BOSTON (CBS) — Bill Belichick and Nick Saban have done their share of winning on the football field.,Prior to that championship tilt, Belichick sat down with ESPN’s Tom Rinaldi to chat about his relationship with Saban, which dates back to the early 1980s when Saban was coaching with Belichick’s father at the Naval Academy.,Belichick hired Saban to be his defensive coordinator in Cleveland in 1991, and even when they were AFC East foes in 2005 (when Saban was head coach of the Miami Dolphins), Saban made sure to attend the funeral for Belichick’s father despite it taking place in the middle of a game week.,So the two all-time coaches have a pretty good feel for each other, which led to some interesting responses during Rinaldi’s sitdown (Saban also shared his thoughts on Belichick for the piece).,And while Belichick probably doesn’t like to see his buddy lose on the biggest stage, Monday night’s Alabama loss may be good news for the Patriots.

In their first season in Indianapolis, head coach Frank Reich, left, and offensive coordinator and Jamestown native Nick Sirianni have guided the Colts into the playoffs.,Father Fran, a member of the Chautauqua Sports Hall of Fame, coached Southwestern High School from the mid-1970s to the early 1980s; brother Mike is the head coach at Washington & Jefferson College where he has compiled one of the best winning percentages in the NCAA; and brother Jay coached Southwestern to a pair of New York State Public High School Athletic Association championships in 2008 and 2009.,Once the youngest Sirianni arrived at the University of Mount Union, he played for Larry Kehres, who guided the Purple Raiders to 11 national championships in his career.,Upon his graduation, Sirianni began his climb up the coaching ranks with stops at Mount Union, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, the Kansas Chiefs and the San Diego/Los Angeles Chargers, before joining Reich’s staff in Indianapolis last February.,“One of the reasons I’m in the position I’m in now is because of the successful coaches I’ve been around, starting with growing up in a coach’s house, learning how to coach with my brothers, and then, obviously, playing for the most successful coach in NCAA football history in Larry Kehres,” he told The Post-Journal last October.

Just a few weeks ago, Cleary held in his hands for the first time, his first album: Key & Cleary “Love is the Way,” an anthology of 22 songs that he and his fellow musicians recorded throughout the 1970s and into the early 1980s in Buffalo.,Each track of the double disc album tells a story: Cleary’s journey from the East Side of Buffalo to the Marine Corps, to owning his own construction company to running the computer department at Dunkirk Ice Cream.,While themes of black empowerment are evident in some tracks, Key and Cleary’s music evolved over the years to take on more universal themes and expressions.,Producer David Griffiths, a long-time fan of Key and Cleary, brought their music to Alapatt’s attention, about two years ago.,Key and Cleary, as with many of their songs over the years, re-recorded and produced their music, especially “What It Takes to Live.”

He was well known in the region for his love of baseball and his coaching abilities, serving for 12 years as the pitching coach for the University of Virginia baseball team, head coach of the Staunton Braves of the Valley Baseball League and the Miller School, where he led the team to a state championship in 2006.,Snook taught government and psychology at Lane and Charlottesville High schools from 1972 to 1980 and was very active in city politics, social organizations and civil rights efforts.,He taught in the Department of Pediatrics at the UVa Medical School and served for 10 years as its chairman.,The Orange County High School football standout was working out in a non-contact drill with the University of Maine football team when he told a coach he felt like he was going to pass out.,She served on the Orange County School Board for 21 years, 10 as board chairwoman.