With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting��exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

Understanding what motivates these future managers and CEOs is important for any organisation, especially as generational stereotypes abound in many workplaces and, combined with each group’s belief their values are the ‘right ones’, often cause conflicts.,The research explored the expectations and values young millennials (born 1992–1999) prioritise when considering ethics in New Zealand workplaces and found three distinct groups: the Achiever, the Ethical Employee and the Public Conservationist.,“The Achievers’ expectations are to add value to the organisation they work for and see the tasks at work as the main priority, while workplace ethics are seen as something secondary to work and they therefore do not put much emphasis on them,” says Øvrebø.,According to Øvrebø, Public Conservationists draw strong connections between business, society, the environment and the wider world, and expect organisations and people to take their share of the environmental and public responsibility.,People in this group also expect to be working under a CEO with strong integrity, and instead of focusing on ethics within the workplace, the key ethics valued by the Public Conservationist focus on the organisation’s external impact.

Understanding what motivates these future managers and CEOs is important for any organisation, especially as generational stereotypes abound in many workplaces and, combined with each group’s belief their values are the ‘right ones’, often cause conflicts.,The research explored the expectations and values young millennials (born 1992–1999) prioritise when considering ethics in New Zealand workplaces and found three distinct groups: the Achiever, the Ethical Employee and the Public Conservationist.,“The Achievers’ expectations are to add value to the organisation they work for and see the tasks at work as the main priority, while workplace ethics are seen as something secondary to work and they therefore do not put much emphasis on them,” says Øvrebø.,According to Øvrebø, Public Conservationists draw strong connections between business, society, the environment and the wider world, and expect organisations and people to take their share of the environmental and public responsibility.,People in this group also expect to be working under a CEO with strong integrity, and instead of focusing on ethics within the workplace, the key ethics valued by the Public Conservationist focus on the organisation’s external impact.