In allegations that sent shock waves through academia, federal prosecutors on Tuesday accused top CEOs, two Hollywood actresses and a legendary fashion designer of taking part in an audacious scheme to get their children into elite universities through fraud, bribes and lies.The scheme, which began in 2011, centered around the owner of a for-profit Newport Beach college admissions company that wealthy parents paid to help their children cheat on college entrance exams and to falsify athletic records of students to enable them to secure admission to elite schools, including UCLA, USC, Stanford, Yale and Georgetown, according to court records.Fifty people, across academia and college sports as well as a cadre of super-wealthy parents, have been charged in what prosecutors say is the largest college admissions scam ever prosecuted.,Some parents participated in one aspect of the scheme, while others paid for both, stealing slots from hard-working students with legitimate grades and test scores, authorities said.William Rick Singer, who owns the admissions company called the Edge College Career Network, was charged with money laundering, obstruction of justice, racketeering and conspiracy to defraud the United States.,In at least one instance, a student claimed to have a learning disability to obtain medical documentation required by the College Board and ACT Inc. to grant additional time on the tests, according to court documents.Once the students were given additional time, which generally allowed them to take the test over two days instead of one and in an individual setting, the clients were instructed to change the location of the exam to either a public high school in Houston or a private college preparatory school in West Hollywood that Singer controlled, according to the documents.At those locations, prosecutors allege, Singer bribed test administrators Igor Dvorskiy, of Los Angeles, and Lisa Niki Williams, of Houston, with the parents money to facilitate cheating on the exams.,Singer had a psychologist on his team assign fake learning disabilities to give students an academic advantage, the charges say.Coaches and private admissions counselors allegedly received money for helping to get students admitted as athletes at Yale, Stanford and USC.USC senior associate athletic director Donna Heinel and mens and womens water polo coach Jovan Vavic were alleged to have received bribes totaling more than $1.3 million and $250,000, respectively, to help parents take advantage of the relaxed admissions standards for athletes at USC even though their children were not legitimately being recruited as athletes.,It described spending thousands of dollars on trips for dental students to help needy Cambodians and offering math tutoring to underserved children in Oakland.Prosecutors said the charity was nothing more than a means to launder money to an array of people requiring bribes.Our contributions to major athletic university programs may help to provide placement to students that may not have access under normal channels, the organization stated in tax documents.Federal law enforcement began the investigation, dubbed Operation Varsity Blues, in May 2018, based on a tip from a confidential source who was being interviewed as part of a separate investigation, said FBI Special Agent Joseph Bonavolonta.Make no mistake: This is not a case where parents were acting in the best interests of their children.

Beasley did just that, keeping his finals opponent — Norwell senior Kade Zadylak — raised off the mat often enough to take away some of his scoring chances on the way to an 11-5 victory and a berth in the first round of the State Finals Friday at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis.,Lone defeated Fort Wayne Snider senior Vertis Hawkins by 18-3 technical fall, Mississinewa junior Kyler Funk 8-5 and Garrett senior Austin Leech by 13-0 major decision before losing 3-2 to Jay County junior Mason Winner in the finals.,Senior Adam Hooley (145) and sophomore Ibrahim Khaoucha (195) of Northridge, junior Rasheek Bonds (120) of Goshen, seniors Brandon Bergman (182) and Brian Bergman (285) of Lakeland and senior Isaac Weimer (113) and junior Kyler Brown (126) of West Noble all lost in the second round.,Bowing out in the first round were freshman Jasper Graber (106), sophomore Justin Puckett (113) and junior Caid Lacey of Northridge, freshman Nick Olson (106), seniors Christian Santos (132) and Braxton Rodriguez (138) and junior Kaleb Kilmer (220) and Jose Rosales (285) of Goshen, freshman Ben Miller (113) of Lakeland and junior Shayne Tierney (145) of West Noble.,FORT WAYNE SEMISTATE Team scores: Jimtown 64.5, Huntington North 64, Yorktown 47, Central Noble 44, Oak Hill 41, Fort Wayne Carroll 36, Bellmont 35, Adams Central 32, Western 32, Rochester 31.5, Garrett 28, Norwell 28, Leo 26, Jay County 25, Wabash 24, Prairie Heights 21.5, Homestead 21, Northridge 21, Fairfield 16, NorthWood 15, Columbia City 11, Madison-Grant 11, Manchester 11, Fort Wayne Snider 10, Bluffton 9, Churubusco 8, Eastern 8, Monroe Central 7, Angola 6, Delta 6, East Noble 4, Southern Wells 4.

The Stanley County Buffaloes wrestling team took to the mat on Saturday for the Holland Invitational in Howard.,As a team, the Buffs placed fourth out of 11 teams, finishing the tournament with 131 team points.,Canton won the Holland Invitational with 240.5 team points, which was around 100 team points better than Howard, who took second place.,Junior Isaac Cliff, sophomore Sydney Tubbs, freshman Levi Stover and eighth grader Nathaniel Nelson each placed fourth.,Full Results for Stanley County Buffs wrestlers at Holland Invitational in Howard

195: Nathanial Nelson, 4th read more

NORMAN— The No. 1 Oklahoma men's gymnastics team hosts the No. 8 Ohio State Buckeyes inside McCasland Field House Saturday night at 7 p.m. CT as the Sooners chase their 105th straight victory.,Oklahoma continues its chase for its fifth straight national title on Saturday as the No. 1 Sooners (7-0) welcome No. 8 Ohio State (2-3) to McCasland Field House at 7 p.m. CT.,Entering his 20th season at the helm of OU men’s gymnastics, head coach Mark Williams and his team are aiming at an NCAA men's gym record 12th national championship in 2019.,In the Road to Nationals rankings, OU holds the top team average (414.500) along with the top spot on floor exercise (70.325), still rings (70.025), vault (72.450) and high bar (67.250).,Individually, senior co-captain Genki Suzuki recorded the top all-around score of the season (83.600) in last weekend's home opener, putting him at No. 1 in the all-around ranks.

