By falling below 7.0, high school football and water polo teams in the county won’t be required to do coronavirus testing before competitions.,Ventura County’s adjusted rate last week was 9.1.,There was a collective sigh of relief from high school football and water polo coaches last week when Los Angeles County’s adjusted rate dropped below 7.0 for the first time since the California Department of Public Health established that as a guideline for youth sports.,It happened last week when Mission Viejo had a positive test in its program and had to cancel its game against La Habra.,If a county goes up and above a rate of 7.0, the testing requirement is immediately restored for football and water polo teams.

Along with the connection of engagement with the academic adjustment indicators, it stands out because of its protective role against problematic adolescent behaviors, such as criminal acts and violence, substance use and depressive symptoms.1,2 Thus, as student engagement has been shown to be enabled through school intervention, its study is of special interest, especially in secondary education.3

Academic commitment, or engagement, refers to a psychological state characterized by the student’s sense of belonging, attributing value to education, and participating in school, learning, studying and in curricular activities.4,5 Academic engagement is particularly characterized by vigor (referring to energy, willingness and persistence in making an effort to perform school activities), dedication (with regard to the sense of enthusiasm, inspiration, pride and importance attributed to it, that is, psychological identification with studies and academic activities) and absorption (related to full concentration, without effort and intrinsic enjoyment, in academic demands, so that time seems to pass quickly and it is hard to detach oneself from activities).5 read more

As the pandemic abruptly turned life upside down around the world, roughly a million public school kids in NYC were thrust into a wildly inconsistent learning environment, with repeated openings and closings of school buildings and systemwide shifts to online learning as COVID-19 rates surge.,While education officials promise to reopen schools this fall for full-time learning again, many New York City parents and students are calling for more than academic recovery, but a reckoning with the disrupted school system’s mental health toll on kids.,A Year Of Anxiety And Turmoil In the short term after Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that public school buildings were closing on March 16th, 2020 and students were shifting to remote learning, some kids said they initially celebrated a break from school.,Disparate Impacts For New York City’s public school system, whose enrollment is 41% Latino, 26% Black, 16% Asian and 15% white, the deadly toll of the pandemic has been acutely felt: “During the first five months of the pandemic, an estimated 4,200 of 4 million children in the state lost a parent or caregiver to coronavirus, a rate of more than one out of every 1,000, according to a report by the United Hospital Fund and Boston Consulting Group released at the end of September,” with more than half of those affected children residents of the Bronx, Brooklyn or Queens, according to Gotham Gazette, which reported the pandemic has disportionately taken parents away from Black and Hispanic families: 1 out of every 600 Black children, and 1 out of every 700 Hispanic children have lost a parent or caregiver, compared to 1 out of 1,400 Asian children and 1 out of 1,500 white children in New York.,The public school student population is also primarily low-income, a point which was hammered home last spring when the city Department of Education had to scramble to outfit hundreds of thousands of families with devices for remote learning.

Linda worked for a time at Marilyn’s Shoppe, a dress store in Hamilton, as well as at Shillito’s, where she helped hire people to work at the department store.,Linda was also active at their church, Park Avenue United Methodist Church in Hamilton, where she was known for cooking up entire dinners of spaghetti and meatballs and baking cookies for children’s programs, Jerry said.,While they greatly enjoyed travel, including about 20 cruises and other overseas trips, home life mattered the most, Jerry said.,Once he was released from the hospital, Jerry and their children drove to Knoxville, where Linda was on life support.,Linda’s legacy will be the close family she nurtured, Jerry said.

