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'Mamba mentality': Stolen Kobe Bryant jersey returned after two years A signed Kobe Bryant jersey that was stolen from a display case at his alma mater has been returned after more than two years, according to ESPN.,'Mamba mentality': Stolen Kobe Bryant jersey returned after two years A signed Kobe Bryant jersey that was stolen from a display case at his alma mater — Lower Merion High School in Ardmore, Pennsylvania — has been returned after more than two years, according to a story from ESPN detailing the jersey's unique journey.,The jersey was purchased online by Liu Zhe, a diehard Bryant fan from China, last October for around $2,000 as another piece for his collection commemorating the Los Angeles Lakers legend, according to ESPN.,After buying it, though, Liu said he noticed that the jersey looked awfully similar to the one that was stolen from the high school's display case in 2017, along with other Bryant items.,YOUR DAILY DOSE: Top sports headlines, delivered daily Kobe Bryant photographed on court at Lower Merion High School (Photo: Eileen Blass, USA TODAY) read more

With the shutdown of the newspaper in September 2018, this area in central Missouri's Ozark hills joined more than 1,400 other cities across the United States to lose a newspaper over the past 15 years, according to an Associated Press analysis of data compiled by the University North Carolina.,With the shutdown of the newspaper in September 2018, this area in central Missouri's Ozark hills joined more than ... more

Photo: Orlin Wagner, AP read more

Finally, it creates redundancy that leads to a more robust work architecture that helps us spread knowledge and do things in a way that other people on the team can pick up if necessary.,Diversity in culture, gender, age, academics, technical discipline, and expertise creates a platform for real innovation that is critical to the safe, efficient, and profitable development of hydrocarbon-based energy.,With all of this diversity, “soft skills”—social and emotional intelligence, a positive and flexible attitude, and communication skills—are crucial to helping people navigate their environment, work well with others, perform well, and achieve their goals.,My community is deep and wide, and it includes people of all ages and walks of life, and from different disciplines, industries, geographies, races, cultures, and genders.,From the very first wells to today and into the foreseeable future, petroleum engineers have, and will continue, to “do the impossible” by inventing and applying technologies and methodologies that make oil and gas the safe, low-cost energy source that dri

But now Lawrence and thousands of other Connecticut residents are alarmed by what they perceive as a threat to their children’s’ education posed by several bills under consideration in the legislature, including one from Gov. Ned Lamont, which they believe would force or coerce communities into regionalizing their school systems or sharing superintendents.,“Small local school districts that choose to have inefficient governance structures and too many expensive superintendents can no longer expect the state to bear the costs of these decisions,” Lamont’s budget documents says.,Small districts — defined as having fewer than 10,000 residents, fewer than 2,000 students or with only one or two elementary schools — that have their own superintendent would be required to “receive direction concerning the supervision of [its] schools” from another district’s superintendent or name a ‘chief executive officer’ to oversee the schools, according to Lamont’s proposal, Senate Bill 874.,Another key portion of Lamont’s bill would give priority for bonding to larger schools and districts that pool resources, share superintendents and back-office functions.,Another aspect of the bill that is troubling for some is the establishment of a Commission on Shared School Services to develop a plan “for the redistricting or consolidation of school services and school districts.”

“We want to put a public park in where people could go rock climbing, biking, hiking and we can create a pollinator refuge,” explained Tiffany Harvey, executive director of the Friends of the Lower Muskingum River, a 501c3 nonprofit which works on environmental conservation in Washington County.,Commissioner Kevin Ritter explained both in a public statement published to his Facebook page and in a private interview Thursday that while he supports the idea FLMR has for the property, he takes issue with the approach and state funding structure.,“If we remove land from the inventory this way, we remove money from the tax base,” he explained Thursday, assuming that purchasing the property through the Clean Ohio Fund would remove the parcels from taxable real estate within the county.,Washington County Auditor Matthew Livengood said Friday that the current annual property tax on the property is $1,086, a rate which would stay in place if the nonprofit purchases the property regardless of what funds, public or private, are used.,Harvey said in response to Ritter’s Facebook statement Thursday that she doesn’t agree on all points, arguing that businesses invest in areas where there are higher property values, the property in question has been on the market for six years with no takers and disagreeing on the philosophy not to use conservation funds in place for the public.

During the Feb. 21 Washington County commissioners meeting, Harvey requested the commissioners give their approval for her organization’s project.,The fund would give up to 75 percent of the cost of the land and requires the Washington County commissioners and the Fairfield Township trustees to approve the project before FLMR could apply.,During the presentation, it was shown that in 2008, 62 percent of Washington County voters supported the start of the Clean Ohio Fund.,Harvey said she encouraged any resident of Washington County that is 18 or over to sign their petition on the Friends of Lower Muskingum River’s Facebook page to help convince the commissioners to change their minds about the project.,Harvey also said the latest the FLMR can apply for the Clean Ohio Fund is April 12 at 4 p.m.

“We would like to get the support of our commissioners ASAP, so we can get the process underway,” she said. read more

During the Feb. 21 Washington County commissioners meeting, Harvey requested the commissioners give their approval for her organization’s project.,The fund would give up to 75 percent of the cost of the land and requires the Washington County commissioners and the Fairfield Township trustees to approve the project before FLMR could apply.,During the presentation, it was shown that in 2008, 62 percent of Washington County voters supported the start of the Clean Ohio Fund.,Harvey said she encouraged any resident of Washington County that is 18 or over to sign their petition on the Friends of Lower Muskingum River’s Facebook page to help convince the commissioners to change their minds about the project.,Harvey also said the latest the FLMR can apply for the Clean Ohio Fund is April 12 at 4 p.m.

“We would like to get the support of our commissioners ASAP, so we can get the process underway,” she said. read more

The President Chief Medical Officer of Virgin Pulse, Dr. Rajiv Kumar, discusses the benefits of workplace wellness programs for employees with HR Technologist.,Key takeaways from this interview:

Complete guide to workplace wellness for talent managers read more

Tryouts: Sunday, March 17, 2-5 p.m. at Mystic Indoor sports for all baseball and softball players ages 8-12 For questions, email London Babe Ruth — Spring registration is open online at newlondonbaberuth.weebly.com.,Waterford/Montville Babe Ruth 13U-14U travel teams — Evaluations are March 3 at Mystic Indoor Sports (90 Welles Road) from 9-11 a.m. No fee to attend, but is mandatory for players interested in travel teams.,Contact: Joe Auwood, (860) 443-1523 of email [email protected]

CT Crush softball — Looking for players for 10U, 12U, 14U and 16U teams.,Contact: [email protected] read more

Jim DeFrancia, a principal at Lowe and a local representative for the firm, said the claims are untrue.,Representatives from Unite Here Local 11 didn't answer numerous questions from The Aspen Times about their campaign against the ballot question, including how they were alerted to the local election.,Roxana Aslan, a research analyst for Local 11 and the designated representative listed with the city, did not answer questions about the union's social media campaign.,In an email response to the questions posed by The Aspen Times, Aslan restated the union's claims about Lowe Enterprises.,The Aspen City Council approved a public-private partnership with the developers of Lift One Lodge, a timeshare project that also is part of the ballot question.