NEW HAVEN, CT (WFSB) - More than 50 people, including two celebrities and a lawyer from Connecticut, face charges for their suspected involvement in a college bribery scheme.,Investigators said more than 30 wealthy parents, including actors Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin, Connecticut lawyer Gordon Caplan, and nine coaches were involved.,Among those coaches was a former soccer coach at Yale.,Investigators said Singer mailed former Yale soccer coach Rudy Meredith a check for $400,000.,According to court documents, Singer would take "Yale applicant 1's art portfolio" then "'revise' the materials to 'soccer.'"

The federal investigation into a massive cheating scandal in which prominent actors and business leaders got their children into elite universities included seeking records from several prominent Southern California prep schools, according to two sources familiar with the probe.The sources did not name the schools but said they are some of the most well-known private institutions in the area.,They said federal authorities issued subpoenas for records involving some of the students involved in the fraud case.One source with knowledge of the investigation stressed that officials are not at this point accusing the schools of wrongdoing but rather seeking information about student performance and other details.The scheme, which began in 2011, centered around the owner of a for-profit Newport Beach college admissions company that wealthy parents paid to help their children cheat on college entrance exams and to falsify athletic records of students to enable them to secure admission to elite schools, including UCLA, USC, Stanford, Yale and Georgetown, according to court records.Fifty people, across academia and college sports as well as a cadre of super-wealthy parents, have been charged in what prosecutors say is the largest college admissions scam ever prosecuted.,He said they knowingly conspired to help their children cheat or buy their children admission to elite schools through fraud.Among those charged were Hollywood actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin.Huffman is in custody in Los Angeles, along with 11 others.,Law enforcement sources told The Times she was flying to Los Angeles to surrender.Loughlin, of Full House" fame, and Huffman, whose credits include the hit ABC show Desperate Housewives, are charged with conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud.,According to court records, Loughlin and her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, the famous creator of clothing brand Mossimo, agreed to pay bribes totaling $500,000 in exchange for having their two daughters designated as recruits to the USC crew team even though they did not participate in crew.Huffman is accused of disguising a $15,000 charitable payment in the bribery scheme, according to court records.

In allegations that sent shock waves through academia, federal prosecutors on Tuesday accused top CEOs, two Hollywood actresses and a legendary fashion designer of taking part in an audacious scheme to get their children into elite universities through fraud, bribes and lies.The scheme, which began in 2011, centered around the owner of a for-profit Newport Beach college admissions company that wealthy parents paid to help their children cheat on college entrance exams and to falsify athletic records of students to enable them to secure admission to elite schools, including UCLA, USC, Stanford, Yale and Georgetown, according to court records.Fifty people, across academia and college sports as well as a cadre of super-wealthy parents, have been charged in what prosecutors say is the largest college admissions scam ever prosecuted.,Some parents participated in one aspect of the scheme, while others paid for both, stealing slots from hard-working students with legitimate grades and test scores, authorities said.William Rick Singer, who owns the admissions company called the Edge College Career Network, was charged with money laundering, obstruction of justice, racketeering and conspiracy to defraud the United States.,In at least one instance, a student claimed to have a learning disability to obtain medical documentation required by the College Board and ACT Inc. to grant additional time on the tests, according to court documents.Once the students were given additional time, which generally allowed them to take the test over two days instead of one and in an individual setting, the clients were instructed to change the location of the exam to either a public high school in Houston or a private college preparatory school in West Hollywood that Singer controlled, according to the documents.At those locations, prosecutors allege, Singer bribed test administrators Igor Dvorskiy, of Los Angeles, and Lisa Niki Williams, of Houston, with the parents money to facilitate cheating on the exams.,Singer had a psychologist on his team assign fake learning disabilities to give students an academic advantage, the charges say.Coaches and private admissions counselors allegedly received money for helping to get students admitted as athletes at Yale, Stanford and USC.USC senior associate athletic director Donna Heinel and mens and womens water polo coach Jovan Vavic were alleged to have received bribes totaling more than $1.3 million and $250,000, respectively, to help parents take advantage of the relaxed admissions standards for athletes at USC even though their children were not legitimately being recruited as athletes.,It described spending thousands of dollars on trips for dental students to help needy Cambodians and offering math tutoring to underserved children in Oakland.Prosecutors said the charity was nothing more than a means to launder money to an array of people requiring bribes.Our contributions to major athletic university programs may help to provide placement to students that may not have access under normal channels, the organization stated in tax documents.Federal law enforcement began the investigation, dubbed Operation Varsity Blues, in May 2018, based on a tip from a confidential source who was being interviewed as part of a separate investigation, said FBI Special Agent Joseph Bonavolonta.Make no mistake: This is not a case where parents were acting in the best interests of their children.

