In their first season in Indianapolis, head coach Frank Reich, left, and offensive coordinator and Jamestown native Nick Sirianni have guided the Colts into the playoffs.,Father Fran, a member of the Chautauqua Sports Hall of Fame, coached Southwestern High School from the mid-1970s to the early 1980s; brother Mike is the head coach at Washington & Jefferson College where he has compiled one of the best winning percentages in the NCAA; and brother Jay coached Southwestern to a pair of New York State Public High School Athletic Association championships in 2008 and 2009.,Once the youngest Sirianni arrived at the University of Mount Union, he played for Larry Kehres, who guided the Purple Raiders to 11 national championships in his career.,Upon his graduation, Sirianni began his climb up the coaching ranks with stops at Mount Union, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, the Kansas Chiefs and the San Diego/Los Angeles Chargers, before joining Reich’s staff in Indianapolis last February.,“One of the reasons I’m in the position I’m in now is because of the successful coaches I’ve been around, starting with growing up in a coach’s house, learning how to coach with my brothers, and then, obviously, playing for the most successful coach in NCAA football history in Larry Kehres,” he told The Post-Journal last October.

Dr. Diane Hamilton’s latest book, “Cracking the Curiosity Code,” which includes a forward written by billionaire former Chairman and CEO of DocuSign, Keith Krach, has been lauded by distinguished business leaders including Steve Forbes, Ken Fisher, and many others.,In addition to the book, Hamilton created the Curiosity Code Index (CCI), which determines the factors that impact curiosity.,Dr. Hamilton’s research has been featured in a variety of peer-reviewed journals and is the basis of the Curiosity Code Index (CCI) assessment, which is an instrument used to determine factors that impact curiosity.,At Tonerra, Dr. Hamilton’s group aims to help companies strengthen their employees’ level of engagement, innovation, and productivity.,Original Source: Ground-Breaking New Book by Behavioral Expert Dr. Diane Hamilton Has Been Lauded by Distinguished Business Leaders

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Dr. Diane Hamilton's latest book, "Cracking the Curiosity Code," which includes a forward written by billionaire former Chairman and CEO of DocuSign, Keith Krach, has been lauded by distinguished business leaders including Steve Forbes, Ken Fisher, and many others.,In addition to the book, Hamilton created the Curiosity Code Index® (CCI), which determines the factors that impact curiosity.,Individuals and organizations can access the book, assessment, and other materials at are the experts saying about "Cracking the Curiosity Code" and the Curiosity Code Index?,Dr. Hamilton's research has been featured in a variety of peer-reviewed journals and is the basis of the Curiosity Code Index® (CCI) assessment, which is an instrument used to determine factors that impact curiosity.,At Tonerra, Dr. Hamilton's group aims to help companies strengthen their employees' level of engagement, innovation, and productivity.

Since the passage of Title IX in 1972, the number of women participating in sports has skyrocketed, increasing 560 percent at the college level, yet women continue to be underrepresented in exercise science research—both as participants in general studies and as the specific subject of scientific inquiry—creating huge gaps in knowledge about female physiology and performance.,With more men participating in sports in general compared to women, there were simply more males to choose from in the potential pool of research subjects.,When women and men play the same sports by the same rules and use the same equipment (say, in soccer), women have a 50 percent higher concussion rate, according to a 2015 study in JAMA Pediatrics.,A 2017 study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found that, of 207 male and female athletes evaluated for concussion, women presented a greater number and severity of symptoms.,Snedaker says variations between male and female brain injury patterns emerge around puberty—premenstrual girls have similar outcomes to men—and a woman���s monthly cycle may also affect recovery and end results.

The study showed, to varying degrees, the constraints were associated with greater knee abduction moment, which can increase the possibility of anterior cruciate ligament injury, according to lead author Ajit Chaudhari, PhD, FACSM, an associate professor of physical therapy, mechanical engineering, biomedical engineering, and orthopedics at The Ohio State University in Columbus.,Although the study did not compare kinematics or kinetics during offensive and defensive actions, Monfort said the effects of ball handling could have been offset by other factors that can also affect biomechanics.,In basketball, defensive moves tend to occur in response to movements by an offensive player that are hard for the defender to anticipate; this may play a greater role in terms of injury risk than any potential effects of ball handling, Monfort noted.,Carrying a piece of sports equipment can compound the effects of unanticipated movements and other variables that can increase injury risk, experts said.,Monfort was the lead author of a 2017 study presented in June at the annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine9 investigating how visual memory (as determined using the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Test [ImPACT] battery) influenced the effect of soccer-ball dribbling on biomechanics in male athletes.

