In addition:

William Rick Singer, 58, of Newport Beach, Calif., owner of the Edge College Career Network and CEO of the Key Worldwide Foundation, was charged in an information with racketeering conspiracy and money laundering.,John Vandemoer, 41, of Stanford, Calif., the former sailing coach at Stanford University, was charged in an information with racketeering conspiracy.,Charged with racketeering conspiracy: read more

We believe that everyone should have access to important local news, for free.,However, it costs money to keep a local news organization like this one—independently owned and operated here in Long Beach, without the backing of any national corporation—alive.,If independent local news is important to you, please consider supporting us with a monthly or one-time contribution.

The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power will be shuttering its three gas-fired coastal power plants over the next decade, a key step in the city’s aspiration to become the nation’s first metropolis to run entirely on renewable energy.,Its plants in Long Beach, Wilmington and Playa del Rey had been slated for new, more efficient units run on natural gas.,But Mayor Eric Garcetti made a formal announcement Tuesday that $5 billion in costs associated with new gas-fired units would be used instead to accelerate the transition to renewable energy, part of a three-pronged plan that also calls for emission-free vehicles and buildings in the city.,The DWP plants in Long Beach, Wilmington and Playa del Rey had also been scheduled for replacement units, but that plan was put on hold in 2017 so the department could study clean-energy alternatives and assess how quickly the city could reduce natural-gas use.,In 2017, DWP was getting 31 percent of its energy from natural gas — and 18 percent from a coal-burning plant in Utah.

Now, DFM has its eye on a potential takeover of the newspapers owned by Gannett, which would be tragic for cities and communities served by a Gannett-owned newspaper.,And, in 2016, DFM purchased the Orange County Register and Riverside Press-Enterprise and formed the Southern California News Group.,Today, the 11 SCNG papers, including the L.A. Daily News, the Orange County Register and the San Bernardino Sun, share content in order to save a lot of money and significantly boost DFM’s profits, little if any of which was reinvested in its news properties.,The purchase of your home town’s (or home state’s, for that matter) newspaper by DFM does real damage to residents’ awareness of what is actually going on in the community and it renders once-robust newspapers into little more than newsletters reposting press releases.,Besides crippling Southern California news coverage by ravaging the staffs of nearly a dozen newspapers, DFM has similarly decimated news staffs in Northern California, where the once-booming San Jose Mercury News and a number of community papers have been savaged by cuts and layoffs.

He is the second black man to die in Bucks Laurel Avenue residence a fact that has stoked outrage and suspicion among activists and community members.Tim Dean, left, and Mark Chambers in Paris during the summer of 2018.,He was in between, like everyone else, said Mark Chambers, who said he met Dean in 1991 through Lambda Basketball League, a gay mens basketball group.Chambers, 54, said he knew Dean as a caring and outgoing friend who preferred to call on holidays and birthdays, not text, and showed up in person when someone was in need.Tim was not reserved.,The pair also played in the same basketball league in L.A. and traveled to Paris for the Gay Games this summer.You mention his name, and even if you didnt spend time with him, you knew who he was and knew him from his smile.For the last three years, Dean had allowed Ottavio Taddei to live in his spare bedroom while Taddei, a native of Italy, worked as an actor and dancer.Taddei said that as roommates they couldnt have been more different separated in age by 20 years and having a different sexual orientation but Dean was welcoming.,Not someone who had a problem.A close friend of Deans had been coping with addiction, and Dean had gone to great lengths to help his friend by giving him food and mediating conversation with the friends family, Taddei said.Chambers said Dean had long ago grown out of any casual drug use.He talked about the years when he was running wild, Chambers said.,Just because he did porn doesnt equal a drug addict.The fact of the matter: Two black males died in the same apartment and the same man is the last person to see them alive, Sanders said.Thats something deeper to look into than what someone did to make money.In recent years, Dean seemed to have abandoned the adult film roles.In 2015, he graduated with his associates degree from Santa Monica Community College, a moment he said was 52 years in the making.I guess something called life and maybe having a little too much fun kept distracting me, he wrote around the time of his graduation.This degree will not change the world but it will be the first degree earned by anyone in my family.He also began attending One LA, a church on La Brea Boulevard, and Taddei said Dean was open about seeking spiritual guidance.That spiritual commitment led him to the rooftop last year, where he wore a black T-shirt that said Truth and stepped into the pool for his baptism.Afterward, he wrote online about the symbolism of the moment: Im surviving thriving in my life right now.Times staff writers Hailey Branson-Potts and Richard Winton contributed to this report.

