Starting Monday, the Los Feliz native will host Daily Wager, a daily program on ESPNews airing at 3 p.m. and available for streaming on the ESPN app.Its the first regularly scheduled program from the Walt Disney Co.s sports media behemoth solely dedicated to gaming-related information and data on upcoming contests, and it likely wont be the last as legal sports betting spreads throughout the country.The Supreme Court ruling in May that legalized sports betting is expected to be a boost for sports talk shows, which are the low-cost moneymakers for outlets that need programming to supplement their live play-by-play telecasts.,Open discussion of odds, point spreads and other analytical data related to wagering on pro and college games each night could potentially energize the format for an audience that has a financial stake in the outcomes.The changes in the law open up an entirely new genre of entertainment, said Patrick Rishe, director of the sports business program at Washington University in St. Louis.Other sports networks are already on the bandwagon.,WarnerMedias digital sports website Bleacher Report announced last month that it is building a studio inside Caesars Palace in Las Vegas where it will produce gaming-related content.But as the countrys leading source of sports programming, ESPN, with its entry into gaming-themed shows, is marking the strongest indication yet of an attitudinal shift toward a once-verboten subject on which sports TV coverage has traditionally tread lightly.A daily ESPN show is an important milestone, said Lee Berke, president of the consulting firm LHB Sports, Entertainment Media.,ESPNs SportsCenter with Scott Van Pelt has a popular segment called Bad Beats, which humorously focuses on heartbreaking, last-minute plays that result in teams failing to cover the spread.Van Pelt sidekick Steve Coughlin will be one of the contributors to Daily Wager along with ESPN radio host Chris The Bear Fallica, ESPN.com gambling industry reporter David Purdum, Las Vegas-based handicapper Preston Johnson, fantasy football analyst Anita Marks and sports betting expert Joe Fortenbaugh.Rishe believes programs that provide usable data for bettors have the potential to draw younger viewers who have drifted away from traditional TV for sports news.,After graduating with a degree in economics from Brown University, he immersed himself in the analytics and data related to gaming and became an expert as a sports journalist in Las Vegas, where the home team is betting, he said.While wager-related data crunched by ESPNs statistic and information group will line the screen during Daily Wager, Kezirian said the programs content will still be accessible to the non-betting fan.Were still in Year 1 of legalization and I think there is a new audience that is open-minded to the space, so we want to be inclusive, he said.

History is replete with athletes who voiced opinions about wars and peace, endorsed candidates or run for office themselves, but President Donald Trump's election and his vociferous criticism of the Colin Kaepernick-led national anthem protests have intensified political discourse among some professional players and sparked a new level of activism on and off the fields and courts., "It's not even something that I talk about that much with my teammates -- the guys that I'm around every day," said Washington Nationals closer Sean Doolittle at the All-Star Game's media session Monday., Tony Clark, the executive director of the MLB Players Association and a former All-Star first basemen himself, explained that the locker room could, at times, be a place where players held debates and hashed out broader issues, given the trust that players built among themselves in such close quarters., Last September, Oakland Athletics catcher Bruce Maxwell became the first, and thus far only, MLB player to kneel during a pre-game performance of the national anthem., A popular theory raised as to why the MLB has lagged behind other leagues in public displays of activism has been the racial makeup of its players.

A website has been established called “The Prevention Project,” which sports the tagline “Everyone deserves support,” and attempts to push two disgusting ideas—that there are different classes of “pedophiles” for different ages of children that should be accepted by society, and that “non-offending pedophiles” should be praised for the fact that they have yet to molest a child., The Prevention Project defines a “pedophile” as an adult who is attracted to pre-pubescent children, and claims that there are different classes of “pedophiles,” based on the age of the child, which include infantophiles (pedophiles who are attracted only to infants), hebephiles (pedophiles who are attracted to pubescent children), and ephebophiles (pedophiles who are attracted to post-pubescent children)., The website then went on to argue that in the case of the fictional character “John,” his sexual attraction to children, aged 6-12, was justified because he had yet to harm a child or to act on his sickening desires, and anyone who believed John was in the wrong was simply influenced by “religious beliefs.”, Launching into a conversation on NOMAPs or “Non-Offending Minor-Attracted Persons,” the Prevention Project argued that individuals should feel safe sharing their sexual attraction to children without being worried about the recourse from individuals in society because “research also indicates that someone can be attracted to a child without inevitably sexually abusing them.”, He claimed that many pedophiles realize their sexual desires when they are children and that “the process of discovery is pretty much the same as with any other sexual orientation — including heterosexuality.”

You may have a read about a recently published paper reporting the presence of CTE in the brains of 99 percent of former National Football League players examined., People are coming away from the constant media barrage with the belief that concussions are the sole and direct cause of CTE, most or all football players have CTE, and CTE has led football players to become violent, commit suicide or develop dementia., The study was based on 202 brains out of the millions of people who’ve played football – 111 of which are former NFL players., So, when you hear “99 percent of football players had CTE,” that doesn’t mean that almost every football player will get CTE, and it doesn’t mean your child has a 99-percent chance of developing CTE if he or she plays football., Because of this sampling bias, we cannot estimate the prevalence or incidence of CTE (meaning the total number of cases and the number of new cases expected each year in football players); nor can we establish risk or a cause-effect relationship between head injury and development of CTE.