In their first season in Indianapolis, head coach Frank Reich, left, and offensive coordinator and Jamestown native Nick Sirianni have guided the Colts into the playoffs.,Father Fran, a member of the Chautauqua Sports Hall of Fame, coached Southwestern High School from the mid-1970s to the early 1980s; brother Mike is the head coach at Washington & Jefferson College where he has compiled one of the best winning percentages in the NCAA; and brother Jay coached Southwestern to a pair of New York State Public High School Athletic Association championships in 2008 and 2009.,Once the youngest Sirianni arrived at the University of Mount Union, he played for Larry Kehres, who guided the Purple Raiders to 11 national championships in his career.,Upon his graduation, Sirianni began his climb up the coaching ranks with stops at Mount Union, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, the Kansas Chiefs and the San Diego/Los Angeles Chargers, before joining Reich’s staff in Indianapolis last February.,“One of the reasons I’m in the position I’m in now is because of the successful coaches I’ve been around, starting with growing up in a coach’s house, learning how to coach with my brothers, and then, obviously, playing for the most successful coach in NCAA football history in Larry Kehres,” he told The Post-Journal last October.

Nearly 50 dioceses and religious orders have publicly identified child-molesting priests in the wake of the Pennsylvania report issued in mid-August, and 55 more have announced plans to do the same over the next few months, the AP found.,The Pennsylvania investigation, led by state Attorney General Josh Shapiro, identified nearly 300 “predator priests” dating back seven decades and accused church leaders of covering up for the abuses, in some cases by returning priests to duty after short stays in treatment centers or reassigning them.,In the 16 years between the Boston scandal and the Pennsylvania investigation, only about 30 dioceses around the country had released lists of priests they deemed credibly accused of abuse.,In October, the pope accepted the resignation of Cardinal Donald Wuerl, archbishop of Washington, D.C., after he was accused in the report of mishandling some allegations of abuse against priests and others while bishop of Pittsburgh from 1988 to 2006.,In mid-December, she issued a blistering preliminary report saying a review of church files showed dioceses in Illinois had withheld the names of at least 500 clergy accused of sexually abusing children.

PHILADELPHIA — Over the past four months, Roman Catholic dioceses across the U.S. have released the names of more than 1,000 priests and others accused of sexually abusing children in an unprecedented public reckoning spurred at least in part by a shocking grand jury investigation in Pennsylvania, an Associated Press review has found.,Nearly 50 dioceses and religious orders have publicly identified child-molesting priests in the wake of the Pennsylvania report issued in mid-August, and 55 more have announced plans to do the same over the next few months, the AP found.,In mid-December, she issued a blistering preliminary report saying a review of church files showed dioceses in Illinois had withheld the names of at least 500 clergy accused of sexually abusing children.,The Pennsylvania investigation , led by Shapiro, identified nearly 300 “predator priests” dating back seven decades and accused church leaders of covering up for the abuses, in some cases by returning priests to duty after short stays in treatment centers or reassigning them.,In the 16 years between the Boston scandal and the Pennsylvania investigation, only about 30 dioceses around the country had released lists of priests they deemed credibly accused of abuse.

On June 13, an emergency text alert advising Wyoming Valley residents to “take shelter now” was sent to area cell phones at 9:55 p.m.

Barely five minutes later, 130 mph winds tore a path of destruction across the Arena Hub Plaza and surrounding commercial areas in Wilkes-Barre Township.,It was like raining in the building,” said Joe Stager, manager at at Barnes & Noble in the Arena Hub Plaza who was closing up for the night with employees Mary Zoltewicz, Patrick Abdalla, Rachel Trojan and Tara Steffon as the storm plowed into the store.,Embattled Wilkes-Barre Police Chief Marcella Lendacky retired in June following the March release of a report by the Pennsylvania Chiefs of Police Association that depicted a department in turmoil, with morale at a low point.,More than 10,000 turned out for the Trump rally, which dwarfed a last-minute Nov. 4 “Pennsylvania Votes Blue” Democratic rally that drew Casey, former Vice-president Joe Biden and other candidates to a cramped corridor at Pittston Area High School on a Sunday night.,On the other hand, Reading-based Boscov’s whose Wilkes-Barre store remains a fixture on the downtown business scene, had a very good year. read more

Sixty years ago this week, Maury Povich sat shivering in a mezzanine box down the third base line at the old Yankee Stadium, as the Baltimore Colts and New York Giants played deep into the winter twilight.,For Povich, all these years later that game remains window into a previous life, one where he imagined himself as a sports broadcaster.,Povich's father, Shirley, was a sports columnist at The Washington Post, who covered the 1958 championship game, too.,Povich worked as a news anchor around the country — in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago and back in Washington — before Rupert Murdoch called him up to New York in 1986 to offer him a job at a tabloid news show, "A Current Affair.",Povich has been in New York for more than 30 years now, but he remains a die-hard Washington sports fan.

According to Dr. Struck, chariot racer from Ancient Rome named Gaius Appuleius Diocles, amassed a fortune of 35,863,120 sesterces – the equivalent of $15 billion.,Apparently, Gaius Appuleius Diocles, who was the most prolific charioteer in Ancient Rome, often participated in six and seven-horse chariot races.,As Peter Struck wrote for Lapham’s Quarterly, a monumental inscription was erected in Rome by his fellow charioteers and admirers in 146, which hails him fulsomely on his retirement, at the age of “42 years, 7 months, and 23 days”, as “champion of all charioteers”.,As Professor Struck wrote, “His total take home amounted to five times the earnings of the highest paid provincial governors over a similar period – enough to provide grain for the entire city of Rome for one year, or to pay all the ordinary soldiers of the Roman Army at the height of its imperial reach for a fifth of a year”.,Read another story from us: Nadia Elena Comaneci: the first Olympic gymnast to score a perfect 10

Chariot racing was a dangerous sport and many charioteers died quite young, but this wasn’t the case with Gaius Appuleius Diocles who was apparently lucky enough, or maybe good enough to die peacefully in the small Italian town of Praeneste. read more

For many teenagers, says Dahl, there is risk in relatively benign experiences, such as standing up for a friend or asking someone on a date., Neuroscientists have used this game to test how a teenager’s propensity to take risks can depend on their social stature., Interestingly, the same brain systems that mediate unhealthy risk-taking also seem to help teenagers to take positive risks., Telzer’s studies suggest that teenagers who show heightened ventral striatum activity when making decisions that help others, such as donating money, take fewer risks in the long term and have a lower risk of depression as adults., Her team asked them to lie in a scanner and push a button when they saw letters on a screen, but not if the screen displayed an X. Images with social significance—positive pictures such as teenagers laughing or playing games on a beach, and negative ones including a group ganging up on someone—also appeared on screen.

But Dr. Steve Galetta of New York University’s Langone Medical Center, who understands the vagaries of concussions and brain trauma as well as anyone, has his doubts that the sport can eliminate the worry every parent feels when their kid decides to play football, hockey or another collision sport., Galetta, a leading neuro-ophthalmologist, and colleague Dr. Laura Balcer, vice-chair of neurology and co-director of Langone’s concussion centre, are among medical professionals drawn to the new scourge of sports concussions and chronic brain disease from other areas of neurology., Since vision impairment is one of the pronounced symptoms of concussion — “50 per cent of the brain’s pathways are dedicated to vision” — Galetta and Balcer expanded their focus into that area., A member of the NCAA concussion task force and the Ivy League concussion committee, Balcer remains “fascinated by the game of football. ”, “The real problem is at the youth level, where two-thirds of sports concussions occur, and there’s no way you can have athletic trainers there,” Galetta said.