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While it makes intuitive sense that effective goals for fourth graders differ from those made by juniors in high school, it’s important for parents and coaches to understand how to help youth athletes make and achieve appropriate goals.,In addition to an athlete’s competitive or training maturity, Dr. Kraus encourages parents and coaches to consider the source of an athlete’s motivation when it comes to establishing appropriate goals.,If an athlete exhibits high intrinsic motivation early on by prioritizing personal achievement and what success feels like rather than what it looks like, then coaches and parents can help the athlete progress by encouraging the pursuit of extrinsic goals (winning).,In her experience, Dr. Kraus says young athletes tend to impose harsher consequences on themselves for perceived failures compared to the consequences parents and coaches would normally deem reasonable.,To counter the bias toward criticism, coaches and parents should encourage young athletes to establish concrete consequences and rewards related to effort (not outcomes). read more

Looking deeper still and conducting, further research into this area, I was taken to work by Hansen & Gorton (2013); they critiqued numerous analytical definitions of ‘affect’ provided by Shouse (2005), Blackman & Cromby (2007), Clough (2007), Cvetkovich (2003), Ahmed (2010), Highmore (2010), and Stewart and Wissinger (2007).,However, regarding ‘affect’, I found this definition by Hansen & Gorton’s (2013 p34) a cause for concern, especially when considering videogames and games design:

“the slipperiness of the term and its usage within academic study” and “the notion of in-between-ness and liminality is structured into the definition of affect and makes coming to full interpretations of emotion online increasingly impossible.”,As the main area of focus within the theoretical framework of my PhD is Games Design within the context of videogames, doubt was instilled within me by Hansen & Gorton’s secondary research.,Hansen & Gorton go onto further analyse this, considering that “affect is a sort of glue”; when applied to ideas, values and objects (such as videogames), they can be affective and remain with us throughout life, both as individuals and as a means of “sustaining gatherings of people or ideas” i.e. the audiences themselves.,As ‘People’ are a key object of study within my research, I therefore decided to firstly preface addressing any further research into ‘affect’ along with research into the ‘videogame design and development process’ by researching and reviewing the existing organisational structures within which these ‘people’ (i.e. ‘the game developers’) work. read more

But she says the real challenge in her family is screen time.,“To get them to be healthy, we have to keep fighting their screen time urge.”,Pat Jesten says she feels comfortable with the screen time her teenage son Chris gets.,When it comes to the right amount of screen time, exercise, and sleep, research published this month in JAMA Pediatrics finds only 5% of teens are meeting guidelines, and girls are less likely to do so than boys.,All children between the ages of 6 and 18 should get at least 1 hour of moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise a day, and should limit screen time and exposure to all screen-based digital media to less than 2 hours in a 24-hour period.

“Giving ambitious employees the autonomy and opportunities to pursue passions is a great way to intrinsically motivate them, and provides ways for them to advance in their careers and make them feel fulfilled,” she says.,“It sends the message to your ambitious employees that their career is an important topic to you–and it provides an explicit platform for them to share their ambitions and get feedback,” says LeBold.,People change during their careers, and companies should be willing to change with them, says DeLisa Alexander, executive vice president and chief people officer at open source software provider Red Hat.,While compensation is important, your best talent wants a sense of purpose within your company, says Amy Veater, head of people and culture at Avi Networks, cloud application services provider.,Or just focus on being a great employer While retention is top of mind, employers should start thinking about what makes a company a great place to work–that’s what keeps the most ambitious employees happy, says Tracy Cote, chief people officer at Genesys, a customer experience platform.

“Giving ambitious employees the autonomy and opportunities to pursue passions is a great way to intrinsically motivate them, and provides ways for them to advance in their careers and make them feel fulfilled,” she says.,“It sends the message to your ambitious employees that their career is an important topic to you–and it provides an explicit platform for them to share their ambitions and get feedback,” says LeBold.,People change during their careers, and companies should be willing to change with them, says DeLisa Alexander, executive vice president and chief people officer at open source software provider Red Hat.,While compensation is important, your best talent wants a sense of purpose within your company, says Amy Veater, head of people and culture at Avi Networks, cloud application services provider.,Or just focus on being a great employer While retention is top of mind, employers should start thinking about what makes a company a great place to work–that’s what keeps the most ambitious employees happy, says Tracy Cote, chief people officer at Genesys, a customer experience platform.

