As the pandemic abruptly turned life upside down around the world, roughly a million public school kids in NYC were thrust into a wildly inconsistent learning environment, with repeated openings and closings of school buildings and systemwide shifts to online learning as COVID-19 rates surge.,While education officials promise to reopen schools this fall for full-time learning again, many New York City parents and students are calling for more than academic recovery, but a reckoning with the disrupted school system’s mental health toll on kids.,A Year Of Anxiety And Turmoil In the short term after Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that public school buildings were closing on March 16th, 2020 and students were shifting to remote learning, some kids said they initially celebrated a break from school.,Disparate Impacts For New York City’s public school system, whose enrollment is 41% Latino, 26% Black, 16% Asian and 15% white, the deadly toll of the pandemic has been acutely felt: “During the first five months of the pandemic, an estimated 4,200 of 4 million children in the state lost a parent or caregiver to coronavirus, a rate of more than one out of every 1,000, according to a report by the United Hospital Fund and Boston Consulting Group released at the end of September,” with more than half of those affected children residents of the Bronx, Brooklyn or Queens, according to Gotham Gazette, which reported the pandemic has disportionately taken parents away from Black and Hispanic families: 1 out of every 600 Black children, and 1 out of every 700 Hispanic children have lost a parent or caregiver, compared to 1 out of 1,400 Asian children and 1 out of 1,500 white children in New York.,The public school student population is also primarily low-income, a point which was hammered home last spring when the city Department of Education had to scramble to outfit hundreds of thousands of families with devices for remote learning.

In 2020, like so many other Summer programs, 125-year-old Camp Courant was forced to hold their activities virtually.,FARMINGTON, Conn. — Camp Courant is the oldest free Summer camp in the country, offering the chance for more than 700 Hartford kids a day to come to enjoy an outdoor experience on more than 30 acres by Batterson Park.,In 2020, like so many other Summer programs, 125-year-old Camp Courant was forced to hold their activities virtually.,“We’re not just thinking about Summer, we are planning for Summer,” said Corrianne Chipello, Camp Courant’s new executive director.,In West Hartford, Steve Boyle, the co-director of 2-4-1 Sports says he plans to have his camps open not just in Connecticut but also with Summer programs happening in the Philadelphia area, Boulder, Colorado, and Vancouver, British Colombia.

It’s been many years, but at one time my daughter Curly Girl had a box full of tiny kittens she’d found in front of the grocery store hidden in her room, and it took me an embarrassingly long time to realize this.,When the kids were younger, I blamed this on swim parties, assuming that they took a towel over to swim at a friend’s house and never brought it home.,In the fall, I even ordered a hotel industry pack of eight white bath towels and gave four each to the kids, telling them, “These are your towels now.,I’m not entirely sure why my son needs three towels per shower, considering he likes to walk around virtually naked the rest of the time, but I can promise you he will never reuse any of them.,That’s why it was so exciting to discover this unexpected cache of bath towels inside the detritus of Cheetah Boy’s closet.

San Clemente High football assistant coach Joe Wood, who was the head coach at Aliso Niguel when it won a CIF championship, died Friday night.,He was Aliso Niguel’s first varsity football head coach.,Wood coached Aliso Niguel from the 1993 season through the 2005 season.,His replacement after the ’05 season was Jeff Veeder, who was an Aliso assistant coach.,Kurt Westling was on the ’96 championship team coaching staff at Aliso Niguel and would later become the school’s third head coach in 2010.

The executive committee for the Central Coast Section, the governing body for high school athletics in five northern California counties — San Mateo, Santa Clara, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Cruz — and a few private schools in San Francisco, approved plans this week for sports teams to return to practice amid the coronavirus pandemic.,A handful of sports are scheduled to return to competition Jan. 25, though no competition can be held until local stay-at-home orders are lifted, and the section left it up to leagues to move the seasons of all sports as they see fit.,The only downside for leagues moving low-contact sports — those allowed to play in the state’s purple tier — into the section’s Season 1 (Jan. 25 start date) is missing out on the possibility of playoffs.,The North Coast Section, which announced its plans Thursday to rearrange its whole schedule to allow low-contact sports first, eliminated playoff plans for both seasons.,But the East Bay’s Diablo Athletic League already announced Friday afternoon that it was rearranging its schedule to move purple-tier sports up in its calendar to allow for more competition.

The executive committee for the Central Coast Section, the governing body for high school athletics in five northern California counties — San Mateo, Santa Clara, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Cruz — and a few private schools in San Francisco, approved plans this week for sports teams to return to practice amid the coronavirus pandemic.,A handful of sports are scheduled to return to competition Jan. 25, though no competition can be held until local stay-at-home orders are lifted, and the section left it up to leagues to move the seasons of all sports as they see fit.,The only downside for leagues moving low-contact sports — those allowed to play in the state’s purple tier — into the section’s Season 1 (Jan. 25 start date) is missing out on the possibility of playoffs.,The North Coast Section, which announced its plans Thursday to rearrange its whole schedule to allow low-contact sports first, eliminated playoff plans for both seasons.,But the East Bay’s Diablo Athletic League already announced Friday afternoon that it was rearranging its schedule to move purple-tier sports up in its calendar to allow for more competition.

Conn. (WTNH) — The Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference (CIAC) announced Thursday that school winter sports may begin on Jan. 19.,In a plan released on Thursday, which was created with the Connecticut Department of Public Health’s (DPH) guidelines, the CIAC said low, moderate, and high-risk winter sports will be able to practice starting Jan. 19, unless determined otherwise.,For high risk sports, officials do not recommend any activities beyond small group conditioning and non-contact skill building for the whole season.,While the CIAC gave the go-ahead to the winter sports season, they decided not to go forward with spring football.,AJ Robinson on the Branford High School wrestling team said, “Wrestling, it’s a sport that will teach you life lessons.