With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting��exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

What first arose as a server outage was identified Saturday as a malware attack, which appears to have originated from outside the United States and hobbled computer systems and delayed weekend deliveries of the Los Angeles Times and other newspapers across the country.Technology teams worked feverishly to quarantine the computer virus, but it spread through Tribune Publishings network and reinfected systems crucial to the news production and printing process.,Multiple newspapers around the country were affected because they share a production platform.The attack delayed distribution of Saturday editions of the Los Angeles Times and San Diego Union Tribune.,It also stymied distribution of the West Coast editions of the Wall Street Journal and New York Times, which are printed at the Los Angeles Times Olympic printing plant in downtown Los Angeles.By Saturday afternoon, the company suspected the cyberattack originated from outside the United States, but officials said it was too soon to say whether it was carried out by a foreign state or some other entity, said a source with knowledge of the situation.We believe the intention of the attack was to disable infrastructure, more specifically servers, as opposed to looking to steal information, said the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to comment publicly.,She declined to provide specifics on the disruptions, but the companys properties include the Chicago Tribune; Baltimore Sun; Capital Gazette in Annapolis, Md.; Hartford Courant; New York Daily News; South Florida Sun Sentinel and Orlando Sentinel.No other details about the origin of the attack were immediately available and the motive remained unclear.Tribune Publishing sold The Times and the San Diego Union-Tribune to Los Angeles biotech entrepreneur Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong in June, but the two companies continue to share various systems, including software.Its unclear how many Times subscribers were impacted by late deliveries and the paper could not provide firm numbers, but a source said that a majority received their papers Saturday morning, albeit several hours late.,Programmers worked to isolate the bug, which Tribune Publishing identified as a malware attack, but at every turn the programmers ran into additional issues trying to access a myriad of files, including advertisements that needed to be added to the pages or paid obituaries.After identifying the server outage as a virus, technology teams made progress Friday quarantining it and bringing back servers, but some of their security patches didnt hold and the virus began to reinfect the network, impacting a series of servers used for news production and manufacturing processes.By late Friday, the attack was hindering the transmission of pages from offices across Southern California to printing presses as publication deadlines approached.At one point, Times staffers were making contingency plans to hand-deliver pages from the editorial offices in El Segundo to its Olympic printing plant in downtown Los Angeles.