Since 2013, Irvine residents have expected to see as many as 9,500 homes built around the Great Park, under an agreement between the city and developer FivePoint Holdings.,Now the upper limit could grow to 10,556 homes, after FivePoint affiliate Heritage Fields asked recently to change how some of the homes are counted – subtracting the affordable units that are being built and providing leeway to build more homes overall.,FivePoint CEO Emile Haddad said Monday the proposal would simply use the city’s existing rules meant to encourage development of affordable housing, and adding more homes of any kind could help ease traffic by allowing some of the thousands of people who commute to jobs in Irvine to live there as well.,FivePoint is using a city rule to designate all the affordable homes as “additive,” which means they wouldn’t count toward the total number that can be built, so the developer could build that many more market-rate homes.,It’s the first time the city has gotten a request to change the designation of already-built homes, and it’s the first request to use the city’s “additive” provision on a project that already took advantage of a state law granting the right to build more homes if the project includes a certain percentage for low-income residents, according to a city report.

It’s been 14 years since Ohio raised the rate of tax on motor fuel.,Hearings today, Wednesday and Thursday are before the House Finance Committee on the fiscal year 2020-2021 transportation budget, House Bill 62 and the proposal to raise Ohio’s motor fuel tax by 18 cents.,The last time the motor fuel tax was raised was in 2005, according to the Greater Ohio Policy Center, when the Ohio legislature increased the rate by 2 cents per gallon from 26 cents per gallon to the current 28 cents per gallon.,If Ohio legislators were to pass the increase in March, Pennsylvania would still keep the highest motor fuel tax rate of states bordering Ohio.,The Ohio Municipal League, County Commissioners Association of Ohio and the Ohio Township Association have all released positions in support of the tax increase in the last week.

The top two Republicans in the Connecticut House of Representatives enter the 2019 legislative session with far less clout as a result of stinging 2018 election losses.,“I think getting people into a room on any issue you can find common ground regardless of your party affiliation and that’s going to be our role this session,” said Rep. Vincent Candelora (R-North Branford, the deputy minority leader for House Republicans.,Sen. Martin Looney (D- New Haven), the top member of the Senate, said, “We will need to have tolls because of the reality that our gasoline tax cannot be relied upon to meet our infrastructure needs in the future.”,Rep. Themis Klarides, (R- Derby), the top Republican in the House, recommended cutting off peak service on the new CT Rail line that connects Springfield, Hartford and New Haven, and she recommended cutting similar service on CTFastrak, the busway that connects Hartford to New Britain.,Democratic leaders in both the House and Senate support wide-scale toll programs for all vehicles, while Governor-elect Ned Lamont has said he supports tolls only for trucks.