Roy Dunn, founder of the Opportunity Valley News, looks through one of the first editions of the free weekly newspaper that was distributed to every home in Orange County beginning on St. Patrick's Day, March 17, 1971.,After nine years, Cox Newspapers, owner of the Orange Leader and Port Arthur News, bought the paper from Dunn and it was published by the Orange Leader for the next 20 years.,It's been 50 years to the day – St. Patrick's Day, 1971 -- since Roy Dunn went into the newspapering business with the first edition of the Opportunity Valley News.,Roy Dunn says Runnels' weekly sports column entitled "'Strike Two, Third Down' made his name very famous around Orange County.","With all the success the Opportunity Valley News had, the Community Post was just amazing, the way it took off," Roy Dunn said.

The OC Health Care Agency reported 658 new cases of the coronavirus on Tuesday, Feb. 16, increasing the cumulative total in the county to 243,163  cases since tracking began.,The data on deaths in the county is compiled from death certificates or gathered through the course of case investigations and can take weeks to process.,An estimated 8,455 cases of the virus have been recorded in Orange County in the last 14 days.,The county’s breakdown of deaths by age is as follows:

85 and older: 32.96% (1,193, up 14) read more

A new vaccination site at Santa Ana College opening Wednesday, Feb. 17, aims to serve eligible residents in Anaheim, Garden Grove and Santa Ana neighborhoods that have seen some of the highest COVID-19 infection rates in the county and the largest numbers of people hospitalized or killed by the virus.,Like the county’s other PODS (points of dispensing), vaccinations at the Santa Ana College site will be by appointment only.,“The Santa Ana College site is a tangible example of the county and Board of Supervisors delivering on our focus on equity in vaccine distribution.”,The county is alerting people 65 and older who live in the affected ZIP codes and are registered with Othena that they can make an appointment for the Santa Ana College site, and it’s doing other outreach to eligible seniors who haven’t yet signed up through Othena, Kim said.,“I’m obviously excited that there is going to be a vaccination site here in in Santa Ana, and I’m even more glad that it is going to be addressing some of the most impacted residents in our community and our county,” he  said.

Some 533,000 doses of Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccines, which both require a second dose a few weeks after the first, had been administered in Orange County by Sunday, Feb. 14, according to the state Department of Public Health.,At least 306,000 people who live or work in Orange County had received at least one dose by Monday, Feb. 8, according to the OC Health Care Agency’s latest available data.,A month ago, eligibility in the county was expanded from frontline health care workers and those in long-term care facilities to seniors 65 and older as well.,With vaccination super sites in Anaheim and Aliso Viejo and roaming pop-up mobile clinics, the county Health Care Agency has borne the brunt of bristling demand for COVID-19 immunization as traditional health care providers rev up their own drives.,On Friday, state health officials announced that starting March 15, vaccine administrators could start inoculating people ages 16 to 64 with medical conditions that put them at increased risk of having a deadly case of COVID-19.

But Orange County, at least, has lower tax rates that any large metropolitan area in the state.,Taxes at least stayed low in Orange County, as Moorlach again insisted: No new taxes.,Sure enough, Orange County led California out of the recovery that began in 2010, its unemployment rate well below the state rate.,In his current run for supervisor, Moorlach again has pledged to stop all new county taxes.,Moorlach’s experience in complex matters of government finance would be especially valuable to help Orange County navigate the difficult path through the pandemic without incurring reckless debt or saddling families and businesses with damaging tax increases.

A slash and burn campaign against the most qualified candidate, John Moorlach, is underway to interfere in the special election for Orange County Supervisor District 2.,A former Orange County supervisor and state senator, Moorlach has been a fiscal watchdog, fighting public sector unions’ abuse of the pension system and working to keep our economy strong.,For decades, Moorlach has been a fierce champion of Orange County residents and has accomplished something rare in politics today: He has repeatedly addressed problems on the horizon before they become cataclysmic policy failures that hurt Orange County.,Time and again, Moorlach has led on critical issues and has proactively worked to protect Orange County families.,Moorlach’s remarkable persistence to do the right thing is in stark contrast to Costa Mesa Mayor Katrina Foley.

The executive committee for the Central Coast Section, the governing body for high school athletics in five northern California counties — San Mateo, Santa Clara, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Cruz — and a few private schools in San Francisco, approved plans this week for sports teams to return to practice amid the coronavirus pandemic.,A handful of sports are scheduled to return to competition Jan. 25, though no competition can be held until local stay-at-home orders are lifted, and the section left it up to leagues to move the seasons of all sports as they see fit.,The only downside for leagues moving low-contact sports — those allowed to play in the state’s purple tier — into the section’s Season 1 (Jan. 25 start date) is missing out on the possibility of playoffs.,The North Coast Section, which announced its plans Thursday to rearrange its whole schedule to allow low-contact sports first, eliminated playoff plans for both seasons.,But the East Bay’s Diablo Athletic League already announced Friday afternoon that it was rearranging its schedule to move purple-tier sports up in its calendar to allow for more competition.

The executive committee for the Central Coast Section, the governing body for high school athletics in five northern California counties — San Mateo, Santa Clara, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Cruz — and a few private schools in San Francisco, approved plans this week for sports teams to return to practice amid the coronavirus pandemic.,A handful of sports are scheduled to return to competition Jan. 25, though no competition can be held until local stay-at-home orders are lifted, and the section left it up to leagues to move the seasons of all sports as they see fit.,The only downside for leagues moving low-contact sports — those allowed to play in the state’s purple tier — into the section’s Season 1 (Jan. 25 start date) is missing out on the possibility of playoffs.,The North Coast Section, which announced its plans Thursday to rearrange its whole schedule to allow low-contact sports first, eliminated playoff plans for both seasons.,But the East Bay’s Diablo Athletic League already announced Friday afternoon that it was rearranging its schedule to move purple-tier sports up in its calendar to allow for more competition.