SANTA ANITA (CBSLA) – While live racing is suspended indefinitely at Santa Anita Park, officials reopened the training track as they continue to attempt to determine what could be responsible for the deaths of 21 horses going back to December.,Santa Anita’s training track — one of three on the grounds that include the main and turf tracks — reopened Friday.,Experts examine the main track at Santa Anita Park on March 7, 2019.,“Once it reopens, they will closely monitor that track’s condition as horses stabled at Santa Anita Park begin using it.”,Last week, Santa Anita closed the main track for several days to have Peterson do an evaluation, this following the 19th horse death.

Head coach Jahn Tihanksy will lead the Naval Academy Varsity Offshore Sailing Team in defense of its championship at the Port of Los Angeles Harbor Cup, being held March 8 through 10.,Since its inception, over 900 athletes and coaches, racing on 115 intercollegiate sailing teams and representing 23 different universities, have competed in the Harbor Cup.,CRAB President Brad LaTour welcomed Grosvenor and Mitman Clarke to their first board meeting on January 15th and introduced them by saying, “We are exceptionally pleased to have added to the CRAB Board two wonderful people with incredibly extensive boating experience on Chesapeake Bay and a vast knowledge of sailboat racing that can be shared with CRAB’s volunteers and special guests.”,SCC NEWS: Sailing Club of the Chesapeake members gathered recently for the 59th annual Change of Watch dinner dance and saw the commodore’s flag passed from Ed Paglee to John “Woody” Doxey.,Sailing Club of the Chesapeake is entering its 75th year of existence and the annual dinner dance at the Hotel Annapolis recognizes the 2018 achievements in cruising, racing and volunteer activities.

It is the first of two dates – the series will return Jan. 19 to Anaheim – and the first of five stops in the state and Arizona

It’s a season of change for the 12-round series.,NBC Sports begins its first season with the Monster Energy AMA Supercross on Saturday with live coverage of the season-opening event in Anaheim starting at 7 p.m. Ralph Sheheen will call the action, as he has done since 2005, and will be joined in the booth by five-time Supercross champion Ricky Carmichael, host and former racer Daniel Blair, and reporter Will Christien.,He and Kasey Kahne Racing teammate Brad Sweet will kick off the 2019 dirt-sprint seasons at Volusia Speedway in Florisa with the Dirt Car Nationals on Feb. 6.,Pit stops read more

It is the first of two dates – the series will return Jan. 19 to Anaheim – and the first of five stops in the state and Arizona

It’s a season of change for the 12-round series.,NBC Sports begins its first season with the Monster Energy AMA Supercross on Saturday with live coverage of the season-opening event in Anaheim starting at 7 p.m. Ralph Sheheen will call the action, as he has done since 2005, and will be joined in the booth by five-time Supercross champion Ricky Carmichael, host and former racer Daniel Blair, and reporter Will Christien.,He and Kasey Kahne Racing teammate Brad Sweet will kick off the 2019 dirt-sprint seasons at Volusia Speedway in Florisa with the Dirt Car Nationals on Feb. 6.,Pit stops read more

Police say the local racing scene has grown stronger in recent years, and many believe the most dangerous incidents stem from spontaneous races in residential neighborhoods and street takeovers that draw hundreds.The California Highway Patrol documented 984 street racing incidents in Los Angeles County last year including spontaneous races and organized events accounting for a little more than 40% of the incidents statewide.The evolving, and increasingly dangerous, nature of such outlaw events has drawn condemnation from police and politicians, but its also aggravated a segment of racers as well.For decades, Los Angeles members of the National and International Brotherhood of Street Racers had organized legal races on a strip of land on Terminal Island with the backing of some police and civic leaders.,If you cant follow the rules, if you cant follow the code, you cant be out here.Still, one of the groups leaders who asked to be identified by his nickname, Taz said he knows the risks hes taking getting behind the wheel, no matter how many precautions the group takes.We know its a dangerous sport, no matter where you put it, he said.Donald Galaz, another member of the group who is often seen at street racing advocacy events throughout Los Angeles County, said their message is simple: They want to work with local government to find a legal place to race, and they want to end the casualties.This is not a game.,Worse because weve lost the tracks and the opportunity where people can actually gather in safe places and locations, and theres more enthusiasts and aficionados that are changing their vehicles and amending them, and people with social media find it easy to gather, he said.The new owners of Irwindale Speedway, home to the only legal drag strip in Los Angeles County that is both close to the city and palatable to street racers, is trying to prove Galazs theory correct.,The track hosts weekly racing and drifting events on Thursdays, which attract hundreds of car enthusiasts.Stevens said hes also waded into the Facebook and Instagram pages that are popular among street racing crews and garages and managed to urge a number of competitors to carry out grudge races at Irwindale.Huddleston said that Irwindale offers a combination of safety and easy access that is sorely needed in and around L.A. County.,But the brotherhood represents only a sliver of the citys much broader, unbridled racing scene, some officials say.A pair of cars jump off the starting line during a drag race at the Irwindale Speedway.What they do, though illegal, they do it in a safe manner, said LAPD Capt. Al Lopez, who formerly headed traffic investigations in Central Division.Galaz says the brotherhoods membership is in the hundreds, but unaffiliated racers and members of other car clubs are welcome to take part in their events as long as they follow the rules.

According to Dr. Struck, chariot racer from Ancient Rome named Gaius Appuleius Diocles, amassed a fortune of 35,863,120 sesterces – the equivalent of $15 billion.,Apparently, Gaius Appuleius Diocles, who was the most prolific charioteer in Ancient Rome, often participated in six and seven-horse chariot races.,As Peter Struck wrote for Lapham’s Quarterly, a monumental inscription was erected in Rome by his fellow charioteers and admirers in 146, which hails him fulsomely on his retirement, at the age of “42 years, 7 months, and 23 days”, as “champion of all charioteers”.,As Professor Struck wrote, “His total take home amounted to five times the earnings of the highest paid provincial governors over a similar period – enough to provide grain for the entire city of Rome for one year, or to pay all the ordinary soldiers of the Roman Army at the height of its imperial reach for a fifth of a year”.,Read another story from us: Nadia Elena Comaneci: the first Olympic gymnast to score a perfect 10

Chariot racing was a dangerous sport and many charioteers died quite young, but this wasn’t the case with Gaius Appuleius Diocles who was apparently lucky enough, or maybe good enough to die peacefully in the small Italian town of Praeneste. read more