Since 2013, Irvine residents have expected to see as many as 9,500 homes built around the Great Park, under an agreement between the city and developer FivePoint Holdings.,Now the upper limit could grow to 10,556 homes, after FivePoint affiliate Heritage Fields asked recently to change how some of the homes are counted – subtracting the affordable units that are being built and providing leeway to build more homes overall.,FivePoint CEO Emile Haddad said Monday the proposal would simply use the city’s existing rules meant to encourage development of affordable housing, and adding more homes of any kind could help ease traffic by allowing some of the thousands of people who commute to jobs in Irvine to live there as well.,FivePoint is using a city rule to designate all the affordable homes as “additive,” which means they wouldn’t count toward the total number that can be built, so the developer could build that many more market-rate homes.,It’s the first time the city has gotten a request to change the designation of already-built homes, and it’s the first request to use the city’s “additive” provision on a project that already took advantage of a state law granting the right to build more homes if the project includes a certain percentage for low-income residents, according to a city report.

For all the speculative capital pouring into the city from China and elsewhere, the L.A. area suffers the highest levels of crowding, the greatest levels of poverty, the least affordable housing, the lowest homeownership rates and the second-largest concentration of homeless in the nation.,Gentrification is a function of real estate speculation

Compared to other more traditional cities, such as New York or Chicago, multi-polar L.A.’s gentrification reflects less organic development than massive real estate speculation, supported by public dollars and policy.,In a new report on gentrification nationwide co-authored with Karla Lopez del Rio and Chapman University researcher  Kenneth Murphy, released by the Center for Opportunity Urbanism, barely 1 percent of the city of Los Angeles has gentrified, mostly around downtown.,In 2015, a real estate firm littered downtown L.A.’s Arts District with a “Why Rent Downtown When You Could Own in Boyle Heights?”,If Garcetti wants to make a case for L.A.’s future, not to mention his, he needs to refocus urban policy away from real estate speculation and gentrification to one that serves the need of most middle- and working-class Angelenos. read more

For all the speculative capital pouring into the city from China and elsewhere, the L.A. area suffers the highest levels of crowding, the greatest levels of poverty, the least affordable housing, the lowest homeownership rates and the second-largest concentration of homeless in the nation.,Gentrification is a function of real estate speculation

Compared to other more traditional cities, such as New York or Chicago, multi-polar L.A.’s gentrification reflects less organic development than massive real estate speculation, supported by public dollars and policy.,In a new report on gentrification nationwide co-authored with Karla Lopez del Rio and Chapman University researcher  Kenneth Murphy, released by the Center for Opportunity Urbanism, barely 1 percent of the city of Los Angeles has gentrified, mostly around downtown.,In 2015, a real estate firm littered downtown L.A.’s Arts District with a “Why Rent Downtown When You Could Own in Boyle Heights?”,If Garcetti wants to make a case for L.A.’s future, not to mention his, he needs to refocus urban policy away from real estate speculation and gentrification to one that serves the need of most middle- and working-class Angelenos. read more

Seneca Regional Planning Commission and CT Consultants, a firm developing a multi-jurisdictional comprehensive plan for Seneca County, took another step toward their ultimate goal Monday when they hosted a community forum to gather public input.,During his introduction, Mayor Aaron Montz said Seneca County decided to take an overall approach to strategic planning rather than each political entity creating its own plan.,Montz and Chris Hopkins, of CT Consultants, said the overall vision created so far in the planning process includes making Seneca County:

• A leader in leveraging our assets (people, places, resources) within a balanced, sustainable framework in a manner that honors our past, strengthens our existing assets, and anticipates, plans for and embraces the future.,Hopkins provided an overview of the planning process so far as well as background on Seneca County.,So far, she said the planning process has included meeting with stakeholders in each of the participating entities, an online survey to be completed by everyone in the county, a steering committee and now the public forums. read more

LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) – Landlords in unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County will only be allowed to hike rents by 3 percent per year on certain apartments under a new temporary ordinance that took effect Thursday.,The county Board of Supervisors approved the temporary Rent Stabilization Ordinance in November.,It’s similar to the city of L.A.’s Rent Stabilization Ordinance, which also allows landlords to increase rent by only 3 percent every year for rent-controlled units built before 1979.,Supervisor Sheila Kuehl, who championed the plan to limit rents while the county considers longer-term solutions, said an estimated 200,000 renters will be protected by the county ordinance.,“Several recent local studies indicate that rent stabilization, thoughtfully adopted with other market regulation measures, can successfully protect tenants at risk of eviction with minimal negative impact on the housing market,” Kuehl said.