The study showed, to varying degrees, the constraints were associated with greater knee abduction moment, which can increase the possibility of anterior cruciate ligament injury, according to lead author Ajit Chaudhari, PhD, FACSM, an associate professor of physical therapy, mechanical engineering, biomedical engineering, and orthopedics at The Ohio State University in Columbus.,Although the study did not compare kinematics or kinetics during offensive and defensive actions, Monfort said the effects of ball handling could have been offset by other factors that can also affect biomechanics.,In basketball, defensive moves tend to occur in response to movements by an offensive player that are hard for the defender to anticipate; this may play a greater role in terms of injury risk than any potential effects of ball handling, Monfort noted.,Carrying a piece of sports equipment can compound the effects of unanticipated movements and other variables that can increase injury risk, experts said.,Monfort was the lead author of a 2017 study presented in June at the annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine9 investigating how visual memory (as determined using the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Test [ImPACT] battery) influenced the effect of soccer-ball dribbling on biomechanics in male athletes.

Many scientists struggle to take time away from the never-ending demands of research — and to flout the pervasive culture of overwork — to pursue personal interests., The first step in cultivating a hobby is to deliberately set aside personal time in which to pursue it, says Bailey Sousa, Clark’s co-author and director of the International Institute for Qualitative Methodology at the University of Alberta., He spends up to ten hours per week on hobbies, and explained in a 2013 blogpost that he found a good work–life balance when maintaining three extracurricular interests., Hertzberg has enjoyed building with Lego since she was a child, and Clark says that looking back at childhood interests is a great place to start when seeking a hobby., Dean Simonton, a retired psychologist at the University of California, Davis, suggests that researchers analyse their own dispositions for clues about which pastimes might be the best fit for them.

On Monday, Maddon posted on Twitter: "My brother ... your voice and thoughts shall remain in my mind forever ... our work continues ... 'Attitude is a Decision" #BreatheDeep"

CHICAGO -- Ken Ravizza, a pioneer in sports psychology who worked closely with Cubs manager Joe Maddon and Angels skipper Mike Scioscia, passed away Sunday night., CHICAGO -- Ken Ravizza, a pioneer in sports psychology who worked closely with Cubs manager Joe Maddon and Angels skipper Mike Scioscia, passed away Sunday night., On Monday, Maddon posted on Twitter: "My brother ... your voice and thoughts shall remain in my mind forever ... our work continues ... 'Attitude is a Decision" #BreatheDeep" read more

Crucially, the differences in this dwell time of the quiet eye don’t just predict the overall differences between elite and novice players; fluctuations in the onset and duration of the quiet eye can also explain lapses in the athlete’s individual performance, which would again reaffirm the idea that it is itself a critical part of the mental processes., Camilo Sáenz-Moncaleano, who recently examined the quiet eye in tennis players, suspects that most athletes had not made a conscious decision to change their eye movements; for many it’s probably a behaviour that they picked up implicitly., In one of the first tests of quiet eye training, Vickers took a university basketball team and hooked them up to her eye-tracking devices so that they could become more aware of their gaze as they practiced ‘free throws’., But this was not just a one-off result: quiet eye training has since helped many other amateur and professional athletes – including national volleyball teams and Olympic skeet shooters – to achieve their potential., A University of Exeter study, for instance, has found that quiet eye training can help children with coordination problems improve their physical abilities, contradicting a commonly held belief that they instead suffered from some problem with the motor system itself.

But they can be very distressing to those who experience them, and they may be surprisingly common among student athletes," said senior author Michael Grandner, PhD, MTR, the director of the Sleep and Health Research Program and assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Arizona College of Medicine., Data were collected from 189 NCAA Division-I student athletes, who were asked how often they experienced the symptoms of sleep paralysis and hypnogogic/hypnopompic hallucinations., In addition, sleep symptoms such as sleep paralysis and hallucinations are more common in younger adults., "These sleep symptoms are usually harmless on their own, but they can be a sign of more serious sleep problems," said lead author Serena Liu, a student research assistant in the Sleep and Health Research Program directed by Grander., Abstract Title: Sleep Paralysis and Hypnogogic/Hypnopompic Hallucinations: Prevalence in Student Athletes and Relationship to Depressive Symptoms