— High school students in Broward County have a new resource to build the skills to succeed in college and beyond, thanks to a partnership announced today between Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) and the National Educational Equity Lab (Ed Equity Lab), a nonprofit that works to bridge the gap between high school and college for students from low-income backgrounds.,The ambitious initiative, which has reached over 3,000 high school students in 34 cities over the past 18 months, will provide more than 200 students at Title I high schools across BCPS with free access to Yale University’s most popular course, “Psychology and the Good Life,” taught by pioneering cognitive psychologist Dr. Laurie Santos.,In addition to its launch in Broward County, the Ed Equity Lab will deliver and support Yale’s course to students in more than 40 Title I high schools across the country, including in Los Angeles, New York, Baton Rouge, Orlando, Meriden, Connecticut, and Gallup, New Mexico.,In addition to Yale and UConn, other top colleges and universities working with the Ed Equity Lab to provide college credit-bearing courses to talented historically underserved high school students include: Howard University, Cornell University, Arizona State University and Harvard University for the inaugural pilot.,“Our work with universities and districts around the country shows that especially for students in underserved schools, access to actual college courses with real college professors can have a transformative impact,” said Alexandra Slack, Chief of Staff at the National Education Equity Lab.

University College London, where I am an assistant professor of education in the School of Management, has spearheaded initiatives to create innovative programs with the Medical and Life Sciences Faculties across the university’s schools and colleges to train the next generation.,In order to take promising pharmaceutical research and other innovations into the market, it is important for scientists to have an understanding of business and entrepreneurial skills, language and knowledge.,Another area that requires an interdisciplinary approach is the need to train future doctors in management skills.,In 2014, the School of Management developed an innovative module on Medical Policy, Innovation and Management that brings together experts from our school and other departments, to discuss and debate these topics with medical students.,The latter is what has led us to develop a Health Care and Life Sciences portfolio at the School of Management.

— High school students in Broward County have a new resource to build the skills to succeed in college and beyond, thanks to a partnership announced today between Broward County Public Schools (BCPS) and the National Educational Equity Lab (Ed Equity Lab), a nonprofit that works to bridge the gap between high school and college for students from low-income backgrounds.,The ambitious initiative, which has reached over 3,000 high school students in 34 cities over the past 18 months, will provide more than 200 students at Title I high schools across BCPS with free access to Yale University’s most popular course, “Psychology and the Good Life,” taught by pioneering cognitive psychologist Dr. Laurie Santos.,In addition to its launch in Broward County, the Ed Equity Lab will deliver and support Yale’s course to students in more than 40 Title I high schools across the country, including in Los Angeles, New York, Baton Rouge, Orlando, Meriden, Connecticut, and Gallup, New Mexico.,In addition to Yale and UConn, other top colleges and universities working with the Ed Equity Lab to provide college credit-bearing courses to talented historically underserved high school students include: Howard University, Cornell University, Arizona State University and Harvard University for the inaugural pilot.,“Our work with universities and districts around the country shows that especially for students in underserved schools, access to actual college courses with real college professors can have a transformative impact,” said Alexandra Slack, Chief of Staff at the National Education Equity Lab.

San Clemente High football assistant coach Joe Wood, who was the head coach at Aliso Niguel when it won a CIF championship, died Friday night.,He was Aliso Niguel’s first varsity football head coach.,Wood coached Aliso Niguel from the 1993 season through the 2005 season.,His replacement after the ’05 season was Jeff Veeder, who was an Aliso assistant coach.,Kurt Westling was on the ’96 championship team coaching staff at Aliso Niguel and would later become the school’s third head coach in 2010.

It’s now Ken’s third marriage and Jan’s second, but to see them together is a lot like watching newlyweds.,That’s according to Jan’s daughter, Linda Orr, who says the couple are so in love, “they cannot keep their hands off each other, they are lovey-dovey all day.,Ken and Jan met again, at San Juan Capistrano South Coast Christian Assembly, where they were both members.,A few months into dating, Ken said, he woke up one morning and “heard a song, and it was as if the Lord was saying marry that woman.”,The couple lived in Ken’s house in Capistrano for a few years before moving to the Village and making the best of their love and their lives.

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LOS ANGELES — The rates of new coronavirus infections and hospitalizations continue to fall across California, but the state’s death toll remains persistently high.,___ read more