Daily Wager along with ESPN radio host Chris The Bear Fallica, ESPN.com gambling industry reporter David Purdum, Las Vegas-based handicapper Preston Johnson, fantasy football analyst Anita Marks and sports betting expert Joe Fortenbaugh.Rishe believes programs that provide usable data for bettors have the potential to draw younger viewers who have drifted away from traditional TV for sports news.,After graduating with a degree in economics from Brown University, he immersed himself in the analytics and data related to gaming and became an expert as a sports journalist in Las Vegas, where the home team is betting, he said.While wager-related data crunched by ESPNs statistic and information group will line the screen during Daily Wager, Kezirian said the programs content will still be accessible to the non-betting fan.Were still in Year 1 of legalization and I think there is a new audience that is open-minded to the space, so we want to be inclusive, he said.

But Rudnick is among a growing number of consumers who are turning to over-the-air digital antennas a one-time investment of as little as $20 as a way to slash their monthly video subscription costs.Research firms and electronics manufacturers say cord-cutting consumers such as Rudnick have driven up TV antenna sales and usage in recent years.,These value-conscious streamers, as they are known in the industry, are willing to cobble together a mosaic of video sources to replace the traditional pay TV bundle, which now costs an average of $107 a month, according to a recent study by the Leichtman Research Group.This year, 8.1 million over-the-air TV antennas will be delivered to retailers in the U.S., up 2% from last year and 8% over 2016, according to the Consumer Technology Assn.Nielsen estimates that 13.8% of U.S. homes depend on antennas to get their TV, up from 10.3% in 2014.,Research firm GfK North America puts the number of over-the-air TV homes at 16.4 million.The rapid acceleration of cord-cutting has put heavy pressure on the cable industry and media companies that own pay TV channels that depend on the steady revenue stream that subscribers provide.,The number of consumers whove canceled traditional pay TV service is expected to climb 33% to nearly 25 million this year, according to estimates from research firm eMarketer.Though worrisome for Hollywood, the trend has been a boon to antenna manufacturers like Channel Master.,Station ownership groups and the media conglomerates get a cut of pay TV subscriber fees, giving them little incentive to promote over-the-air antenna use.Consumers largely have to depend on manufacturer websites or blogs such as Cordcutters.com to learn which channels are available over the air in their area and which antenna is right for them.We do a terrible job of explaining that your local stations are available over the air for free, said Neal Sabin, vice chairman of Weigel Broadcasting, a Chicago-based TV station group.