“Every shoe in our collection, in a way great or small, reflects the spirit of Mr. Onitsuka,” Fukui says, referring to the late Kihachiro Onitsuka, the company founder and a father of the modern global running movement.,After pausing a moment to let their importance register, Fukui adds: “These are the shoes that Viren asked Mr. Onitsuka to work on the night before the race.,The first global running boom had taken wing, and Onitsuka Tiger shoes dominated among elite athletes and citizen-runners.,Mr. Onitsuka’s octopus moment, however, preceded that by decades.After an exhaustive one-man sales campaign—the young entrepreneur slept on train station benches because he couldn’t afford lodging, inquired at police stations for the location of sporting-goods stores, and spent countless hours courting coaches at far-flung gyms—the Onitsuka basketball shoes proved a hit.,A few years later, Mr. Onitsuka turned his attention to designing a shoe for the marathon, at the time a fringe enterprise in the rest of the world, but well respected in Japan, with its traditional emphasis on discipline and endurance.A nonrunner himself, Mr. Onitsuka approached the challenge with a beginner’s mind.

In their first season in Indianapolis, head coach Frank Reich, left, and offensive coordinator and Jamestown native Nick Sirianni have guided the Colts into the playoffs.,Father Fran, a member of the Chautauqua Sports Hall of Fame, coached Southwestern High School from the mid-1970s to the early 1980s; brother Mike is the head coach at Washington & Jefferson College where he has compiled one of the best winning percentages in the NCAA; and brother Jay coached Southwestern to a pair of New York State Public High School Athletic Association championships in 2008 and 2009.,Once the youngest Sirianni arrived at the University of Mount Union, he played for Larry Kehres, who guided the Purple Raiders to 11 national championships in his career.,Upon his graduation, Sirianni began his climb up the coaching ranks with stops at Mount Union, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, the Kansas Chiefs and the San Diego/Los Angeles Chargers, before joining Reich’s staff in Indianapolis last February.,“One of the reasons I’m in the position I’m in now is because of the successful coaches I’ve been around, starting with growing up in a coach’s house, learning how to coach with my brothers, and then, obviously, playing for the most successful coach in NCAA football history in Larry Kehres,” he told The Post-Journal last October.