Tom Walker was a quiet and considerate pupil at Monmouth School for Boys and his unexpected death last June, aged just 13, has been felt by the whole community.,Swim for Tom was organised by Tom’s 13-year-old sister Holly, Deputy Head Girl at Monmouth School for Girls, Katie Cameron, and Director of Sport, Miss Lou Scott.,Mr Tom Arrand, Acting Head at Monmouth School for Girls, reflected: “In 20 years of teaching, I have never witnessed a more impressive student-led event than the Swim for Tom.,Tom’s mum, Debbie Walker, said: “If we tally up all of the money raised starting from when Tom and his dad, Tim, did last year’s Brecon Beacons Night Hike, the money in Tom’s fund is £50,931.07.”,The tally includes money raised by Tom’s 11-year-old sister Emily who sang in Cwmbran town centre before Christmas (£229.23), a Christmas charity car park run by pupils in Town House at Monmouth School for Boys (£585), and collections made by a parent.

The resulting Kickapoo Park Community Garden, which opened in late April, 2018, is the collaborative effort of Community Renewal of Pottawatomie County and the Community Garden Sub-Committee of the Blue Zones Project/Pottawatomie County.,Partners in Caring

As part of Avedis Foundation’s Pottawatomie County Education Initiative, Avedis continues to serve as a stakeholder to promote the services and activities provided by Partners In Caring (PIC), a multi-partnered, coordinated school health team that provides critical, combined support to rural schools to ensure that children are healthy, safe, engaged, and ready to learn.,Blue Zones Project read more

TV doctor Chris van Tulleken is explaining how he and his other half underwent counselling last year.,Yes, in the 'spouse' seat during counselling was Xand, his identical twin and fellow telly doctor.,This series couldn't be more timely: while life expectancy has generally risen over the years, many people's healthy life expectancy ends at 64; after that, the risk of heart disease, dementia, stroke and cancers increases significantly.,Today in the Mail's pullout, the twins focus on anti-ageing your brain, and show you simple strategies to give it a boost — from telling you why you're becoming forgetful to revealing the techniques you can use to improve brain health and function.,One of the most compelling experiments on The Twinstitute involves two sets of twins taking up painting and pottery to test the benefits of learning a skill on cognitive function — with some stunning results: one twin, in her mid-60s, shaved ten years off her brain age.

Research done by Windee M. Weiss, Ph.D. of the University of Northern Iowa  emphasizes the importance of parents staying accountable for and modeling good behavior, and helping their children interpret their sport experiences.,On the negative side, parents who lose accountability for their lofty expectations and put too many demands on their young athletes before, during, and after competition can create stress that can destroy their child’s enjoyment of sport.,Coaches also report that children’s sport performance is affected by the presence of parents.,LaVoi and Stellino research found that the children of parents who create anxiety about failing and emphasize winning are more likely to engage in poor sport behaviors than children whose parents encourage enjoyment and self-mastery.,TrueSport® inspires athletes, coaches, parents, and administrators to change the culture of youth sport through active engagement and thoughtful curriculum based on cornerstone lessons of sportsmanship, character-building, and clean and healthy performance, by creating leaders across communities through sport.

In their first season in Indianapolis, head coach Frank Reich, left, and offensive coordinator and Jamestown native Nick Sirianni have guided the Colts into the playoffs.,Father Fran, a member of the Chautauqua Sports Hall of Fame, coached Southwestern High School from the mid-1970s to the early 1980s; brother Mike is the head coach at Washington & Jefferson College where he has compiled one of the best winning percentages in the NCAA; and brother Jay coached Southwestern to a pair of New York State Public High School Athletic Association championships in 2008 and 2009.,Once the youngest Sirianni arrived at the University of Mount Union, he played for Larry Kehres, who guided the Purple Raiders to 11 national championships in his career.,Upon his graduation, Sirianni began his climb up the coaching ranks with stops at Mount Union, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, the Kansas Chiefs and the San Diego/Los Angeles Chargers, before joining Reich’s staff in Indianapolis last February.,“One of the reasons I’m in the position I’m in now is because of the successful coaches I’ve been around, starting with growing up in a coach’s house, learning how to coach with my brothers, and then, obviously, playing for the most successful coach in NCAA football history in Larry Kehres,” he told The Post-Journal last October.