Tryouts: Sunday, March 17, 2-5 p.m. at Mystic Indoor sports for all baseball and softball players ages 8-12 For questions, email London Babe Ruth — Spring registration is open online at newlondonbaberuth.weebly.com.,Waterford/Montville Babe Ruth 13U-14U travel teams — Evaluations are March 3 at Mystic Indoor Sports (90 Welles Road) from 9-11 a.m. No fee to attend, but is mandatory for players interested in travel teams.,Contact: Joe Auwood, (860) 443-1523 of email [email protected]

CT Crush softball — Looking for players for 10U, 12U, 14U and 16U teams.,Contact: [email protected] read more

Tryouts: Sunday, March 17, 2-5 p.m. at Mystic Indoor sports for all baseball and softball players ages 8-12 For questions, email London Babe Ruth — Spring registration is open online at newlondonbaberuth.weebly.com.,Waterford/Montville Babe Ruth 13U-14U travel teams — Evaluations are March 3 at Mystic Indoor Sports (90 Welles Road) from 9-11 a.m. No fee to attend, but is mandatory for players interested in travel teams.,Contact: [email protected]

CT Tornados baseball — Looking for players for 12U and 14U spring and summer teams.,Contact: cttornados.com or Hurricanes baseball — Looking for players for 13U-18U spring and summer teams.,Advance tickets are on sale by Ticketmaster at (800) 745-3000, ticketmaster.com or at the Mohegan Sun box Football Showcase — Saturday, April 27, Cheshire High School, 2-7 p.m. Event provides high school, prep school and junior college players a chance to take part in drills to Division II, III and NAIA coaches throughout the Northeast. read more

Tryouts: Sunday, March 17, 2-5 p.m. at Mystic Indoor sports for all baseball and softball players ages 8-12 For questions, email London Babe Ruth — Spring registration is open online at newlondonbaberuth.weebly.com.,Contact: Joe Auwood, (860) 443-1523 of email [email protected]

CT Crush softball — Looking for players for 10U, 12U, 14U and 16U teams.,Contact: [email protected] read more

That number might sound unimpressive, but consider: Investments in index funds and ETFs have outpaced inflow into actively managed funds in recent years, according to Charles Schwab (SCHW), with Bogle's Vanguard Institutional Index Fund — now $168.22 billion — leading the tidal change.,"Investors have withdrawn $500 billion from actively managed funds (including ETFs) and put $600 billion into index funds over the past five years," Bogle told IBD.,The next year Bogle, influenced greatly by American economists Eugene Fama and Burton Malkiel, both champions of long-term investing, founded the Vanguard 500 Index Fund, the nation's first index mutual fund.,Mark Hebner, president of Irvine, Calif.-based wealth-management firm Index Fund Advisors, references the long run that Bogle's "The Little Book of Common Sense Investing" has enjoyed as the No. 1 investing book on Amazon.com and says the index king's brilliance stems from the simple fact that "markets are efficient.",Bottom line, Bogle believes that index funds will become more popular than actively managed products.

Waterford — Frank and Sheila Beneski are the first family of high school basketball in Connecticut, the husband-wife duo who sees hundreds of games every season and whose presence fortified the big-game feel last weekend at the Francis X. Sweeney Fieldhouse.,As in: There are an appreciable number of kids throughout the state that decided to forgo the remainder of high school careers to attend a prep school somewhere.,Sad that those kids and their families can't experience what the folks inside the "X" did Saturday: high school sports the way they were intended to be played and portrayed.,I get that kids attend prep school — and forgo high school — for reasons beyond sports.,And the idea that it dupes parents and robs kids of the high school sports experience?

Waterford — Frank and Sheila Beneski are the first family of high school basketball in Connecticut, the husband-wife duo who sees hundreds of games every season and whose presence fortified the big-game feel last weekend at the Francis X. Sweeney Fieldhouse.,As in: There are an appreciable number of kids throughout the state that decided to forgo the remainder of high school careers to attend a prep school somewhere.,Sad that those kids and their families can't experience what the folks inside the "X" did Saturday: high school sports the way they were intended to be played and portrayed.,I get that kids attend prep school — and forgo high school — for reasons beyond sports.,And the idea that it dupes parents and robs kids of the high school sports experience?

On the first drive to South Bend, Justin and Jiseop Yoon talked in Korean, like they always do.,Jiseop, 52, arrived in the United States at 13 years old, when his father, a Korean naval officer, sent him to boarding school because they wanted their son to experience the U.S. There, he lived in a foster home and eventually did figure skating at a high level in his native South Korea.,Clockwise from top left: Jiseop, Mihwa, Eric and Justin Yoon.Courtesy of Jiseop Yoon Justin was born in Cincinnati before moving to Korea with his family, where he went to international school.,You're different from all the other kids," Jiseop told Justin.,Justin Yoon kicking for Milton Academy.Photo courtesy of Jiseop Yoon For high school, Justin was sent to Milton Academy, hand-selected by Jiseop because of its academic and equally important athletic fit.