When: Jan. 26-27, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Where: Aquarium of the Pacific, 100 Aquarium Way, Long Beach read more

LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — Local transit agencies are offering free bus and train rides this New Year’s Eve so revelers can avoid driving drunk or paying “surge” pricing for ride-share services.,All Metro bus and rail lines will be free beginning at 9 p.m. and continuing until 2 a.m. Tuesday.,The fare gates at Metro rail stations will all be unlocked, including ones leading to festivities at Grand Park in Downtown Los Angeles.,Metro rail lines will operate every 10-12 minutes from 9 p.m. until 1 a.m. Tuesday.,Long Beach Transit also plans to offer free bus rides, beginning at 5 p.m. Its service will also be extended, with routes leaving the Transit Gallery on First Street between Long Beach Boulevard and Pine Avenue as late as 2:35 a.m. Tuesday, according to spokesman Michael Gold.

(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily Ryan Neapole, is the SCNG SoCal Varsity boys water polo player of the year.,(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

Sound The gallery will resume Ryan Neapole, is the SCNG SoCal Varsity boys water polo player of the year.,(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily Ryan Neapole, is the SCNG SoCal Varsity boys water polo player of the year.,(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily Ryan Neapole, is the SCNG SoCal Varsity boys water polo player of the year.,(Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily Ryan Neapole, is the SCNG SoCal Varsity boys water polo player of the year. read more

Bill Spiller, a short, slight and stylish African American golfer, came to the Bay Area in 1948 to compete in the Richmond Open, a PGA tournament.,Spiller faded, but still finished 34th, which automatically qualified him for the following week’s Richmond Open, a PGA event.,On behalf of Spiller, Rhodes and a local black golfer named Madison Gunther, attorney John Rowell sued the PGA for $315,000 for denying the men the opportunity to obtain employment in their chosen profession.,At a tournament in San Diego in 1953, yanked from the field, Spiller challenged a high-ranking PGA official to a fistfight, then held up the tourney by blocking the first tee, either by lying down or standing in front of it.,Spiller told author Al Barkow, who wrote “Gettin’ To The Dance Floor,” an oral history of golf’s integration, that one year at the L.A. Open, he asked the starter on the first tee why all three black players in the field were in the same group.

Nearly two years later, Corey Kiefer and Jacob Zamora, both 24, pleaded no contest to felony vehicular manslaughter and were sentenced to six years in prison, the maximum term.Jacob Zamora, right, and Corey Kiefer appear in Norwalk court, where they pleaded guilty to vehicular manslaughter for their involvement in a December 2016 street race that left Natalie Volkoff dead.Since 2009, authorities in Los Angeles County have made arrests in more than half the cases where street racing was suspected in a fatal car crash.,"Our court system isn't going to care until more people start to die," said an LAPD police investigator who requested anonymity in order to speak candidly about the issue.In Los Angeles County, where authorities say that street racing is on the rise, at least 179 people died in suspected incidents from 2000 to 2017, according to the Times analysis.Late last year, street racing was suspected in a crash in Northridge that killed four people when a 20-year-old lost control of a BMW and crashed into a tree.,The death toll has extended to 2018, including an incident in which a man was killed and a woman seriously injured when their sport utility vehicle was struck by a car involved in a street race near downtown in July, police said.Some families that have lost relatives feel robbed that criminal cases started out with a murder charge and ended with what they see as a slap on the wrist.A 2010 collision between two vehicles racing through Long Beach left four people dead, including 32-year-old Candace Ann Bustamante.The driver of the vehicle that smashed into Bustamante, Denis Alberto Reyes, was sentenced to 17 years and eight months in state prison after pleading no contest to four counts of gross vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated.,The California Highway Patrol meanwhile, documented 984 street racing incidents in Los Angeles County in 2017, records show.Los Angeles is the hub of street racing activity in the county, and several investigators said they believed the cases submitted by the LAPD represent just a fraction of the illegal activity taking place on city streets.Much of that driven by popular culture and social media is in the form of organized takeover events, where people use their cars to block off streets or intersections to stage races or stunts that can attract hundreds of onlookers.Three people, including a 15-year-old, were killed in Commerce in 2015 after a car doing doughnuts in the street collided with another vehicle, striking spectators.The low number of racing cases filed by the LAPD is a point of frustration for some investigators tasked with tackling the city's burgeoning street takeover scene.Arresting and prosecuting participants is hampered by the chaotic nature of the events, according to Capt. Andy Neiman, who oversees traffic operations at the LAPD's Valley Bureau.Its very challenging, tactically, to try to control a crowd that is engaged in street racing.,"Earlier this year, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office filed assault charges against seven men who allegedly threw bottles at an LAPD cruiser and tried to stop officers from making arrests at the scene of a South L.A. street takeover.