The Govs kicked off Friday’s dual with three straight victories by Blake Judson, Deegan Houska and Hayden Shaffer.,The Govs and Kernels traded victories through the middle part of the dual.,The Govs clinched a dual victory thanks to a tech fall victory by Maguire Raske, a major decision victory by Garrett Leesman, and a pinfall victory by Gage Gehring.,The Govs were led by Gunnar Gehring, who placed third at 220 pounds.,For full results from this past weekend’s wrestling action, please go to capjournal.com

Full Results for this past weekend’s wrestling action read more

Oklahoma begins its chase for its fifth straight national title on Saturday, as the preseason No. 1 Sooners head west to the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo., to face a challenging slate of opponents at the Rocky Mountain Open.,Senior Yul Moldauer is looking to conclude a historic collegiate career, coming off a junior season in which he earned four individual national titles (AA, FX, VT, PB), in addition to All-America nods on , pommel horse, still rings, vault, parallel bars and all-around.,Other key returners are senior Genki Suzuki, an All-American on pommel horse last season, and junior Tanner Justus, who earned All-America honors on vault in 2018.,Last season marked Moldauer's second all-around national title, after claiming the crown during his freshman season in 2016.,Guimaraes, a product of 5280 Gymnastics in Colorado, finished just behind Goodell in the all-around at the U.S. Championships, claiming fourth, but took home junior national titles on floor exercise and vault.

Tucson attorney Ali Farhang recently phoned Oakland Raiders president Marc Badain, introduced himself and pitched a plan for the Raiders to play their 2019 home schedule at Arizona Stadium.,The man who created the Arizona Bowl and has become part-owner of the indoor football league’s Tucson Sugar Skulls, is not shy about an attempt to execute a grandiose Act III, putting the National Football League in Tucson — if only for a season.,+1 

Before settling in Las Vegas, the NFL’s Raiders would be smart to call Tucson home in 2019, Ali Farhang believes.,Or, perhaps, the Raiders could be creative, schedule a preseason game or two at Arizona Stadium, and play the ’19 regular-season schedule — eight home games — in a variety of Western cities.,In the hallway to his office is a subway sign that reads: read more

Does it matter to most residents of Oregon, Washington, California, Arizona, Utah and Colorado whether their states' major college football programs match those in Alabama or Ohio dollar for dollar and victory for victory?,OK, more links: The O’s James Crepea takes a deep dive into Oregon’s 7-6 victory over Michigan State in the Redbox Bowl, the good, the bad, the encouraging and the discouraging.,Vince Grippi for the Spokesman-Review: Washington’s loss shows the Pac-12 just doesn’t measure up against college football’s elite level.,Joey Kaufman of the Los Angeles Daily News: Washington’s loss to Ohio State is one more Pac-12 disappointment.,Washington wilts in a Rose Bowl loss to Ohio State, leaving the Huskies with bigger questions.

But we also asked our readers—many of whom are deeply engaged and educated on the nuances of food and farming—to share their year-end reflections on what stood out for them in food and ag policy this year.,As we’ve reported before, food waste is also a cause of climate change, and many readers noted that climate change is “the big one.”,Many readers said the 2018 Farm Bill was the biggest story of the year, both because of “the unprecedented political division around it” as well as because “it influences everything impacting agricultural policy in the U.S.” It’s also an example of “the large corporate political pressure that only serves the largest corporate interests at the expense of family farms, taxpayers, and the 99 percent who also have to eat,” wrote L.A. Shapiro from Washington, D.C..,The last-minute passage of the farm bill earlier this month—which followed extensive controversy and political wrangling throughout the year—offered a mixed bag of wins and losses in readers’ eyes.,And finally, Emily Landenberger in Vermont sees promise in the ways industrial hemp, which was fully legalized by the 2018 Farm Bill, might help Vermont farmers.

On the first drive to South Bend, Justin and Jiseop Yoon talked in Korean, like they always do.,Jiseop, 52, arrived in the United States at 13 years old, when his father, a Korean naval officer, sent him to boarding school because they wanted their son to experience the U.S. There, he lived in a foster home and eventually did figure skating at a high level in his native South Korea.,Clockwise from top left: Jiseop, Mihwa, Eric and Justin Yoon.Courtesy of Jiseop Yoon Justin was born in Cincinnati before moving to Korea with his family, where he went to international school.,You're different from all the other kids," Jiseop told Justin.,Justin Yoon kicking for Milton Academy.Photo courtesy of Jiseop Yoon For high school, Justin was sent to Milton Academy, hand-selected by Jiseop because of its academic and equally important athletic fit.