With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting��exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

But we also asked our readers—many of whom are deeply engaged and educated on the nuances of food and farming—to share their year-end reflections on what stood out for them in food and ag policy this year.,As we’ve reported before, food waste is also a cause of climate change, and many readers noted that climate change is “the big one.”,Many readers said the 2018 Farm Bill was the biggest story of the year, both because of “the unprecedented political division around it” as well as because “it influences everything impacting agricultural policy in the U.S.” It’s also an example of “the large corporate political pressure that only serves the largest corporate interests at the expense of family farms, taxpayers, and the 99 percent who also have to eat,” wrote L.A. Shapiro from Washington, D.C..,The last-minute passage of the farm bill earlier this month—which followed extensive controversy and political wrangling throughout the year—offered a mixed bag of wins and losses in readers’ eyes.,And finally, Emily Landenberger in Vermont sees promise in the ways industrial hemp, which was fully legalized by the 2018 Farm Bill, might help Vermont farmers.

The concept of well-being has many facets, yet themes weave through all stages of development and point to critical aspects of how and with whom we spend time.,While research and understanding of social media is still in its infancy, a recent study on Facebook users offers: “Our results showed that although real-world social networks were positively associated with overall well-being, the use of Facebook was negatively associated with overall well-being.”,Holding a door, saying “Please” and “Thank you, ”offering a smile, reaching out to someone in need are some of the many simple ways we can feed the souls of others and our self in daily life.,The bottom line is clear whether we are employers, employees, teachers or students: the quality of relationships and attention matters to our overall well-being.,Simple acknowledgement of the blessings in our life and of the day has a profound influence on well-being and builds momentum over time.

Since the passage of Title IX in 1972, the number of women participating in sports has skyrocketed, increasing 560 percent at the college level, yet women continue to be underrepresented in exercise science research—both as participants in general studies and as the specific subject of scientific inquiry—creating huge gaps in knowledge about female physiology and performance.,With more men participating in sports in general compared to women, there were simply more males to choose from in the potential pool of research subjects.,When women and men play the same sports by the same rules and use the same equipment (say, in soccer), women have a 50 percent higher concussion rate, according to a 2015 study in JAMA Pediatrics.,A 2017 study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found that, of 207 male and female athletes evaluated for concussion, women presented a greater number and severity of symptoms.,Snedaker says variations between male and female brain injury patterns emerge around puberty—premenstrual girls have similar outcomes to men—and a woman���s monthly cycle may also affect recovery and end results.

Student-athletes strongly believe that progress is a process They develop this faith because they often act at the edge of their limits, and justify their depleting efforts by visualising how it will help them perform.,An individual only has so much energy in a day, and with the expectation to improve both physically and intellectually, they put pressure on how effectively they spend their time and energy.,Over time players find their roles in the team, they learn to respect the history of the program, they seek advice from their elders, and a strong camaraderie is built.,Focused on performance, and limited in energy, student-athletes rely on preparation to get through the day, and understand the repercussions of their lapses in judgement.,Prepared or not, student-athletes are required to switch tasks and step into a new environment that demands a different mentality.