With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting��exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

With these ideas in mind, Alison Divine and colleagues at Canada's Western University paired with fellow researchers in the UK to investigate the possible role of Facebook in stimulating college students (always a good sample for social media research) to increase their exercise motivation.,Including in their study the role of relatedness, or psychological-need satisfaction in exercising with others, the Canada-UK team believed that college students who were more connected on Facebook, and also enjoyed sharing their exercise with other people, would have deeper and more lasting exercise motivation.,In SDT, the need for relatedness is a potent motivator, and “it is within the social context that needs can be promoted or thwarted, suggesting that Facebook, as a growing part of the social context for undergraduate students, has the potential to play a positive or negative role in exercise motivation and well-being.”,Hence, the authors believe in the perhaps counterintuitive view that Facebook can enhance exercise motivation in a positive sense by building support for physical activity among one’s general group of friends.,On the other hand, for some participants, the Facebook exercise motivation remained positive, allowing them to find enjoyment in physical activity via their feelings of connections to their friends.

ESPN the Magazine’s annual “Body Issue,” which hits newsstands Friday and features nude and semi-nude photos of athletes, features Chamberlain, who hit an NCAA-record 95 homers from 2012-15 at OU and plays for National Pro Fastpitch’s USSSA Pride., The photos have already been released online, and Chamberlain posted some of them on her personal Twitter, along with a message about body image., With strategic coverage of private parts, the global cable and satellite sports media company intended to show the beauty of athletes’ bodies in all shapes and sizes., “The more we can get more realistic bodies in front of [young girls], the better,” Jessica Mendoza, the first softball player to appear in the annual issue, in 2009, told USA Today at the time., As OU reaps the reward of the sport’s surge in excitement, unique opportunities like Chamberlain’s appearance in the “Body Issue” are part of what will keep it growing.

Fast forward to 2017—the 30-year-old gained six pounds, returned to running, and placed fifth in the New York City Marathon., Kieffer, who has been seeing a nutrition specialist for about two months, says her recent success has come largely from not worrying that she doesn’t look exactly like other runners., She talked to Runner’s World about her favorite foods and how pro running can do better about positive body image., There’s so much pressure on being a certain weight., Carbs Aren’t “Cheap” MealsI used to be huge about eating low glycemic index foods.